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Comment: Re:As usual... (Score 1) 372

by aitikin (#49747051) Attached to: Student Photographer Threatened With Suspension For Sports Photos

This does make things a little more fuzzy. I wouldn't be surprised if a local professional photographer was already given an exclusive contract to sell photos. I doubt that vendors can just attend an event and sell something like hot dogs for instance without some kind of agreement.

That would mean the school would have to notify EVERY attendee with a camera that they are not allowed to sell photos due to an exclusivity contract. The only reason the student is in the wrong is if he were notified that such an arrangement exists and therefore he cannot sell them. Even then, I doubt such an arrangement is enforceable.

Comment: Re:As usual... (Score 1) 372

by aitikin (#49746565) Attached to: Student Photographer Threatened With Suspension For Sports Photos

As usual you are only hearing PART of the story. The real story is that this guy was selling the photos. And he was using school provided equipment. And he wasn't paying taxes.

Now you know the REST of the story.

I'd like your source for this. Why does it matter that he wasn't paying taxes? Did he sign a contract saying that he could not use school equipment for private profit? None of the information you've provided* changes the fact that he holds the copyrights.

*"provided" in this case indicating that you have stated it as fact with no supporting evidence.

Comment: Re:It was an app on a WORK-Issued Phone! (Score 1) 776

by aitikin (#49677203) Attached to: Worker Fired For Disabling GPS App That Tracked Her 24 Hours a Day

Being a civil suit, she doesn't even have to convince a majority - just 9 of the 12 jurors.

I do not think that word means what you think it means...

Oh it means what they said. Civil suits only require a simple majority of the jurors to agree with you. Criminal Juries must be 100%, civil juries only require more votes for one side than the other.

A majority would be any number greater than 6 (AKA anything more than 50%), not 9 of the 12 jurors (75%)...

Comment: Re:run constantly on her COMPANY ISSUED iPhone (Score 1) 776

I can't see where it says that in the article but I can see

FTA:

A Central California woman claims she was fired after uninstalling an app that her employer required her to run constantly on her company issued iPhone —an app that tracked her every move 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

emphasis mine.

Comment: Re:It was an app on a WORK-Issued Phone! (Score 1) 776

It was her phone. Why would she do that?

Where do you see that it was her phone? TFA reads:

A Central California woman claims she was fired after uninstalling an app that her employer required her to run constantly on her company issued iPhone—an app that tracked her every move 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Being a civil suit, she doesn't even have to convince a majority - just 9 of the 12 jurors.

I do not think that word means what you think it means...

Comment: Re:Agreed but there is a point (Score 2) 341

by aitikin (#49524293) Attached to: Study Confirms No Link Between MMR Vaccine and Autism

There is also something particular to Chicken Pox which makes the vaccine even less desirable: length of immunity. If you actually catch Chicken Pox you get immunity for life. However if you vaccinate against it you need to continuously remember to get boosters - I believe currently every 10 or 20 years - otherwise your immunity may lapse. What is bad about this is that Chicken Pox for adults is known as Shingles which is far nastier than Chicken Pox. So in this case taking the vaccine to protect against a very mild childhood disease may lead to an increased chance of a more serious disease later in life...unless you set a 20 year alarm so you never forget a booster shot!

You're full of shit too. You speak as though getting chickenpox will prevent shingles which it won't and there's other things that you have claimed that I find to be...less than accurate but don't have the time to find sources so I won't claim them.

Comment: Re:They're called trees. (Score 1) 128

by aitikin (#49493597) Attached to: Breakthrough In Artificial Photosynthesis Captures CO2 In Acetate

Mind you, this doesn't speak for the third world (where firewood for heat and cooking is an actual thing, farming is a growth industry, not to mention the exotic hardwood cutting), and definitely doesn't speak for Europe and Asia (where the former has few forests left, and the latter is largely ignored and therefore unregulated for the most part).

Bob Taylor has done some wonderful work in making the "exotic hardwood cutting" sustainable. It's incredible what would happen before.

Comment: Who controls movie ratings? (Score 2) 128

by aitikin (#49296941) Attached to: Why Is the Grand Theft Auto CEO Also Chairman of the ESRB?
As I recall, the MPAA rates movies in America...why should the video game industry be considered at fault for having someone who is at the head of their industry be faulted when the movie industry isn't? Aren't people supposed to be encouraging the "self-regulation of the free market" or something like that?

Comment: Re:Or maybe it's because (Score 1) 114

by aitikin (#49286991) Attached to: Stanford Study Credits Lack of Non-Competes For Silicon Valley's Success
The implication (at least that I get) is that people who are creative and inventive thinkers will immigrate to California because (at least in their eyes) if it doesn't work out, they can just quit and find another job because there's no non-compete clause. I know when I signed my contract for my current position, I was very wary of the fact that there was a non-compete clause, but then I realized what any first year law student would in looking at my job and the non-compete, it's completely unenforceable.

The degree of technical confidence is inversely proportional to the level of management.

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