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Comment: Re:Yes, just like that. (Score 2) 221

by terjeber (#47971693) Attached to: Outlining Thin Linux

with the underlying notion that Server 2012 is doing something revolutionary

Not to defend the original AC, but me thinks you did not read his entire post. It opens with: "We used to run linux in the server room because it was lean and easy to admin. Windows was slow, mousy, and dependencies were hellish."

Stating that he claims the new headless developments in Windows Server are new (in general, obviously new to Windows) or revolutionary is disingenuous at best. What I get from what he is actually writing is that while Linux has been moving towards bloat and cr@p, or moving towards becoming Windows-y if you will, Windows has been doing the opposite, trying to become more Unix-y. That is clearly the case, isn't it? Even Linus thinks Linux is bloated.

Microsoft was never a real Server-OS vendor so that they took a while to "get it" shouldn't be surprising. The fact that they are now eating their own medicine (in Azure) probably has a lot to do with it. Heck, it isn't that long ago that all of microsoft.com ran on Sun. Once it stopped, unsurprisingly both IIS and Windows Server suddenly received significant improvements - for those of us who prefer low-footprint server operating systems.

Comment: Re:Change Jobs (Score 1) 275

by dave562 (#47950469) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How To Avoid Becoming a Complacent Software Developer?

I agree with changing jobs.

At a certain point, you have to realize that you are in a no win situation and move on. The only way to affect change in your current organization is to leave. If enough people follow your lead, senior management will realize that your manager is a problem and deal with them. That will be too little, too late in your specific case, but the company will be better in the long run.

If you really are a good programmer, you can go to work anywhere. There is a serious shortage of good programmers in the world. By good programmers I mean people who inherently get programming. I do not mean people who happen to be able to develop apps in a single language.

Once you get burnt out with programming, aspire to be the manager or executive that you always wished that you could work for. Cultivate an environment in which other programmers can thrive and succeed. Find a company that needs good programmers and reap the rewards of being the person, or the team leader who builds the product that generates the revenue.

Comment: Re:A non-UNIX OS in a UNIX world? (Score 3, Interesting) 545

by terjeber (#47924789) Attached to: What To Expect With Windows 9

I find it funny that MS is now the only major OS vendor that isn't running on a UNIX base. Seems like an uphill struggle as the world passes them by.

This is one of those religious things I find quite funny. For the record, I have used Linux since 0.97 and Slackware. I grew up on SunOS and thought that Sun moving the System V with Solaris was a tragedy. I even once ran a home-written BBS (you wouldn't know) on a dual-floppy x86 machine running Minix. I know Unix. Standard Unix Operating system architecture is an archaic, abhorrent monstrosity that we should have left behind computer-eons ago. The Linux OS architecture is bad at its core level, and it isn't really fixable. The Windows NT core is a much better architecture, but Microsoft has made some serious mistakes on the user end.

Oh, and let's not forget X. It was a reasonable idea back when we had big-ass servers running X clients talking to "cheap" X terminals with X servers on them (yeah, X terminology is kinda backwards). I theory. In practice it became a pig. A monster pig. Sure, you can smear any kind of lipstick on the X pig, whether that lipstick is called KDE or GNOME, but it is still just a monster pig smeared with (what is now monster) lipstick. Leave it to the OS community to take what amounts to lipstick and make it a huge unwieldy monster in it self!

If you want to see Unix-like operating systems with a decent architecture, look at Minix 3 and QNX. The concept "Unix base" is not a good thing (TM) per se. Quite the opposite. Monolithic monstrosities are never a good thing. Think about it, the entire core of Minix 3 has plenty of room to run inside the L1 cache of your CPU.

Comment: Re:Hell no (Score 1) 363

by terjeber (#47885077) Attached to: Bill Gates Wants To Remake the Way History Is Taught. Should We Let Him?

is barely suitable for writing cheap business documents

Firstly, that's utter bullshit, but if you are talking about Word 2.0, sure. You forget one thing though. The following part of the sentence: "for the vast majority of the population". For the vast majority of the population, including about 99% of the business document producers, even Word 2.0 is still plenty good (missing some cloud integration etc, but you get my point - for writing documents that 99% of the population does.

