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Comment: Apple Pay up next? (Score 2) 403

by goombah99 (#48946771) Attached to: How, and Why, Apple Overtook Microsoft

There were cell phone based payment systems before iPay, but now the point of sale terminals are going to finally happen. I think apple Pay is going to be a huge money maker as it becomes wide spread. It's timing is interesting. Credit card makers in the US are on the cusp of rolling out chip and pin and merchants will need to upgrade their point of sale terminals. . No one is excited about this mandated cost since analyses have shown didn't change the total amount of fraud (in the long run), it just shifted it from in-person fraud (where the chip works) to internet sales. However, apple pay, which does work, can just slip stream right along on the mass pos changeover without imposing an extra cost the merchants were not going have to pay anyhow (for chip and pin).

Second, this year at least, apple appears to have the best finger print reader. As motorola noted recently they left finger print ID off the new nexus because all the other vendors of the technology produce unsatisfactory finger print ID. It's either too many false positives or too many false negatives.

The challenge to apple pay of course is the market share of handsets. But as long as there are enough to make it worth making the NFC sensors compatible with Apple's bank authorization schema they will be in stores, giving apple a growing drip feed of cash.

Comment: What, no Capcha? (Score 1) 85

by goombah99 (#48889461) Attached to: 'Never Miss Another Delivery' - if You Have a TrackPIN (Video)

1) You could use the last 4 digits of the package tracking number as the delivery driver's PIN, and tell him or her what to do in a note stuck to your front door.

I think they need to have a Capcha as well so the delivery person can prove he's a human not an autonomous drone. Make him do a mathc problem to compute the number.

Comment: Re:This had nothing to do with science (Score 1) 497

by goombah99 (#48874967) Attached to: Science By Democracy Doesn't Work

Gravity is a hoax. The earth is a large flat disk accelerating through space on the back of a rocket propelled tortoise and the sun is small light source only 100 miles above the plane of the disk. It's really the B-ark space ship carrying away the descendants of the true earth's telephone sanitizers and hairdressers. Don't fall for the lies of "big globe" and their well paid "scientists".

Comment: Re:Actually I was quite happy about them doing it (Score 2) 179

by goombah99 (#48822617) Attached to: Marriot Back-Pedals On Wireless Blocking

Smoking in public spaces was as much your "right" not long ago. What the law allows is subject to renegotiation. In this case there is a compelling argument that unrealized value to the public might be had by controlling wifi access. There are also compelling arguments that say this could undermine some other virtues as well. After all this looks a little bit like the encroachments on net neutrality and compelling cases have been made for keeping the net open. But it may be you who is arrogant to assert that my arguments are specious by saying I'm taking your "right". It's just a regulation and one the FCC has already sought public comment on in contemplating changing it, so it's not really a "right".

Another example might be proposals to lightly tax stock trades to curb abuses by privledged high frequency trading networks . Is it your right to freely contract with others? Or would most people be better off if abuses of the market that skim your profits by advantaged traders were ended.

Creating a regulated market often allows greater access and use of themarket by the public. My original post noted that more people would benefit than lose. Peace of mind is not a trivial things when losing your gmail password can ruin you.

Comment: Re:Actually I was quite happy about them doing it (Score 1) 179

by goombah99 (#48822275) Attached to: Marriot Back-Pedals On Wireless Blocking

The easy solution would be simply to put a card on the nightstand giving the name of the safe hotspot you should connect to. And/or name the hotspot "Mariott Internet - all other hotspots should be avoided"

Warnings in my hotel room Do me no good in the lobby or bar or front desk when I'm trying to pull up my reservation on the e-mail.

So I gain peace of mind and lose nothing of value if they do this. Why should I not like this.
Well, aside from the $15/day they're charging you to connect, even if you already have your own personal hotspot anyway.

As I noted, blue tooth works fine for tethers. Blue tooth requires pairing so it's not anonymous like Wifi. USB is often convenient as well, especially when I'm charging things. Blocking wifi doesn't inconvenience me at all for tethering.

Comment: Re:Actually I was quite happy about them doing it (Score 1) 179

by goombah99 (#48821921) Attached to: Marriot Back-Pedals On Wireless Blocking

Even if they could make the case that all airwaves inside their hotel belonged to them, their blocking could affect people near their hotel as well. How can they tell that SOME_WIRELESS_HOTSPOT is located in one of their rooms as opposed to in another building right next door?

As a thought experiment, if they could technologically create a reliable perimeter to their blocking would you then be in favor of it?

Technically it is possible to do such a thing either by clever directional electronics or by simple agreement with the neighbors. They might not go that extra mile of course but they could, and in fact they pretty much would have to if their neighbors complained to the FCC. Furthermore, most of the marriots I have stayed in are isolated buildings so the strawman you describe would never occur at many of their locations.

Comment: Re:Actually I was quite happy about them doing it (Score 1) 179

by goombah99 (#48821477) Attached to: Marriot Back-Pedals On Wireless Blocking

Isn't this just the same as bars that jam cell phones. It's a customer service. People go there to escape their own ambient connectivity and the grating rudeness of person at the next table talking on their cell. It seems very logical to me that businesses should be able to control the airwaves in their own spaces.

Comment: Actually I was quite happy about them doing it (Score 4, Interesting) 179

by goombah99 (#48821363) Attached to: Marriot Back-Pedals On Wireless Blocking

I know I'll get hammered for saying I was in favor of what marroitt did but here me out. When I travel, I'm terrified of connecting to hotel networks. I don't really know which of the many possible SSIDs that I see are the bonified hotel network. And since it's normal on Hotel networks to do some DNS redirection to hand you off to the authorization site, you really can trust anything that masquerades in that way either.

Thus I'd gladly forego the trivial inconvenience of them blocking my wifi tether to my phone network (to bypass the hotel network), if they would take charge of their airwaves and block all rogue hotspots in their building. Peace of mind.

Now the litmus test here would be, are they just doing that to make money by taking away something I have for no extra cost (my cell phone tether) or do they really have my interests at heart in squelching hostile wifi hotspots? And that's really easy to figure out. If they allow short range blue tooth then they haven't taken anything away from me. I can still tether just as well as I could before.

So I gain peace of mind and lose nothing of value if they do this. Why should I not like this.

Now I suppose someone could dream up an edge case like say a LAN party or maybe some poor-mans meeting where one fellow is hosting all the others on his little conference room server. But that's so narrow a case ocmapred to the millions of guests all of whom just want a safe casual ad hoc connection to check their e-mail. Lan pary people too cheap to pay for the connection can probably figure a workaround anyhow.

Do you suffer painful hallucination? -- Don Juan, cited by Carlos Casteneda

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