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Comment: Re: Trolls are bad people (Score 1) 229

by aardvarkjoe (#47970227) Attached to: Friendly Reminder: Do Not Place Your iPhone In a Microwave

What if I dressed up as a doctor, had an air of gravitas, videoed from what looks like an ivy covered university and gave terrible terrible medical advice about Tylenol maximum dosages?

Not really the same thing, as that could cause death (or death-like symptoms).

Or if I dressed as a garage mechanic used all kinds of mechanical words and gave horrible advice such as sugar in the gas tank eliminates the squeal when you hit the brakes?

This falls under the category of life lesson. Just like the iPhone trick.

Apple

Why You Can't Manufacture Like Apple 388

Posted by timothy
from the you-just-haven't-earned-it-yet-baby dept.
HughPickens.com writes Medium reports that although many startups want to design something that mimics the fit and finish of an Apple product, it's a good way to go out of business. "What happened when Apple wanted to CNC machine a million MacBook bodies a year? They bought 10k CNC machines to do it. How about when they wanted to laser drill holes in MacBook Pros for the sleep light but only one company made a machine that could drill those 20 m holes in aluminum? It bought the company that made the machines and took all the inventory. And that time when they needed batteries to fit into a tiny machined housing but no manufacturer was willing to make batteries so thin? Apple made their own battery cells. From scratch." Other things that Apple often does that can cause problems for a startup include white plastic (which is the most difficult color to mold), CNC machining at scale (too expensive), Laser drilled holes (far more difficult than it may seem), molded plastic packaging (recycled cardboard is your friend), and 4-color, double-walled, matte boxes + HD foam inserts (It's not unusual for them to cost upwards of $12/unit at scale. And then they get thrown away.). "If you see a feature on an Apple device you want to copy, try to find it on another company's product. If you do, it's probably okay to design into your product. Otherwise, lower your expectations. I assure you it'll be better for your startup."
Upgrades

Why the iPhone 6 Has the Same Base Memory As the iPhone 5 252

Posted by timothy
from the enough-is-enough-for-anybody dept.
Lucas123 writes When the iPhone 5 was launched two years ago, the base $199 (with wireless plan) model came with 16GB of flash memory. Fast forward to this week when the iPhone 6 was launched with the same capacity. Now consider that the cost of 16GB of NAND flash has dropped by more than 13% over the past two years. So why would Apple increase capacity on its $299 model iPhone 6 to 64GB (eliminating the 32GB model), but but keep the 16GB in the $199 model? The answer may lie in the fact that the 16GB iPhone is, and has been, by far the best selling model. IHS analyst Fang Zhang believes Apple is using that to push users to its iCloud storage service. Others believe restricting storage capacity allows Apple to afford the new features, like NFC and biometrics.
Beer

SteadyServ Helps Keep the Draft Beer Flowing (Video) 48

Posted by Roblimo
from the software-and-beer-are-a-natural-partnership dept.
"With iKeg's Technology We Guarantee You Will Never Run Out of Beer," boasts the SteadyServ website. As you listen to interviewee Mike Flockenhaus, though, you'll realize almost immediately that SteadyServ isn't making equipment for home use, but for bars and taverns that serve draft beer. Here's another good line from their site: "With the new iKeg® system, we aim to ensure that you get your beer, in the right place, at the right time. We also want to simplify the lives of all the hard-working people in the beer industry. After all, wanting and having your beer are not the same thing." Even better, it looks like they're hiring. Wouldn't it be wonderful to help keep America from running out of draft beer? (Alternate Video Link)
Patents

Alice Is Killing Trolls But Patent Lawyers Will Strike Back 92

Posted by timothy
from the waiting-in-the-wings-now-patented dept.
snydeq writes The wheels of justice spin slowly, but they seem finally to be running software patents out of town, writes Simon Phipps in his analysis of how Alice Corp. v CLS Bank is becoming a landmark decision for patent cases in the U.S. 'In case after case, the Court of Appeals is using Alice to resolve patent appeals. In each case so far, the Court of Appeals has found the software patents in question to be invalid. ... As PatentlyO points out, the Alice effect is even reaching to lower courts, saving the Court of Appeals from having to strike down patent findings on appeal.' Although the patent industry broadly speaking sees the Alice verdict as a death knell for many existing patents, some expect Alice to turn software patents into 'draftsmen's art because as you and I have seen over the years, every time there's a court ruling it just means that you have to word the patent claims differently.'