Microsoft was changing the functionality of the APIs

That was not a problem. The problem with WP was not that it got tripped by Microsoft, the problem with WP for Windows was that it functioned completely different than all other Windows applications. The WP teams insisted on following their own GUI Guidelines rather than following the "standard" GUI functionality. The development team and the architects plus their managers were all incompetent fools. They were so full of them selves that they didn't start changing WP in sensible ways until it was way too late.

None of the problems with WP had anything to do with Microsoft APIs.

The Netscape issue was how the whole trial started

It was a bullsh*t trial, IMnsHO. The basic tenet of the trial was absurd. The fact that Microsoft bundled a browser with their operating system was not anti-competitive in any way. Netscape would have been able to out-compete IE if it was in any way a useful product. Netscape never became half-way decent and even though Firefox started out OK it quickly spiraled into oblivion due to it being crap. It still is. Chrome would have been almost at the market share of IE right now if it hadn't been for the dumb asses clinging to the bloated monster that is FF.

Comment: Re:Hell no (Score 1) 363

by terjeber (#47884985) Attached to: Bill Gates Wants To Remake the Way History Is Taught. Should We Let Him?

somebody created a market, and Microsoft used various techniques to dominate it

Yes. So did Google. IBM. Cisco. In fact, all companies in the world more or less.

and Microsoft used anticompetitive practices

Yes, they bundled software with the OS. Strangely so does every other operating system vendor these days, but...

Comment: Too many environment morons (Score 1) 491

by terjeber (#47870365) Attached to: To Really Cut Emissions, We Need Electric Buses, Not Just Electric Cars

According to the IPCC personal vehicles contribute about 5% if the worlds CO2 emissions. Since most electricity is produced using non-renewable fuel, they pollute somewhere in the same range as gasoline cars. What does this mean? It means that anyone who talks about personal vehicles and any change to their use whatsoever as a solution to climate change is a moron. Most environuts I have met are morons. Please note, before you get your panties in a bunch, I am not a climate change denier, I am just pointing out that anyone talking about cars as a solution to any problem related to climate change is a moron. Even if we all stopped driving tomorrow and decided to bike to work, it would have an entirely insignificant impact on CO2 emissions.

Changing from gasoline cars to electrical cars will have almost zero effect on CO2 emissions when you consider that walking instead of driving will have a theoretical maximum effect of 5%.

The largest CO2 emitters are electricity production, the agricultural sector etc. This is where we need to start. Starting at a place with a maximum 5% effect is simply retarded. Here is a tip to the environuts: Stop yapping about cars, cars do not emit CO2 in any statistically significant manner.

As for buses, it's basically the same, though the total CO2 emissions are even lower. Again, according to the IPCC the entire transport sector accounts for about 15% of the CO2 emissions, so any discussion involving changes to transportation as a means to solve the CO2 emission problem is retarded.

Comment: Re:Hell no (Score 1) 363

by terjeber (#47863351) Attached to: Bill Gates Wants To Remake the Way History Is Taught. Should We Let Him?

Word Perfect and Netscape Navigator.

Seriously?

Word Perfect for Windows was total crap. It didn't lose because of shady Microsoft techniques, it lost because Word 2.0 was centuries ahead of Word Perfect for the vast majority of the population. Word Perfect owned the word processing market but lost it because the development and management teams were utterly incompetent in addition to be so full of them selves that no matter how much market loss they were experience they refused to listen to their customers.

Netscape was ruling the world until IE6, in hindsight a crap browser, but at the time, heads, shoulders and entire torsos above Netscape. At the time. Afterwards Netscape grew into a bloated monster and the world was saved by Google Chrome.

Comment: Re:Hell no (Score 1) 363

by terjeber (#47854403) Attached to: Bill Gates Wants To Remake the Way History Is Taught. Should We Let Him?

We'll never know the full story of the first-rate products we missed out on.

Wow, I love your argument. Since Microsoft were only creating mediocre products magically that prevented their magical hypothetical competition from creating magical hypothetical software of magical unicorn quality. You are clearly fully rational.

Somebody ought to cross ball point pens with coat hangers so that the pens will multiply instead of disappear.

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