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Comment: Re:As usual... (Score 1) 374

by aitikin (#49747051) Attached to: Student Photographer Threatened With Suspension For Sports Photos

This does make things a little more fuzzy. I wouldn't be surprised if a local professional photographer was already given an exclusive contract to sell photos. I doubt that vendors can just attend an event and sell something like hot dogs for instance without some kind of agreement.

That would mean the school would have to notify EVERY attendee with a camera that they are not allowed to sell photos due to an exclusivity contract. The only reason the student is in the wrong is if he were notified that such an arrangement exists and therefore he cannot sell them. Even then, I doubt such an arrangement is enforceable.

Comment: Re:As usual... (Score 1) 374

by aitikin (#49746565) Attached to: Student Photographer Threatened With Suspension For Sports Photos

As usual you are only hearing PART of the story. The real story is that this guy was selling the photos. And he was using school provided equipment. And he wasn't paying taxes.

Now you know the REST of the story.

I'd like your source for this. Why does it matter that he wasn't paying taxes? Did he sign a contract saying that he could not use school equipment for private profit? None of the information you've provided* changes the fact that he holds the copyrights.

*"provided" in this case indicating that you have stated it as fact with no supporting evidence.

Comment: What's up with that motor? (Score 3, Interesting) 110

by gman003 (#49723839) Attached to: Robotic Space Plane Launches In Mystery Mission This Week

Okay, I know it's probably the least important thing about the craft, but still...

Why are they using such an ancient, decrepit-ass rocket motor? The AR2-3 is incredibly old - it dates back to a Gemini-era trainer, basically a modded F-104 that NASA used for early tests and training for spaceflight. It was made back when rocket chemistry was still in the "even the experts don't know much" stage, so it burned jet fuel and high-test peroxide (90%+ H2O2 in H2O).

Jet fuel is not good for rockets - basically, the restrictions on what compounds can be present is fine for jet engines, but leads to horrible problems with rockets. There's a specific petroleum-product blend designed for rockets, called RP-1, which clamps down on things like sulfur compounds or alkenes that love to gum up the works. This rocket was originally used on a jet fighter and shared fuel with it, so that was understandable... but the USAF recertified the engine for modern JP-8 instead of the old JP-4. So they already went through the effort of making it work with a new but similar fuel. Unless the X-37 hides a jet engine on itself somewhere, I don't see why they couldn't have used RP-1 instead.

Further, rocket science moved away from peroxide for a reason - it's dangerous. It will explode for basically any reason - peroxide decomposes exothermically, so once it starts reverting to H2O + O2, it's nearly impossible to stop. And it reacts with tankage surprisingly often. Oh, and it does horrible things to your specific impulse, which really hurts you on a last-stage engine like this one.

Honestly, using the engine at all is a weird choice. Sure, maybe they had some laying around... from the sixties... but that's like putting an F-104 engine in a prototype aircraft, it just doesn't seem right when other off-the-shelf systems work better. An AJ-10 would have worked beautifully. An RL10 might not have fit the aero package (hydrogen is a bulky fuel), but would have given them some impressive dV if they wanted it. Aestus would be a perfect match as well, if they didn't mind outsourcing to the Euros. Even Kestrel would work (although it first flew around the same time as this, so understandable not to use it). Point is, they had options, and being the Air Force, they could easily have just had an engine custom-made for it if they so wanted.

So what are the implications? All I can think of is a) they don't care how badly the rocket performs, b) they probably aren't going to keep that engine in whatever "production" version they build, or c) they have some other reason to use peroxide or JP8. Maybe peroxide is also their monoprop for RCS? That isn't really worth it though, particularly when UDMH works better as RCS and in the main motor.

+ - Men's Rights Activists Call for Boycott of "Mad Max: Fury Road"

Submitted by ideonexus
ideonexus writes: Aaron Clarey, author of the blog Return of Kings and prominent figure in the Men's Rights Movement, is calling for a boycott of George Miller's new edition to the Mad Max franchise "Mad Max: Fury Road," calling the film a "Trojan Horse feminists and Hollywood leftists will use to (vainly) insist on the trope women are equal to men in all things..." and citing the fact that "Vagina Monologues" author Eve Ensler was brought in to coach the actresses on playing sex slaves who escape a warlord's possession. Critics have been applauding the film, which currently scores 98% on RottenTomatoes.

Comment: Re:Typo: Digital Rights Management (Score 1) 371

by gman003 (#49686739) Attached to: Firefox 38 Arrives With DRM Required To Watch Netflix

Do you understand the difference between "has to be" and "can be"?

Steam is in charge of downloading and installing the game. After that, you can launch it directly.

If, and only if, the game was coded to additionally use Steam's DRM features, it will then check that Steam is running and attempt to authenticate (which can be as simple as the local Steam instance having a cached authentication).