Comment: Re:Keyboard (Score 2) 216

by Graymalkin (#47932675) Attached to: iOS 8 Review

My anecdotal data is the opposite of yours. The Surface/Windows 8 onscreen keyboard is absolutely awful compared to the iOS keyboard, even on the iPad.

I hate that the keyboard layout changes when I hit the number/symbol key. Being left handed the number pad being on the right side of the screen is ridiculous and I have to readjust my grip to type numbers. The Shift key also does not reset when returning from the symbol/number mode. So if you need to type XX-xx you need a lot of extra keystrokes and grip readjustment (or at least I do). I've never minded the key labels being capitalized on iOS since they're also capitalized on physical keyboards. It's plain to see when and where capital characters will be typed.

The Windows keyboard is also really uncomfortable to use in portrait orientation (Windows 8 is generally uncomfortable in portrait orientation). On the iPad the keyboard is much more usable in landscape orientation than the Windows keyboard is in portrait.

Issues of meta keys being available is simply a difference between Windows 8 and iOS. There's no need for meta keys to access functionality in iOS because everything is designed for touch. Windows 8 is keeping around DOS keyboard shortcuts on a touchscreen.

Comment: The answer is: neither (Score 1) 391

by CAIMLAS (#47920105) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Any Place For Liberal Arts Degrees In Tech?

This is what they say, but what they really want is H1B and similar workers.

The value of a degree has never been less in this country.

Yes, they want (and NEED) people with critical thinking skills and a firm grasp on the fundamentals of science as per their field, but what they're saying they need with their money is something not even close to that mark in any regard... at least in IT/systems/storage/development.

Games

The Growing Illusion of Single Player Gaming 291

Posted by Soulskill
from the forcing-introverts-to-play-with-introverts dept.
An anonymous reader writes: Multiplayer modes used to be an extra part of most games — an optional addition that the developers could build (or not) as they saw fit. These days, it's different: many games are marketed under the illusion of being single-player, when their focus has shifted to an almost mandatory multiplayer mode. (Think always-online DRM, and games as services.) It's not that this is necessarily bad for gameplay — it's that design patterns are shifting, and if you don't like multiplayer, you're going to have a harder time finding games you do like.

The article's author uses a couple recent major titles as backdrop for the discussion: "With both Diablo III and Destiny, I'm not sure where and how to attribute my enjoyment. Yes, the mechanics of both are sound, but given the resounding emptiness felt when played solo, perhaps the co-op element is compensating. I'd go so far as to argue games can be less mechanically compelling, so long as the multiplayer element is engaging. The thrill of barking orders at friends can, in a way, cover design flaws. I hem and haw on the quality of each game's mechanics because the co-op aspect literally distracted me from engaging with them to some degree."

Comment: Re: I just want the new Nexus. (Score 1) 222

by Graymalkin (#47891463) Attached to: iPhone 6 Sales Crush Means Late-Night Waits For Some Early Adopters

Don't include "if you knew anything about X" in your reply if you're going to spout nonsense. The whole idea behind "Retina" displays is they're an increase in pixel density rather than a simple increase in screen geometry.

The iPhone 4 had a screen with roughly twice the pixel density of the iPhone 3GS and earlier. This is where the "@2x" naming scheme for images originated. The geometry of the iPhone 4's screen was the same as earlier phones but with a higher pixel density. The iPads had the same sort of density increase.

The geometric difference between the iPhone 5 and 6 over the 3GS is immaterial. They maintain the high pixel density. The only place where a developer will care is if they have static images that fill the display. They'd need larger ones for the iPhone 6 and 6+.

For a majority however the increased screen geometry will simple mean more content space. Apps tend to have fixed elements in portions of the screen with flexible space in between. The new iPhones will just see a bit more flexible space.

An icon for a button won't need to change unless you want to make it bigger in proportion to the screen. In fact iOS 8 (the OS on the new phones) has several new view classes that allow them to adapt easily to different screen sizes. This is a feature OSX has had for a long time, the UI can be laid out in relative values so it will be correct no matter the window size or aspect.

If I have seen farther than others, it is because I was standing on the shoulders of giants. -- Isaac Newton

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