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Comment: Re:I bet Infosys and Tata are dancing in the stree (Score 1) 172

Sound like a legitimate argument to me, that needs a serious refutation if you disagree with him.

Title 8 of the US Code is 1000 pages long. We have more than enough laws on the books about immigration.

What he's really saying is that Congress hasn't given him a law that he likes, so he's writing his own. Which even he admits isn't actually within his authority, but he's betting that nobody will be able to stop him.

Comment: Re:I bet Infosys and Tata are dancing in the stree (Score 1) 172

Still, the complaint is not that he doesn't do anything with the laws that the Congress passes, the complaint is that Congress doesn't pass any laws that address important issues.

There are already plenty of laws addressing immigration that the President has chosen to ignore. Claiming that Congress should be passing more laws on the subject is a little silly -- if the President doesn't like them, what's to stop him from ignoring them too?

Comment: Re:Not Sexism (Score 1) 635

by CAIMLAS (#48405201) Attached to: Sweden Considers Adding "Sexism" Ratings To Video Games

Also, on this:

"Maybe you could pick out the sexual nature of the violence and say that applying that to only one sex makes a difference."

They'll ultimately say that violence is inherrently 'male' and therefore, it's sexist.

Just like people who disagree with Obama's policy still get smeared with "racist". Just another way to shut down those they disagree with.

Comment: Re: Seems obvious (Score 3, Informative) 103

I'm on the flip side. I absolutely prefer the 16:10 aspect of my Android tablets over my iPad. Especially for apps that take advantage of 2 columns, like email and Firefox's browser -- which puts new windows down the left side. I'm the same for my desktops and absolutely prefer my MacBook Pro's- and Apple 30"'s 16:10 screen over any of my any 4:3 screen I've owned in the past.

So much content is optimized for widescreen these days and I hope Apple's next iPads finally makes move to 16:10(9)... I really don't want to support 4:3 anymore for any of my development work -- call me selfish.
China

Ask Slashdot: Is Non-USB Flash Direct From China Safe? 178

Posted by timothy
from the ask-all-its-previous-partners dept.
Dishwasha (125561) writes I recently purchased a couple 128GB MicroSDXC card from a Chinese supplier via Alibaba at 1/5th the price of what is available in the US. I will be putting one in my phone and another in my laptop. A few days after purchased, it occurred to me there may be a potential risk with non-USB flash devices similar to USB firmware issues. Does anybody know if there are any known firmware issues with SD or other non-USB flash cards that could effectively allow a foreign seller/distributor to place malicious software on my Android phone or laptop simply on insertion of the device with autoplay turned off?

Comment: Re:Comcast tried to steal $50 from me (Score 1) 223

by aardvarkjoe (#48383277) Attached to: Overbilled Customer Sues Time Warner Cable For False Advertising

Fraud is an intentional tort. If they never intend to give the rebate for all eligible people, then it is fraud if they then do not actually do it (even if you don't complain). If not enough money is allocated up front, and if they run out of money to pay all the eligible rebates they receive, then it seems to me to be fraud (although IANAL)...

Well, the question comes down to what happens if every single person actually does comply with the terms of the rebate and requests it. It seems like either some party (either the company that offered the rebate, or the company that the rebate handling was outsourced to) will be forced to cough up the extra money to cover every rebate, or they will fail to pay out the rebates.

You seem to be assuming that the latter is the guaranteed result, but I don't see that it is. I'm not privy to the details of these contracts, but I would be amazed if they don't, as a general rule, spell out who is responsible for costs that exceed the expected cost of the rebate program.

Comment: Re:Comcast tried to steal $50 from me (Score 1) 223

by aardvarkjoe (#48379977) Attached to: Overbilled Customer Sues Time Warner Cable For False Advertising

Outsourcing and incentivizing itself isn't fraudulent (just shady), but the reason that it's often fraudulent is that the allocated pool of money to the external marketing firm is never enough to cover the worst case, so they are effectively going into the promotion with the deliberate intent to defraud customers of the rebate and the original company doesn't indemnify the external company for worst-case shortfall (because they don't trust these shady rebate companies enough to think they won't just claim/pocket the money).

If the people who apply for the rebate get the promised rebate, then how could you possibly claim that anyone is being defrauded?

Comment: Re:Comcast tried to steal $50 from me (Score 1) 223

by aardvarkjoe (#48379789) Attached to: Overbilled Customer Sues Time Warner Cable For False Advertising

Because as you say the companies are actively planning to make the advertised price/rebate not possible, or very complicated for the customer to get.

I didn't say that at all. Doing that would be fraud, and should be prosecuted under existing laws. But there are plenty of times when obtaining a rebate is straightforward, and you want to make those illegal as well.

For the customers to compare products, with such complicated pricing schemes is just not feasible; it would take days to evaluate.

Well, I'm assuming people who can look at an advertised price of $X ($Y before rebate) and make a comparison, which is how most rebate offers that I see are advertised. If it takes you days to do that comparison, you probably are not qualified to be handling money at all.

Comment: Re:Comcast tried to steal $50 from me (Score 2) 223

by aardvarkjoe (#48377853) Attached to: Overbilled Customer Sues Time Warner Cable For False Advertising

can't just ban the blatant rip-off of rebate promotions?

If the company honors the rebate as promised, and provides the terms of the rebate up front, then it's not a rip-off. If they don't, well, then that's fraud -- there are already laws against it, although I wouldn't mind seeing more enforcement of those laws.

Why should the government prevent competent adults from entering into an agreement that includes a rebate? Sure, the companies are hoping that many will not claim it, but that's the customer's choice.

I don't like the hassle of rebates myself (when I compare prices, I don't take rebates into consideration), but I don't need the government making that decision for me.

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