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Submission + - New HTTPS Bicycle Attack Reveals Details About Passwords From Encrypted Traffic (softpedia.com)

campuscodi writes: Dutch security researcher Guido Vranken has published a paper [PDF] in which he details a new attack on TLS/SSL-encrypted traffic, one that can potentially allow attackers to extract some information from HTTPS data streams. Attackers could extract the length of a password from TLS packets, and then use this information to simplify brute-force attacks. The new HTTPS Bicycle Attack can also be used retroactively on HTTPS traffic logged several years ago. Hello NSA!

Submission + - /.Deals is a scam (bbb.org)

slashdeal_sucker writes: Slash deals appears to have great geeky gadgets. Don't fall for it. They took my money, fedex says the tracking number they sent to me was for stuff sent to an address and and addressee that is not me. There customer support is non-responsive.

Submission + - New heights of Republican Idiocy: Blame Mark-1 the Plumber (nytimes.com)

hydrodog writes: A Texas plumber traded in his truck, which ends up in ISIS videos showing his logo and phone number. So he is getting hundreds of harrassing phone calls for "supporting ISIS" when what he did was give it to a dealer who didn't bother taking off his labels.

I would love to say this is out of character, but that wouldn't be true. I'm waiting for the Donald to declare him public enemy number 1.

Submission + - Programmer creates online library with every book that has/could be written (relativelyinteresting.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The digital Library of Babel contains all possible permutations that can exist in 3,200 characters in the English language. Because of that, it contains all possible conversations you could have, have had, or will have, all possible scenarios of your death, and even this entire article.

The digital “The Library of Babel” is based on the short story by Jorge Borges. The library houses all the possible combinations of the letters of the alphabet, plus some punctuation, in 410 page long novels. The librarians are incredibly excited about the endless possibilities the library presents to them. The tomes essentially contain every one’s death, birth, all written books, and all yet un-written books. The problem with all of this, however, is the enormity of the library.

Article: http://www.relativelyinteresti... and the library itself https://libraryofbabel.info/

Comment How about (Score 2) 3

A standard reply to any request for assistance:

I'm sorry but I did not work directly on the matter no did I obtain any knowledge regarding said matter while I was working at SunTrust.

With Love, former employee who you are trying to screw over.

PS. If the code monkeys you are now paying peanuts cannot work the system, perhaps you should employ better people - oh wait, you had that.

Comment Re:Is that a misstatement? (Score 1) 2

What is worse is when the company puts on extra middle managers to handle the extra projects without putting on extra developers (because they are an expense that needs to be kept to a minimum), then introduce agile development and declare everyone is a developer so they don't need to employ more devs.

I hate my job

Submission + - How Steve Jobs Outsmarted Carly Fiorino

HughPickens.com writes: Carly Fiorina likes to boast about her friendship with Apple founder Steve Jobs but Fortune Magazine reports that it turns out Carly may have outfoxed of by Apple's late leader. In January 2004, Steve Jobs and Carly Fiorina cut a deal where HP could slap its name on Apple’s wildly successful iPod and sell it through HP retail channels but HP still managed to botch things up. The MP3 player worked just like a regular iPod, but it had HP's logo on the back and in return HP agreed to continue pre-loading iTunes onto its PCs. According to Steven Levy soon after the deal with HP was inked, Apple upgraded the iPod, making HP’s version outdated and because of Fiorina’s deal HP was banned from selling its own music player until August 2006. "This was a highly strategic move to block HP/Compaq from installing Windows Media Store on their PCs," says one Apple source. "We wanted iTunes Music store to be a definitive winner. Steve only did this deal because of that."

In short, Fiorina’s “good friend” Steve Jobs blithely mugged her and HP’s shareholders. By getting Fiorina to adopt the iPod as HP’s music player, Jobs had effectively gotten his software installed on millions of computers for free, stifled his main competitor, and gotten a company that prided itself on invention to declare that Apple was a superior inventor. And he lost nothing, except the few minutes it took him to call Carly Fiorina and say he was sorry she got canned. Levy concludes that Carly's experience with her "good friend" Steve Jobs is not an encouraging precedent for a person who wants to deal with Vladimir Putin. "It could not have been otherwise, really, because Steve Jobs totally outsmarted the woman who now claims she can run the United States of America."

Submission + - This is What a Real Bomb Looks Like (hackaday.com) 2

szczys writes: You see them all the time in movies and TV shows, but is that what an actual bomb looks like? Probably not... here's what a real bomb looks like.

This story stems from a millionaire gone bust from gambling addiction who decided to extort riches back from the casino. He built a bomb and got it into the building, then ransomed the organization for $3 million. The FBI documented the mechanisms in great detail — including the 8 independent trigger systems that made it impossible for them to disarm the thing. The design was so nefarious it's still used today as a training tool.

Comment Way to go (Score 1) 1

So, who are the people that are causing the terror? Is is the smart kid who can make a digital clock in his spare time? Or is it the uneducated (or mainstream media educated) teachers who scream 9/11 and terrorist and bomb whenever they are presented with something they don't understand. This kid should be given a merit award, and the teacher should be given some lessons in how not to be a fear mongerer.

Submission + - 9th grader detained after police mistake clock for fake bomb (dallasnews.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: 14-year-old Ahmed Mohamed, a freshman at MacArthur High School in Irving, was taken in handcuffs to juvenile detention by police for creating clock. Police say they may charge him with making a hoax bomb though they acknowledge he told everyone who would listen that it’s a clock.

Submission + - Firefox's Secret Requests 1

An anonymous reader writes: Unlike older versions of Firefox, more recent versions will make a request to a destination server just by hovering over a link. No CSS and no javascript needed. Try it for yourself. Disable CSS and javascript in Firefox and fire up iftop, hover over some links and watch the fun begin. There once was a time when you hovered over a link to check the "real link" before you clicked on it. Well no more. Just looking at it makes a 'secret request'.

Submission + - New definition of extremist: 'Anybody who challenges the established order' (rt.com)

An anonymous reader writes: I think this all fits in with what’s been happening here in Britain because the government has got this new so-called ‘counter extremism initiative.’ They want to bring in a bill and their definition of ‘extremism’ is deliberately designed to bring in people who challenge the established order. Of course it’s not just simply about terrorists; it’s about anybody who criticizes the capitalist system, anybody who poses any kind of challenge, and anybody who wants to protest against the existing very unfair economic system that we’ve got in Britain. This is worrying, this is dangerous.

Submission + - Google Photos keeps collecting your pictures even after you delete the Android (theverge.com)

brianstdreger writes: If you dabbled with Google Photos when it was launched last month but decided it wasn't for you, make sure you also turn photo backup off in your Android phone's Google Settings menu, or else you'll continue uploading new pictures to the service. Nashville Business Journal writer David A. Arnott discovered the quirk when hundreds of family photos appeared on Google Photos, even when he'd deleted the pictures and uninstalled the app itself from his phone.

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