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Comment Re:They're worthless. (Score 4, Insightful) 213

For that to work you need actual hard rules that everyone can agree on.

Sure, electricians and plumbers disagree around the edges (ask a plumber about sharkbite if you want to lose a few hours of your life) but there's a huge chunk that's accepted practice for good, demonstrable and easily definable reasons.

Software is still the wild west, and we're still figuring out how to do it properly.

Comment Re:They're worthless. (Score 1) 213

Yup, Cisco and Microsoft are all about this.

Give your local college a shit tonne of free network gear, heavily subsidize CCNA material/testing, totally worth it when a college basically turns their networking course into a Cisco networking course and everyone who graduates leans towards Cisco products going forward (at least initially in their career).

Comment Re:Neither is Right for Everyone (Score 1) 319

Indeed, comes down to what you want out of your system. Also update frequency isn't as important as the software you choose to run. I happen to mostly use stable stuff that doesn't change much: openbox+xfce for wm, mplayer, and palemoon specifically because I got tired of firefox adding shit I didn't want and taking away stuff I did. I use gentoo and generally do an update every few weeks, but it's been awhile since I did an update and anything radically changed.

With my servers it's much the same story. Most of the stuff I'm using (apache, postgres, nfs, etc..) has been stable for some time, so though I do an update every few weeks, very little changes.

On the other hand, if I was using the latest ubuntu and kde/gnome and vlc and firefox and all that, every update would probably entirely change my system. One day I'd launch firefox and find out that the URL bar was now on the bottom or something to make way for a big facebook widget and my program menu would disappear because gnome decided that Microsoft was on to something when they eliminated the start menu and providing too many options in a list like that was confusing to users.

Comment Re: Yes I'm old.. (Score 2) 267

As a geek who uses Gentoo, I find extra dependencies means extra stuff to break down the road. Anything relating to media or desktop environments is still very much in flux, and I've found when something goes wrong on an update, it's almost always some gnome or kde library that some random package pulled in for the print dialog or some media lib (I wish ffmpeg and libav would kiss and make up..).

These days I avoid gnome completely (systemd caused a lot of headaches, and most of them tied back to gnome somehow, and even before that gnome was a fairly common update breaker), and am hesitant to install things with direct dependencies on kde.

Obviously on more user-friendly distros this is probably a lot less of an issue, even less so if you just use things in the default configuration, but if you like to do things your own way, avoiding boatloads of dependencies to make one thing work is definitely a good idea imo.

Comment Re: Yes I'm old.. (Score 2) 267

Indeed, k3b used to be elegantly simple.. then they added the bloat.

And CD burning is one of those things that is a huge hassle to do from the command line because it involves multiple steps with intermediary files and long chains of options. It's one of the few things where I just want some basic GUI where I can add a bunch of files and click a "burn these to a CD please" button and let it sort it all out.

Comment Re:none (Score 1) 203

I do (seriously).

Some people are interesting or at least can write in an interesting style. The cool thing about the internet is it gives anyone who wants to a platform to babble on. It doesn't guarantee that anyone will listen, but I don't think there is any harm in doing so, and of course some people just enjoy the experience (look at people who keep personal journals that no one sees..)

I have no inclination to have a blog, but I certainly read a fair number of them. Some are from people with serious credentials delivering useful information that may actually influence my thinking, some are by random people who I just find interesting/amusing.

Comment Re:You Get What You Pay For (Score 2) 203

I imagine a lot of people boost their reputation (and thus the money they can make doing speaking engagements / consulting work) by publishing free content. Bruce Schneier comes to mind.

Then there's people like Raymond Chen, who's blog I read despite that I haven't had much to do with windows in about 10 years.. I just find it interesting and he has a fun writing style.

And there's always ad revenue. Stuff like eevblog is "free" but he's probably making a bunch of money on ad revenue (as far as I know, eevblog is his full time job).

