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Comment: Re:TLDR; 2D arrays wit a ton of spares are reliabl (Score 1) 186

by Kjella (#48932391) Attached to: Proposed Disk Array With 99.999% Availablity For 4 Years, Sans Maintenance

Even if the mean time between failures for consumer drives was 6 months, the odds of 'popping' two more spares in the month after the first failure would be less than 3%. If the MTBF is 1 year the probability drops to 0.7%.

Except if you got a bad batch where some kind of material or production defect will cause many disks to fail near simultaneously. The overall MTBF might be true for all the disks they produce, but unless you make a real effort to source them from different batches over time you can't assume that's going to be your MTBF.

Comment: Re:What complete and utter bullshit. (Score 1) 213

by Kjella (#48928589) Attached to: Anonymous No More: Your Coding Style Can Give You Away

What complete and utter bullshit.

95% of 250 coders. That means that out of a million programmers they will misidentify 200000.

You know it's not a contest to come up with the worst bullshit. If you're left with one person 95% of the time when you have 249 possible wrong answers, it's like being left with 4000 people when you have 999999 wrong answers. If all those are too close to tell apart you'll misidentify >99.9%.

Imagine for example that you wanted to find people by height and weight, as measured to nearest cm and kilo. It might work decently on a small group, but if you scale it up to a million people there'll be a lot of duplicates and then you're just guessing, double the population and you halve the chance of being right.

Comment: Re:Uh, okay? (Score 2) 348

by Kjella (#48927323) Attached to: Why Screen Lockers On X11 Cannot Be Secure

It doesn't bode well for Linux that it is also not the year of the Windows Desktop or Apple Desktop. It is the year of the smart phone. The year of the desktop may never return. Desktops are better suited for developers and smart phones are better suited to consumers.

Developers and a ton of other professionals. If Linux/FLOSS could replace Windows, Office, Outlook/Exchange, Sharepoint and SQL Server that's probably 15 of Microsoft's $26 billion dollar revenue. Open source has not managed to commodify basic business and collaboration tasks, despite so many years of trying. It's not all about smartphones and tablets.

Comment: Re:18B on 75B (Score 1) 496

by Kjella (#48921981) Attached to: Apple Posts $18B Quarterly Profit, the Highest By Any Company, Ever

That is 24%. That means your device could be 20% cheaper and they would STILL make more money then anybody else in percentage per product in the electronics world. So instead of 500USD for the Ipad2, you could be paying 400USD and they would still make money. And some people don't think Apple is overpriced.

Don't worry, you can buy a $500 phone from my non-profit, $400 will be my for salary and $100 for a junk Android phone. Profit is an indication that you're delivering more value relative to cost than the competition, after all sales price is just a number you decide. They're not competing against some imaginary non-profit, the day Google, Microsoft etc. deliver a competing product forcing them to lower prices they will. Until then, keep blaming the one delivering what people want and not the ones who don't.

Comment: Huh? (Score 1) 226

by Black Parrot (#48920405) Attached to: Gamma-ray Bursts May Explain Fermi's Paradox

GRBs clearly haven't prevented life in *our* galaxy, so the Fermi Paradox still stands.

The caluculations probably rule out life in the core of our galaxy, but systems further out would be exposed even less often than ours is. And even though GRBs can periodically sterilize a planet, their directionality means that one burst would not likely sterilize all the planets in an intercellar civilization simultaneously.

So, to modify what someone said above, we can add another term to the Drake equation, but this doesn't do much to answer Fermi.

Comment: Re:Do you trust them? (Score 2) 145

by Kjella (#48918355) Attached to: New Google Fiber Cities Announced

Do you trust them?

...less than any other ISP? No. Just like Google funded Mozilla this is more of a long term effort to push more people and more services online, where Google can get a piece of it. The "old media" advertising budgets are still pretty huge and people willingly sign up to Google's services so there's no need to get shady. In fact their roll-out is extremely slow if they were seriously intending to become a major ISP, they're really just trying to shame the rest of the country into demanding they get the same kind of service from their incumbents. Who needs cable TV when you got gigabit service and can watch any show, any time over streaming without hitting any caps? That's what Google is selling, of course it's out of self-interest but for tech geeks I think they're on our side in this case.

Comment: Re:Unity? (Score 2) 31

by squiggleslash (#48917429) Attached to: Game Hack-A-Thon Attracts Teams At 500+ Sites Worldwide

Also they shouldn't use these silly "C" compiler thingies, instead they should use a couple of wires to short circuit a PCB until the program is in memory!

I think using a game engine is perfectly acceptable in 2015. I don't think we're going to get an avalance of original game ideas if we force everyone who has a great idea for something to learn OpenGL and DirectX.

Comment: Re:Price (Score 1) 4

by squiggleslash (#48916233) Attached to: Is the Touch UI irredeemable?

There really was an argument, I was there, I heard people get very angry about it. You can dismiss them as neckbeards, but the two major users of (IBM/Clone) PCs at that time were business users and computer enthusiasts of all ages, and both were hesitant to use WIMP interfaces.

The PC1512, that I mentioned, wasn't wonderful (6MHz 8086 IIRC, which while better than 4.77MHz 8088 was still hardly a speed demon), but GEM on it was smooth, more or less an equal to the Atari ST in performance. But few people touched GEM. The feeling was that GEM was easy to use but it was getting in the way.

What happened in 1990 wasn't that computers got cheap enough to tolerably run a GUI OS. Macs, Amigas, Atari STs, and GEM-running PCs predate 1990 considerably. What happened was that in 1990 IBM PC clones became available that tolerably ran a multitasking WIMP OS.

Comment: Why make up a conspiracy theory? (Score 1) 392

by Salamander (#48915221) Attached to: "Mammoth Snow Storm" Underwhelms

If you think weather forecasting is easy, let's see some of your forecasts. A forecast which has been substantially correct for New England and merely didn't extend as far south as had been expected only underscores the difficulty of the exercise. Occam's Razor suggests that no cause beyond "honest mistake" need be posited. I know some people like to take every opportunity to prattle on about government overreach, but you're *really* stretching that fabric too thin this time. Get a grip.

Comment: Quality Journalimism (Score 5, Insightful) 392

by American AC in Paris (#48914945) Attached to: "Mammoth Snow Storm" Underwhelms

"You heard the scare-mongering"

"Promised "2-3 feet" snow"

"government's overreach"

Congratulations, Timothy. Today's the day I take Slashdot up on its longstanding offer to disable advertising, and it's all because of you!

Because honestly, y'all don't deserve money for this level of pabulum.

Nothing succeeds like the appearance of success. -- Christopher Lascl

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