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Comment: chain of evidence (Score 4, Insightful) 142

by goombah99 (#49375001) Attached to: Silk Road Investigators Charged With Stealing Bitcoin

These two were tied up in the chain of evidence that led to his conviction, so depending on what gets tossed he has a chance here. Now he did admit that at one time he was DPR and that he had resumed work under the alias so he's probably not going to get everything overturned. But his defense was that someone else associated possibly with MTGOX was the mastermind framing him more recently.

So what's intriguing here is that one of the investigators was doing some shenanigams with MTGOX accounts and was involved in seizing MTGOX assets. Since MT GOX started having liquidity problems right during this investigation of Silk road, it really makes you wonder if this is where some of those missing assets went.

Furthermore the agents appear to have done things as their shenanigans came to light to obfuscate the trail back to them. This is not too far afield from ulricht's claim that someone was framing him, asking him to step in as DPR, and putting keys on his computer.

It actually seems it's not far fetched to imagine Ulricht was telling the truth about having relinquished DPR that someone suddenly invited him back into the game as the FBI closed in. Perhaps there's some grains of truth in there somewhere. e.g. maybe one of the agents did add his bitcoin keys to Urichts computers.

Given those sorts of conjectures it seems very reasonable he should get a new trial. He's guilty by his own admission, but maybe not guilty of everything he's charged with.

Comment: Where commerical arduino is going next. (Score 1) 92

by goombah99 (#49368243) Attached to: Arduino Dispute Reaches Out To Distributors

there is no more money in arduino hardware anymore.

arguing over who sells the hardware is a lose/lose game.

SLR has announced it's coming out with new boards. But will these be open designs or copyrighted? If they also take over the arduino name for software they control the whole pipeline. Cortex boards are about $20 to $40 right now and they outperform the arduino. SO why are the cortex boards, aside from the raspberry, an idle novelty? because they don't have the unified user base behind the arduino. So who better to come in and scoop this up? after all ardunio is already in this game with the DUE and YUN model which have high perfromance processors like the cortex yet all the existing I/O mapping and IDE of the ardiono. That's where the money lies. Not in the open source arduino hardware but in the next generation built on the user base of the arduino. But it takes the Arduino name to do it, and also someone willing to close the copyright on the desgins while retaining compatibility.

Comment: Arduino Due? Cortex-M for $2.00 (Score 1) 92

by goombah99 (#49366705) Attached to: Arduino Dispute Reaches Out To Distributors

There are dozens of Cortex-M boards far more capable than Arduino and much cheaper. STM's, for one.

You mean like the Arduino Due? That's an Arduino combined with a cortex-M made by arduino.

I've not seen cortex-Ms for $2.50 but you can buy as many arduino's as you want for that. that's the whole board not just the chip. See alibaba.

Comment: RE: Raspberry Pi. Good riddance! (Score 2) 92

by goombah99 (#49365627) Attached to: Arduino Dispute Reaches Out To Distributors

There are dozens of XYZ boards far more capable than Rasberry Pi .

Man the whole point is that the arduino is a common platform for tinkers evrywhere. it's the libraries and community know how that make this fun. In some ways it's like the joy of stock car races where exceeding the imposed limits can be the fun of it. It's also really simple so it's something one person can truly master in their spare time. I'm addicted. I've had doofuses tell me about other development boards that are far superior for reans A,B, and C. Sure if I was building something just to be aproduct, But they aren't going to be any fun to goof with in general.

Comment: Crashplan (Score 1) 122

by goombah99 (#49355291) Attached to: Amazon Announces Unlimited Cloud Storage Plans

For DIY offsite backup I use crashplan. Their system lets you use their servers if you choose (for payment) but it also lets you use a remote disk you have over at a freinds house too, or one attached to your computer. I bought their software after using the free version for years. Besides being a nice automated backup system, the killer thing was the ability to backup offsite to a friends house. I do it mutually with them, each keeping the other's USB disk at our respective homes.

What's great about this is that if I do ever need to do a full backup, I don't have to try streaming it back through a soda straw over the web. I just drive the station wagon over, pick up the disk, and bring it home. Station wagons have very high bandwidth.

The disk is encrypted so no worries about peepers or what happens if my freinds computer gets broken into.

The payware version is a one time payment not a monthly fee. What you get for the payware version is more parsimonious differential backups and some other features about controlling backup times.

The software has gotten much better over the years too. Early on my complaint was the java bloated itself out to huge memory sizes over time. But now I don't even notice it is running.

Anytime I need to do a bigger than normal backup, I go get the disk and attach it locally, then take it back. That only happens when there's an unusual event. For example, if I make a major change in the structure of my file system, copy everything to a new disk or do something that touches all the files, then this could, in most backup systems, trigger a level 0 backup. So when that happens it's much easier to get things up to date then with any on-the-net storage system.

Comment: #PRAGMA (Score 1) 111

by goombah99 (#49344987) Attached to: The One Thousand Genes You Could Live Without

Does that include everything needed to build the DNA-to-meat compiler, or is there some bootstrapping that must happen too?

You are quite correct that you have to bootstrap the compiler.

I tried to account for that partially by noting that there's plenty of room on the CD to store the epigenetic information. You can think of this epigenetic information as the #PRAGMA compiler directives and differences between non-ANSI compilers. So once we take those into account one could map the source code to the needs of any possible compiler. Thus in principle at least one could build a human using a compiler adapted from another somewhat similar organism. That is to say one could in principle compile a neaderthal on a homosapien compiler or a mammoth on an elephant compiler as long as you have the means to take the epigenetic aspects into account.

An inclined plane is a slope up. -- Willard Espy, "An Almanac of Words at Play"

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