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Comment Re:All bullshit (Score 1) 225

Where I live, there's pretty much no sexual shame for a woman to have sex, which eliminates the concept of this argument.

It hasn't eliminated anything, there is nowhere on this planet (outside a 1970's hippie commune) where a 15yo girl can have sex whenever she wants, with whoever she wants....AND....still have nothing to hide because all the parents are cool with it.

Disclaimer: I make no claims about this case in particular but at the end of the day, some males are violent arseholes, some females are manipulative arseholes. Violent aresholes ruin lives, manipulate arseholes ruin lives. It's not, as Feminists and MRA's would have you believe, a "problem with men" or vica-versa, it is, what it has always been - aresholes being arseholes. Arsehoes can be suprisingly difficult to spot (eg:Rolf Harris), I pity any 'peer' with a conscience who is asked by society to find the truth in an "alleged sex-crime".

Comment Re:Veterans care (Score 1) 31

Anybody who ever served on active duty and handled classified information is just a bit hacked off at Her Majesty's cavalier attitude about, well, everything.

That's true, but comparing Hillary's sending and receiving emails that weren't marked as classified over a non-government server is absolutely NOTHING compared to Petraus' knowingly giving top secret information to someone with neither a need to know nor a security clearance. Remember Mata Hari? (I probably spelled that wrong)

Plus, his adultery is strictly against the USMJ code; people have gotten dishonorable discharges for that alone, and anyone else would have gotten time in Leavenworth for spilling secrets. Petraus got off not with a slap on the wrist, but a stern talking to.

User Journal

Journal Journal: Gimpy text and Mars

I use the Gnu Image Manipulation Program (GIMP) to design book covers. It's an excellent free open source program that has three weaknesses -- its menu structure is completely illogical (but can be gotten used to), I can't find a full spectrum palette, and its text handling is so poor as to be useless.

Comment Re:What's the real problem? (Score 1) 190

It's not a question of open vs proprietary, it's a question of buying support from the right people. If you're running code that wasn't developed in house, then you probably don't want to be supporting it in house either. You want an SLA with penalty clauses with someone who will fix it when it breaks. If it's open source, that just means that you have more options in terms of who will support it if the level of support that you want involves fixing bugs and adding features.

Comment Re:Comparison? (Score 1) 245

I was going to comment that I'd expect some variation depending on the quality of the venue, but then I looked at the list. Most of the places that they looked at are top-tier publications, so it's pretty depressing. That said, they are focussing on the wrong aspect of reproducibility. The real metric should be, given the paper, can someone else recreate your work. And I suspect that even more papers fail on that. At the ASPLOS panel discussion this year, there was a proposal that PhD students should spend their first year reproducing some published result. We often do something similar for undergraduate projects (take an idea from a paper, reimplement it, see if your results support their claim).

Comment Re:What's the real problem? (Score 1) 190

For security purposes, it's not unreasonable to suggest that Mr. Big Picture Strategy Guy not be given read/write access to everything he is expected to be planning; that makes his credentials unbelievably valuable to an attacker and if he is in the position of needing to twiddle individual configurations all the time the organization hasn't actually made him the Big Picture Strategy Guy; but widespread read access would be a much harder request to reasonably deny: Anyone who is supposed to be strategizing needs to be able to see the world; and forcing him to wait 48 hours and work from a secondhand report compiled by minions every time he has a question about what the world looks like now is going to waste a lot of everybody's time.

Unless his mandate is strictly "Design us a new system so we can forklift upgrade this whole goddamn place!"(which would be deeply satisfying; but legacy infrastructure never dies that easily); expecting him to work in a black box is unrealistic; but he doesn't necessarily need(or even want to be stuck with) the ability to actually commit his proposed changes to every last widget out there.

Comment Re:That's gonna be a nope (Score 1) 126

There's an increasing amount of good open source software on Android that can replace the Google crap. I'm now using:
  • OSMAnd, which is actually the reason that I'm still using Android. Best mobile maps app (Nokia's Here is better for driving, but not for walking): offline vector maps that are small enough that you can fit a few entire countries on the phone, offline routing, and so on. The version on the Play store is not as good. I used to use the free version on Play, but actually donated $10 to them after discovering the F-Droid version.
  • K9 Mail is a pretty reasonable mail client.
  • Standalone Calendar is a fork of the AOSP calendar (now replaced by the Google Calendar app on most devices). The UI is not great, but I've not found any mobile calendar app that is. I mostly just use the Calendar Widget on my home screen to look at upcoming events and DAVDroid to sync with my CalDAV / CardDAV server (which also syncs with my laptop).
  • Open Camera is definitely a geek's calendar app: far more configurable settings than the stock one, but the UI isn't quite as polished.
  • KQSMS provides a nicer interface to SMS. For backups, SMS Backup+ will sync SMS with an IMAP server.
  • AnySoftKeyboard provides a configurable set of keyboard layouts and, unlike the Google version, doesn't appear to be spyware.
  • Firefox on Android is actually pretty nice, and the addition of the Self Destructing Cookies addon makes it a lot nicer than any other Android browser I've tried (cookies are automatically deleted when you navigate away from a page, tracking cookies are deleted periodically while on the page. There's an undo button if you realised that you actually wanted them for one site, and and you can then whitelist just those ones).

I'd love to have a company adopt some of these, polish the UI a bit, and provide an Android phone that ships with them by default, instead of the Google stuff.

Comment Re:is the problem not ADOBE FLASH? (Score 1) 226

It's not just that they're complex. The code for decoding them is also not usually with security in mind. Remember that libjpeg was written in an era when a 486 was a high-end machine and all three sites on the web that contained images were pretty trustworthy. It needed to be able to decode and display the image in a limited amount of RAM, on a slow CPU, without the user complaining about the time it took (and it didn't - it was slow, and we complained). Modern CPUs are fast enough that even an interpreted JavaScript PNG or JPEG decoder is fast enough, but video decoding (unless offloaded to an accelerator) is still pretty CPU-intensive, so now video decoders are written with performance as the overriding goal and security a distant second. Doing proper bounds checks costs cycles (and, worse, often breaks autovectorisation), so gets overlooked.

Most public domain software is free, at least at first glance.

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