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Comment: Re:Cry Me A River (Score 1) 494

by jrumney (#47421639) Attached to: Normal Humans Effectively Excluded From Developing Software
I said vim, not vi. I'm well aware that vi goes back further, but nobody in their right mind would consider using the original vi as their primary development tool these days. And Emacs goes back to 1985, not 1972. Sure, it can trace its roots back to ed, from 1972, but it is even less like ed than vim is like vi.

Comment: Re:Cry Me A River (Score 2) 494

by jrumney (#47415563) Attached to: Normal Humans Effectively Excluded From Developing Software
In 1980, a kernel or driver developer was entering data into a mainframe using punchcards in binary (or if they were lucky, an assembler was available for the architecture they were targeting). Version control consisted of a row of 7 cabinets, one for each day of the week, where you stored your most recent stacks of punchcards. They most certainly weren't using vim/emacs, gcc and git and debugging in a VM.

Comment: Re:And in other news (Score 1) 139

by jrumney (#47404435) Attached to: Uber Is Now Cheaper Than a New York City Taxi

On the flip side, taxi drivers have many more hours behind the wheel [aka sleep deprivation]. I thinks it's fair to say that there are many factors which contribute to both raise and lower a taxi's risk of getting into an accident.

So far we've only come up with factors that raise the risk. What are the factors that lower it?

Comment: Re: What else is safe ? (Score 2) 349

by jrumney (#47386545) Attached to: Qualcomm Takes Down 100+ GitHub Repositories With DMCA Notice
Easy solution in this case is to remove all Qualcomm code from the Linux kernel. In the short term this will cause a lot of pain for end users and companies that use Qualcomm hardware in their products, but in the long run this will effectively shut Qualcomm out of a very large portion of their market and serve as an excellent example to others why the DMCA should be used with great care.

Comment: Re: On this 4th of July... (Score 2) 349

by jrumney (#47386403) Attached to: Qualcomm Takes Down 100+ GitHub Repositories With DMCA Notice

I'd think that any company selling Android based mobile phone, tablet or other Linux based device built from GPL code they received directly from Qualcomm would have good standing to take this to court. End users not so much.

Maybe Qualcomm really have made the decision that they only want their chips used in Windows Phone devices from now on, because this is the signal they are sending to manufacturers that rely on their hardware support for Linux and Android with this move.

Comment: Re:Noticed this before (Score 4, Informative) 110

by jrumney (#47383205) Attached to: Android Leaks Location Data Via Wi-Fi
Its the scan of nearby networks bit where it needs to send out the WiFi networks it wants to connect to. That's why making your SSID hidden is a security anti-pattern. Tell the owners of the networks you connect to to stop doing it - anyone nearby can see all the clients making requests to join your network, so it isn't adding any security in your near vicinity, and elsewhere, others can still see your clients trying to connect to your network wherever they are, because to connect to hidden networks you have to go out and proactively look for them.

Comment: Re:Not just Android (Score 4, Informative) 110

by jrumney (#47383175) Attached to: Android Leaks Location Data Via Wi-Fi
The headline also fails to mention that only manually configured networks are affected (or perhaps old versions of Android, I don't remember the details from the comments to the story about 6 months ago regarding the exact same "flaw" in iOS). This is why it is a BAD idea for security to turn off access point beacons - because if your access point is not sending out beacons to identify itself, then the clients need to send out connection requests blindly - wherever they are.

Comment: Re: What's with the 'might'? (Score 1) 359

I seem to recall only two floppies were needed, one for the kernel and one for userspace. But that was a bare bones command line install. As there were no distros yet, everything else was downloaded to my 40MB hard drive and compiled from source (including a replacement kernel that had all the drivers for my hardware, once the bootstrapping was out of the way).

Comment: Re:DUDE actually has a point (Score 1) 238

by jrumney (#47373259) Attached to: Following EU Ruling, BBC Article Excluded From Google Searches

So dude doesn't want his name's first search result to be an over-hyped headline.

I don't know if it was the first search result (I am well outside the EU, but don't see it anywhere in the first 5 pages, so maybe Google's takedown was wider than TFS suggests), but based on what I did see, he's got his work cut out recovering his reputation this way - there are similar articles in NYT, Time, WSJ and pretty much every other major news source outside the jurisdiction of the EU dominating at least the first five pages of results.

"Those who will be able to conquer software will be able to conquer the world." -- Tadahiro Sekimoto, president, NEC Corp.

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