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Comment Surplus (Score 1) 292 292

We're collectively producing more rice than we eat. Japan is stockpiling unused rice every year, and the world markets are flooded with cheap rice. Food insufficiency (starvation, malnutrition) is currently a problem of resource allocation, not production.

At the same time, the consumers in the big rice consuming countries aren't eating just "rice". You can typically find many dozens of very specific breeds of rice with differences in flavour, texture, firmness, size and so on. And that's within a single type (Japonica, say).

I suspect this would only be useful for rice grown for feed or as an industrial crop. But for feed, source of starch and so on there are already other, well entrenched crops available, so I don't see much of a practical impact of this development.

Comment No One Knows What to Put There Instead (Score 1) 683 683

You'd prefer this, maybe?

That abomination was the keyboard Lenovo inflicted on the world on their Thinkpad Carbon X1 (2nd. gen). This presumably was green-lit by the same Very Serious People who approved the bundling of the SuperFish on "select" laptops.

Lenovo seems to have since learned their lesson; the Carbon X1 3rd gen has a proper keyboard, and proper buttons above the touchpad.

Comment Re:A simple proposition. (Score 1) 375 375

What is the alternate solution? Are you willing to pay for a subscription to every site you visit? Do you want more "native content" intermixed with all these articles?

Or, you know, less content. It's not as if we're all sitting around wishing there was more stuff on the internet to read, right?

We pay a monthly subscription for our online daily newspaper. I occasionally pay for things such as printed anthologies of online comics I follow, buy books by authors whose blogs and articles I read. I subscribe to a couple of websites.

At one end there is high-quality content such as newspapers (which is high quality in my home country) and other stuff like I listed above. Stuff that is good enough that people really do want to pay for it.

At the other end a lot of people out there are creating good stuff completely for free. You've got academics, programmers and other professionals with a day job that write to spread what they learn. You've got hobbyists sharing their passion. Small businesses publishing good stuff to promote their name and skills. Factual events are widely and freely reported.

The content farms, clickbait sites and the rest out there is squeezed between these two. The high-quality stuff sets the bar for what people expect in order to part with their money. The free stuff sets the bar on what people accept before they abandon you and leave for better sources.

If your business depends on having so much advertising that it drives people to block stuff or leave, then you have no business being in business at all.

Comment YHBT. YHL. HAND. (Score 0) 434 434

Yet another malicious, deliberately inaccurate "leak" from Trey Gowdy's "investigation" into BENGHAZI!!!!1! (at least the seventh such investigation so far).

Here's what we know about this most recent "story" so far: http://www.dailykos.com/story/...

Oh, and explain to me again why this is on /. ? I thought this site was about tech and tech-related news. Could it be there's rank partisanship among the editorial staff? I mean, I can't recall seeing any front-page stories here about the comprehensive corruption of, say, Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker who, among other things, installed a secret WiFi router in his office so he could exchange email out of sight of mandatory records keeping laws. I mean, that's tech-related, right? Right??

Comment Re:Cortana? (Score 1) 44 44

The nature of mobile devices is that the data connection is of varying quality and reliability, and in some places either slow, intermittent, or non-existent. Relying on apps in the cloud means that your device is fundamentally a brick whenever you go into an underpass or a basement or into mountains and forests. Of course, if you live your whole life in urban areas this may not matter, but for many people it does. Not that this is a criticism of Cortana, or of Microsoft. Google's and Apple's voice services are cloud-backed as well. But for 'the network is the computer' to work, the network has to be ubiquitous and immanent, and for mobile devices it isn't.
United Kingdom

Man Arrested After Charging iPhone On London Overground Train 674 674

An anonymous reader writes: 45-year-old Robin Lee was arrested after he used a socket on a London Overground train to charge up his iPhone. He was handcuffed and arrested for "abstracting electricity". Robin was then charged with "unacceptable behaviour" after "becoming aggressive" when objecting to his first arrest. The Guardian reports: "Speaking to the Evening Standard, Lee said he had been confronted by a police community support officer on the overground train from Hackney Wick to Camden Road on 10 July. The Overground is part of Transport For London’s wider network that also includes London Underground and the buses. 'She said I’m abstracting electricity. She kept saying it’s a crime. We were just coming into the station and there happened to be about four police officers on the platform. She called to them and said: ‘This guy’s been abstracting electricity, he needs to be arrested’.”

Comment Re:Scratching your head? (Score 1) 107 107

How the hell did the motor manufacturer prevent the flight?

As you say, it's a prototype on loan for testing, and the contract terms explicitly say Siemens get to say what they can and can't do with it.

The Airbus thing is complete bull; they'd have zero interest in preventing a test flight like this, and plenty of professional interest in seeing it fly.

United States

Proposed Regulation Could Keep 3D-printed Gun Blueprints Offline For Good 423 423

SonicSpike sends a report on a proposed update to the International Traffic in Arms (ITAR) regulations which could shut down the sharing of files for 3D printed gun parts over the internet. "Hidden within the proposal, which restricts what gear, technology, and info can and cannot be exported out of the U.S., is a ban on posting schematics for 3D printed gun parts online." This follows a lawsuit from Cody Wilson and Defense Distributed back in May fighting the federal government's command to remove blueprints for the "Liberator" 3D-printed gun from their website. A senior official at the U.S. State Department said, "By putting up a digital file, that constitutes an export of the data. If it's an executable digital file, any foreign interests can get a hold of it."

Comment Re:Not Exactly.... (Score 2) 487 487

...when you connect to a new network, there's a "share with my contacts" checkbox that you have to turn ON for this network to be shared.

If true, this would be a departure from the Windows Phone 8.1 OEM requirements, which requires OEMs to fully enable this, "killer feature:" https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-...

Comment Re:Bad Summary, Only new part is the sharing optio (Score 5, Interesting) 487 487

First, we're only talking Windows 10 PHONE

ERROR: INCORRECT

First: This is in Windows 10 desktop, as detailed here, complete with screenshots: http://www.howtogeek.com/21970...

Second: Even if this were only confined to Windows Phone 10, it would still be monumentally stupid.

Comment Re:third solution the MS doesn't want to mention (Score 3, Insightful) 487 487

ERROR: INCOMPLETE SOLUTION

There is no provision in this "killer feature" that establishes whether the person doing the sharing is the network administrator, i.e. the person who grants authorization to use their network. So if you share your WAP credentials with a friend, and that friend uses Windows 10 with Wi-Fi Sense enabled, than that friend has just compromised your WAP.

If at first you don't succeed, you must be a programmer.

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