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Comment: Other devices used to do that (Score 1) 122

I'm completely spit-balling here, but what if each component needing drivers brought their own?

Yes, just like each computer peripheral you bought used to come with a CD - that you had to toss and download an updated version of because your OS had changed since the CD was made... which would remain true of the OS vis-a-vis whatever driver shipped on the physical node.

So it would be no different, you'd be constantly managing drivers.

Comment: Re:Gorilla Glass is pretty strong (Score 1) 181

by SuperKendall (#46825013) Attached to: How Apple's Billion Dollar Sapphire Bet Will Pay Off

Like I said, I've not had a phone scratched in any way for the last few iPhone models - I keep it in an pocket with keys and sometimes other things, and never use a screen protector. I'm sure sapphire is even more durable, but Gorilla Glass is already quite impressive as far as scratch resistance.

You're right that screens cracking is a real issue, but possibly they have figured out how to treat the sapphire so it's even better in that regard. It may also feel better though that's totally speculation.

Comment: Gorilla Glass is pretty strong (Score 2) 181

by SuperKendall (#46820543) Attached to: How Apple's Billion Dollar Sapphire Bet Will Pay Off

It's surprising that Apple didn't do this a long time ago.

It's not if you read the article and know more about the costs Sapphire have traditionally added.

It's embarassing how fragile Apple's mobile products are.

You mean, the ones that use the same Gorilla Glass everyone else is using?

Sapphire does sound nice, but you are selling Gorilla Glass way short. It can take a lot of pounding, and I haven't had keys (or anything else) be able to scratch the display in years. I recall a model of the iPhone a few years ago where a YouTube review showed things like shaking the phone in a bag of keys, and the screen was untouched.

I have no doubt whatever comes next will be better, but I wouldn't say mobile devices suffer from overly delicate screens anymore.

Comment: Re:Illustrates the need for more H1B visas (Score 1) 178

by Tablizer (#46816631) Attached to: Tech People Making $100k a Year On the Rise, Again

The problem is that the H1B's are not sent home if the economy or IT crashes. When the econ crashes, H1B's will often work for desperate wages/hours so they won't be sent home while trying to find a better gig, clogging up the limited jobs for citizens.

Further, I doubt most H1B's are paid the higher salaries, for the very reason most companies use them is for cheaper labor that have no families and work long hours.

Comment: Re:Philosophy is the opposite of mathematics (Score 1) 280

by mangu (#46814029) Attached to: Our Education System Is Failing IT

I took a philosophy course and an engineering degree. After working 30 years in engineering, I can tell for sure that philosophy is NOT the answer to engineering problems.

If too many people working on IT are under trained, you may blame the education system for failing to provide them with enough training in that field, not for failing to provide them education in totally unrelated fields.

Comment: Philosophy is the opposite of mathematics (Score 0) 280

by mangu (#46813809) Attached to: Our Education System Is Failing IT

Philosophy to come up with the right argument and psychology to make it stick

Unfortunately, philosophy is very far from coming with the right argument. I took a philosophy course in college, to "broaden" my outlook, and it had the exact opposite effect. Read any text by a philosopher, and in the end you'll get to the conclusion that perhaps there could be one or two good ideas there, if it had been written in a hundred words instead of a hundred pages. That's why sometimes a philosopher seems so smart to the uninitiated, they have read only the aphorisms and quotations, they have never had to pore through a full book written by a philosopher.

IT is a field for many different specialists. In the most common forms, what is needed is an expertise in human interfaces, we need graphics designers to create the screens and writers to create the documentation. In that sense, yes, it's all about expertise in the humanities. The vast majority of IT work in development is about personal and corporate software, of which data input and presentation is the bulk of the thing.

Logic and mathematics, although it's behind every software, is a very small part of the development job. However, it cannot be totally disregarded, because it's an essential part.

There's the dilemma we face. We cannot just exempt people working in IT from training in the essential parts most of them will never use, because we never know when those skills will be needed.

Those programmers who say "I've never used a differential equation" are people who slept through their calculus courses and cheated at the exams. If you are simulating pitching a ball or you are calculating the profits from an investment fund you are using differential equations, and you should know how to do the job. Unless you work for a big company, you cannot be assured that the only things you'll ever need to do is drawing screens and writing manuals.

Comment: Terrorists, not tourists (Score 1) 228

I guess the memo had a misspelling. The wheel wells seem to be a good place for terrorists, not for tourists.

If someone can sneak up to the plane and climb in, it should be equally easy to put a bomb there. If a 16-year-old can find a way to squeeze into that space, it wouldn't be too difficult to fit in a couple hundred pounds of explosives.

Comment: Re:I've grappled with the ethics of CS for 20 year (Score 2) 169

by Tablizer (#46811495) Attached to: The Ethical Dilemmas Today's Programmers Face

I don't want to go into details, but basically it was we actually used component brand X to build an application with when the customer wanted brand Y. I never learned why they were picky about such, for as far as I could tell it didn't matter much. Either way, there was not enough time to recode it and rather than tell the customer, my boss & owner wanted me to lie with them.

Comment: Re:I've grappled with the ethics of CS for 20 year (Score 3, Interesting) 169

by Tablizer (#46811383) Attached to: The Ethical Dilemmas Today's Programmers Face

You are putting words into my mouth. Basically I'm saying that IF you want to change behavior on a large scale, you need to find a way to change the reward system(s) on a large scale.

Nagging people to "be good" and accept the down-sides of honesty for altruistic reasons alone will not work well in the longer run. I'm not saying whether asking them to do such is good or bad, I am only saying it won't work on a large scale. I'm trying to explain it in terms of cause and effect rather than give it a good/bad value judgement.

X will change Z but Y won't change Z. Whether doing Y is "good" even though it won't change Z is another issue that I didn't address either way.

Comment: Re:I've grappled with the ethics of CS for 20 year (Score 5, Insightful) 169

by Tablizer (#46810627) Attached to: The Ethical Dilemmas Today's Programmers Face

Those options don't scale. Honest people will receive less resources and have less influence and perhaps have less children, leaving the world full of slimebags and enablers of slimebags.

It's probably why so many slimebags exist today. If you want to solve the issue on a large scale, you need to find a way to change the system(s) to not reward slimebags, not rely on futile individual volunteerism.

You can not get anything worthwhile done without raising a sweat. -- The First Law Of Thermodynamics

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