If it doesn't use Steam's DRM, it will just run as a regular old executable. Steam does not mandate ANY DRM, it only mandates that if you use non-Steam DRM, you have to make a note of it on your store page.

I have dozens of games bought and downloaded on Steam that do not touch Steam's DRM. I've actually copied some of them over to other computers and had it still work without Steam even being installed.

Comment: Re:It was an app on a WORK-Issued Phone! (Score 1) 776

by aitikin (#49677203) Attached to: Worker Fired For Disabling GPS App That Tracked Her 24 Hours a Day

Being a civil suit, she doesn't even have to convince a majority - just 9 of the 12 jurors.

I do not think that word means what you think it means...

Oh it means what they said. Civil suits only require a simple majority of the jurors to agree with you. Criminal Juries must be 100%, civil juries only require more votes for one side than the other.

A majority would be any number greater than 6 (AKA anything more than 50%), not 9 of the 12 jurors (75%)...

Comment: Rust is putting the cart before the horse (Score 3, Interesting) 386

by gman003 (#49676811) Attached to: Criticizing the Rust Language, and Why C/C++ Will Never Die

Rust is not yet production-usable. It has enough known bugs in the tracker that I can't even contemplate using it for a personal project, let alone for real.

And yet they're already pushing the marketing, proclaiming it as a guaranteed C-killer. I'm sorry, but they've said that about every compiled language since C, and it hasn't been true for one of them. And you're pushing it this hard, when you're still this early along in development?

Nobody uses C or C++ because they love the language. They use it because it has all the tools they need to debug, and all the libraries they need to run, and all the performance they need for the task. Rust maybe has the last one, but only has the second by being C-compatible (defeating the purpose of using a new language, particularly when you have to write this much wrapper code around it) and has none of infrastructure needed for large modern projects.

Dear Rust devs: stop writing articles about how great Rust will be, and start writing stuff to make your language actually usable. Maybe then people with their heads outside their asses will listen to you.

Comment: Re:Typo: Digital Rights Management (Score 2) 371

by gman003 (#49675985) Attached to: Firefox 38 Arrives With DRM Required To Watch Netflix

Steam itself doesn't universally apply DRM - a large number of games on Steam don't have DRM at all, you can just copy the files to wherever you want and run them.

They do offer their own DRM, which is about as non-intrusive as you can get while still being DRM, and they allow publishers to include their own DRM as long as it is noted on the store page. You can be mad about games using DRM, but Valve isn't the one to be angry at.

PS: Valve's talked about issuing a patch to disable the DRM if they ever go out of business. Realistically that probably won't happen (too many licensing problems), but the DRM is trivially bypassed as long as you have the game downloaded already, so they really can't stop it.

Comment: Re:run constantly on her COMPANY ISSUED iPhone (Score 1) 776

I can't see where it says that in the article but I can see

FTA:

A Central California woman claims she was fired after uninstalling an app that her employer required her to run constantly on her company issued iPhone —an app that tracked her every move 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

emphasis mine.

Comment: Re:It was an app on a WORK-Issued Phone! (Score 1) 776

It was her phone. Why would she do that?

Where do you see that it was her phone? TFA reads:

A Central California woman claims she was fired after uninstalling an app that her employer required her to run constantly on her company issued iPhone—an app that tracked her every move 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Being a civil suit, she doesn't even have to convince a majority - just 9 of the 12 jurors.

I do not think that word means what you think it means...

Comment: Re:5 year lag pretty good (Score 5, Informative) 268

by gman003 (#49660807) Attached to: Russian Company Unveils Homegrown PC Chips

Sadly, their brags of "only five years behind" is an underestimate. It's a 65nm chip - its heyday was 2006-2007, on tail-end Pentium IVs, early Core 2, and Phenoms. 45nm hit in 2008, followed by 32nm in 2010. In 2012 Intel hit 22nm, but most others were on a 28nm half-node. Currently, 14nm is shipping from some vendors, and the rest are gearing up for it.

Account for the fact that these chips most likely won't actually be delivered until 2016, and you'll see they're really 10 years behind, not 5. That will probably still be fine for desktops or industrial use, but mobile is out, and servers will be very inefficient compared to modern ones.

+ - China to Rate Citizens in 'Social Credit System' Using Online Behavioral Data->

Submitted by ideonexus
ideonexus writes: A recently published translation of a document circulated through various levels of the Chinese government outlines a plan to establish a "Social Credit System" that will assign a rating to each citizen based on their criminal record, credit record, and--most interestingly--morality based at least in part on online behavioral data harvested from sites like "Alibaba, Baidu and Tencent." Observed behaviors, such as whether a citizen spends their money on diapers or video games, will be used to determine which citizens best exemplify the "socialist core values."
Link to Original Source

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