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Comment Re:Makes sense (Score 4, Insightful) 157

It is more complicated than that. It's not "I'm a fast runner", that seems to trigger the cheating. It's the "I'm a faster runner than others". In the article at the Washington Post, there is a description of the experimental set-up. Games that are a battle against yourself (like a trivia game or playing the lottery) don't let people cheat afterwards. Games that are a battle against an opponent do.

It seems the experience of winning against someone else which causes you to feel entitled and to cheat the next time to ensure your next win. And then you get into a spiral of cheating, winning, cheating, winning etc.pp., we know so well from professional sports or successful businessmen with shady ethics.

Comment Re:Youtube next? (Score 2) 173

Facebook has strict rules how the buttons have to be implemented, and thus they are liable for anything caused by those buttons.

It would be different if Facebook didn't have those rules in place, then they could claim innocence for the data arriving at their servers.

And if would be different if EU law didn't explicitly forbid collecting data without the consent of the ones creating the data. And no, it's not the responsibility of the users to take care to not create the data in the first place. It's always the fault of the one collecting it afterwards without consent. "But it is out there and can easily be collected" is not a valid argument in the view of EU law.,

Comment Re:yes, or simply try to imagine what sort of dama (Score 1) 213

The Volkswagen Beetle is an original design of Ferdinand Porsche. Yes, that guy Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche, whose engineering company was called Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche G.m.b.H., and which later turned into the Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche Aktiengesellschaft or Porsche AG for short. The Porsche AG at first was building performance versions of the VW Beetle with newly shaped car bodies and improved engines, which were called Projekt 356 or Porsche 356.

Comment Re:Why? (Score 1) 459

There have been similar attempts in other legislations, which all failed, because somehow the people who elected the current legislation for some reason wanted it to be that way, and they were still the majority. So I doubt, 20,000 voters will make a difference even in New Hampshire. If they want to vote for something too different, there will always be 20,000 others voting against.

We will see how this works out, but I remain doubtful.

Comment Re:No privacy for Americans? (Score 3, Informative) 29

When you data gets mined by the FBI (and in theory also by the NSA), you have means of bringing that to court. Europeans not being citizens of the U.S. didn't even have this, as their privacy is not protected by the U.S. constitution. This was the main argument why the European Court ruled that the Safe Harbour Agreement does not provide sufficient protection to E.U. citizens and thus is invalid.

Submission + - Push To Hack: Reverse engineering an IP camera (contextis.com)

tetraverse writes: For our most recent IoT adventure, we've examined an outdoor cloud security camera which like many devices of its generation a) has an associated mobile app b) is quick to setup and c) presents new security threats to your network.

Submission + - Patent troll VirnetX awarded $626M in damages from Apple (arstechnica.com)

Tackhead writes: Having won a $200M judgement against Microsoft in 2010, lost a $258M appeal against Cisco in 2013, and having beaten Apple for $368M in 2012, only to see the verdict overturned in 2014, patent troll VirnetX is back in the news, having been awarded $626M in damages arising from the 2012 Facetime patent infringement case against Apple.

Submission + - Stephen Elop Assumes Position In McMaster University

jones_supa writes: Technology maven Stephen Elop is coming home. McMaster University has officially announced that the former alumnus and Microsoft and Nokia executive has been named the distinguished engineering executive in residence at the school's faculty of engineering. It is an advisory position, where he will give insights into new research and teaching opportunities, as well as helping to translating academic knowledge to a wider audience. He will also give lectures twice a year, as well as sit on the dean's advisory council and act as an advisor to the dean. Elop is an alumnus of the McMaster Computer Engineering and Management Program, where he graduated in 1986. The faculty also awarded him with an honorary doctor of science degree in 2009.
Canada

A Legal Name Change Puts 'None of the Above' On Canadian Ballot (foxnews.com) 171

PolygamousRanchKid writes: The ballot to fill a legislative seat in Canada next month includes none of the above—and it's a real person. Sheldon Bergson, 46, had his name legally changed to Above Znoneofthe and is now a candidate for the Ontario legislature, the CBC reports. The election is Feb. 11. The ballot lists candidates in alphabetical order by surname so his name will be the 10th of the 10 candidates as Znoneofthe Above, according to CBC. One of his opponents is running on the line of the None of The Above Party. Maybe the American folks can learn from their cousins up north? Shouldn't every election have a line for "None of the above"? I can't wait until Little Bobby Tables hits 35.

Submission + - Candidate's legal name change puts 'none of the above' on ballot in Canada (foxnews.com)

PolygamousRanchKid writes: The ballot to fill a legislative seat in Canada next month includes none of the above—and it’s a real person. Sheldon Bergson, 46, had his name legally changed to Above Znoneofthe and is now a candidate for the Ontario legislature, the CBC reports. The election is Feb. 11. The ballot lists candidates in alphabetical order by surname so his name will be the 10th of the 10 candidates as Znoneofthe Above, according to CBC.

One of his opponents is running on the line of the None of The Above Party.

Maybe the American folks can learn from their cousins up north . . . ?

Submission + - Developers gather to help charities at massive virtual hack.summit() conference (hacksummit.org)

An anonymous reader writes: hack.summit (https://hacksummit.org) looks like a very interesting event — a pure virtual conference with a speaker roster that's surprisingly strong. The kicker is that it's all for charity to help coding non-profits. Lots of credible tech companies are behind it (Github, StackOverflow, IBM, etc). Part of the event is a global hackathon, where developers can hack over a weekend to help charities and win prizes.

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