Comment Re:Pao Wants "Safe Spaces" for Shills and Ideologu (Score 1) 385

The users are eyeballs for the advertising. If enough of them leave, reddit will die. Digg is a tired but apt example of exactly where reddit is heading.

Is this specific incident gonna kill reddit.. of course not, but the "it's our site, we do what we want" attitude over time will. Reddit doesn't produce content, it provides and environment for others to produce content, and benefits from their presence via ad views. If those users stop liking the environment, they'll pick up and move elsewhere, and without a user base, reddit is done.

Comment Re:Indeed (Score 1) 385

Yes, that's how the whole world works. You really think it doesn't work that way on reddit? Only complete fucking idiots would think otherwise.

I never said reddit didn't work that way (infact, pretty sure I explicitly said it did). For that matter, when did reddit even come into this discussion, my post and the one I originally responded to have mostly been about 4chan...

No, they are taken seriously... seriously enough to be worth harassing. You have that backwards.

Usually people ignore anything they've said and just tell them to drop the trip/etc. The fact that they are trying to have an identity on an anonymous board may be taken seriously, but usually whatever they've said isn't.

Comment Re:Indeed (Score 1) 385

The big difference is that just about anywhere else, people posting anonymously or with an obviously throw away identity are treated as lesser. Here on slashdot (and on reddit) a post by an established identity holds a lot more weight, and the previous behaviour of said identity may also weigh heavily on how the comment is perceived.

It can also take time to build up an identity, and a lot of people value their online identity to a point where they are hesitant to post controversial opinions for fear of ruining it. Yes I can close this account on slashdot if I posted something so hateful that people would immediately jump on any unrelated post I made under it, but I'd be hesitant to do so.

4chan is significantly different in that everyone is expected to be anonymous to a point where people trying to have an established identity without a good reason are harassed and usually not taken seriously. It creates an interesting post-by-post level playing field (as it's often not even clear if the person who counters a response is even the same person who made the original comment). And of course because no one is protecting an established identity, they are free to post whatever the hell they want.

Comment Re:Pao Wants "Safe Spaces" for Shills and Ideologu (Score 3, Insightful) 385

Agree, but they should have had a much better response prepared.

It's like if you suddenly fire the company rep that your main customer has been dealing with exclusively for years. You don't just call them up and say "hey, Joe's no longer with us, we'll get back to you in a bit about his replacement."

Comment Re:Indeed (Score 1) 385

Indeed.

I've been involved in some really amazing discussions on 4chan, and honestly if you avoid /b/ and a few others, the other boards tend to be surprisingly sane.

There's some serious gold under the shit, and it's very cathartic to speak freely with effectively no consequence to yourself (or even an online identity). You can say the most hatefully insane thing you've ever wanted to say in one post, and then immediately make some comment with no connection between the two.

Comment Re:Industrial accidents happen (Score 1) 342

Places I've worked it was a clip like thing with several holes for an actual padlock. The person doing the work keeps the key with them until they are done and there is a big warning tag with all the info on it (who to contact, etc). The clips have multiple holes so if different people are working in different areas, they all have their own lock/key. In cases where something can't actually be locked out (usually if a machine has to be left on but not actually used) a sentry is posted.

I imagine they have similar controls. This sounds like a case of someone getting lazy with procedure, as happens many times a day all around the world. Certainly nothing about it being a robot is all that important.. could have just as easily been any other piece of industrial equipment.

Comment Re:Please fix slashdot (Score 2) 116

So much this.

It's such a small change but it totally screws up a flow we've had forever and which made perfect sense. Read title, read summary, read number of comments, click to read said comments. Now it's, read title, read summary, look to upper right to see number of comments, then move mouse back to title to read them (I'm sure I'm not the only one who moves the mouse along as I read).

And yeah, the weird floating videobytes thing.. that's gotta go.

To iterate is human, to recurse, divine. -- Robert Heller

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