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+ - Where are the Linux talents?->

Submitted by Taco Cowboy
Taco Cowboy (5327) writes "IT is changing organizations across the globe, impacting enterprises, governments and the wider public sector. Open source in particular is a driver in innovation, giving organizations a competitive edge and an ability to scale and adapt to changing market demands.

According to the 2014 Linux Jobs Report, demand for Linux expertise continues to grow, with hiring managers across a number of industries citing Linux talents as one of the top recruitment priorities this year

Unsurprisingly, with more government IT transformation projects under way in Asia Pacific, the need to reinvest in government employees' skills is also on the rise. This may be due to legacy systems, often built on proprietary platforms and supported by IT teams with skill sets limited by the technologies they had to maintain

An example of the legacy system is Lotus Notes system, which was adopted by governments throughout southeast Asia over the past 20 years. When the time came for these governments to move to a new and more capable platform, they had to conduct extensive staff retraining for a new tool. Of course, this led to climbing expenditures given the need for new training

With proprietary systems like Lotus Notes, there is a need to keep learning fixed and limited skills to support proprietary, vendor-specific set ups. Open source knowledge (Linux training) is, generally, highly transferable and can be applied to almost any Linux platform

Hiring managers in both governments and enterprises are bolstering Linux talent plans, according to the 2014 Linux Jobs Report. This report is assembled from a survey taken across 1,100 hiring managers and 4,000 professionals within the Linux space

In fact, the demand for Linux expertise is so high that salaries are being driven above industry norms, in turn causing these Linux professionals to identify Linux knowledge as a career-advancing tool

In Singapore, the Singaporean government appears to understand the need for local initiatives and frameworks, as the new fair consideration framework has led to increased competition for local IT talent

"Due to a limited talent pool in the storage, security, cloud or hosted domains, the market is also facing a shortage of technically skilled pre-sales people," said Regional Director of Hays in Singapore and Malaysia, Chris Mead. He explained that service management, cloud architecture and process and quality specialist roles were also in high demand

"We expect the supply shortage of these professionals to continue as businesses are consistently evaluating their IT operations to enable optimal efficiency and a continual improvement of their IT services"

It is thus important that IT professionals find the appropriate training that will prove to be a long term asset to them and their organizations. On the other side of this transformation governments should consider local initiatives to support Linux training programs, thus growing the skill base for Linux and other open source standards."

Link to Original Source

Comment: What do you call a spade? (Score 1) 71

by Taco Cowboy (#48929839) Attached to: Snowden Documents: CSE Tracks Millions of Downloads Daily

What I'm saying is that calling people "sheeples" is inherently anti-democratic

So what do you call them?

By any other name the sheeples are still acting like sheeps

They do not like to think, they do not like to think so much that they let others to do all the thinking for themselves

And when that happens, someone else do come out and does the thinking for them ... that someone is nothing but the authority

So the authority tells the sheeples that what they are doing --- that BLANKET SNOOPING THING is "good for them" because it will "protect them from the baddies", you know, them "terrorists", them "pedophiles", them with "bad intentions"

And the sheeples bought that shit wholesale --- with line and hook and barrel and everything in between

You want your democracy, so be it, but do not tell me that calling a spade a spade is undemocratic

We can call the "Sheeples" a "Rose", or a "Tulip", or even "Alfalfa", but that name change ain't gonna change their character, not even a bit, Sir !

Comment: Yes, we do need hope, but still ... (Score 1) 71

by Taco Cowboy (#48929813) Attached to: Snowden Documents: CSE Tracks Millions of Downloads Daily

Sir,

I do agree with you that we do need hope, but we must *NOT* forget the fact that 'hoping' ain't gonna do us, or anybody else, any good, especially when what is happening now, from top down (well, the governments are *ON THE TOP* of the people, no matter which government, no matter which nation)

Nowadays governments treat their citizens with contemp

They suspect their citizens so much that they actually take steps to ensure that every single thing their own citizen does must be checked, categorized, and actions must be taken on whoever they suspect (for whatever reason)

Hope in itself is no longer sufficient to fight those fascist, my friend

We no longer live in the 1960's, Sir

We no longer live in a world where the government listens to the people

No man. We are living in the world where the governments DEMAND to be respected, or else

That's the reality all of us are living in, no matter if you live in Canada or China or Saudi Arabia or America or Great Britain, it's all the same --- you, a citizen, better be a sheeple, or we will mark you, we will follow you, we will watch your every single move

Comment: Re:Can they do it with corporate code? (Score 1) 183

by s.petry (#48929543) Attached to: Anonymous No More: Your Coding Style Can Give You Away

It's not just these type of environments that are strict. Well established companies have the same practices, because the only way to have controlled growth is to adhere to a set of standards. Sure, standards change over time but not quickly. For posterity, controlled does not imply restricted.

Comment: Re:Who eats doughnuts with the doughnut men? (Score 1) 454

by s.petry (#48929535) Attached to: Police Organization Wants Cop-Spotting Dropped From Waze App

If there were gangs out killing cops, they would not be in need of an application like Waze to do it. The two NYC cops that were killed a couple months ago were not tracked by anything. The killings were by what appears to be a vigilante that wanted to kill "any" cop.

They psychology behind that is a different thread and story, but the point about being "tracked" is valid. Cops drive in marked cars and wear uniforms. Someone actually "hunting" them would not need an application. In fact it would probably be stupid to do so, because of all the data the application tracking (it would limit suspects).

Comment: Re:Who eats doughnuts with the doughnut men? (Score 1) 454

by s.petry (#48929479) Attached to: Police Organization Wants Cop-Spotting Dropped From Waze App

Haha, of course you immediately jump to the false accusation in an attempt to try and salvage your original failed logic. Of course you can't rationally back your original bullshit, so have to resort to additional fallacy arguments to support your original.

For your information: I have had 0 accidents, 0 tickets, and been driving for over 30 years. If I was a "road-rager", I would at least have had something happen in over 3 decades of driving. I'm not the "slow" guy either, because those guys get into at least as many accidents as the speeders (and most studies show that they cause more accidents).

I gave the points where you were wrong. Invalid generalization, therefor your logic is also invalid. There is no way to salvage broken logic, so scrap your opinion and start over.

Comment: I rather be a paranoid than be totally un-prepared (Score 2) 71

by Taco Cowboy (#48929441) Attached to: Snowden Documents: CSE Tracks Millions of Downloads Daily

Dear Sir,

I may have been thinking too much. In fact, you may even say that I am paranoid - but at the stage that we are in today, that the blanket snooping activities into almost everything that we do online and off, we do need to question why the authority's need to do it, rather than accept what they are telling us by default

Yes, they tell us they are 'looking for terrorists' but is that true?

I mean, if they are 'looking for terrorists' the obvious target for those 'terrorists' are those from a particular religion (that peaceful one, to boot)

But is the authority looking into that group only?

Far from that. They are snooping in on ALL OF US, on our email, on our surfing pattern, on the site we go to, on what we download, on our phone conversation, on everything everybody is doing

Then why are they doing it?

Surely the 'looking for terrorists' excuse ain't gonna cut it no more, there gotta be more than what they are telling us

Yes, I am paranoid, I admit it. But you can't blame me from being paranoid

I am from China, a country which is being ruled by some really despicable regime. At the point when I left China the entire society was in turmoil. People were being pulled out on to the street and beaten, sometimes killed, just because they were labeled as 'anti-revolutionary'

I have had that kind of experiences. Most of you do not. I know what the authority is capable of doing, and what they will do to maintain their control over us, the peons

The more I look at what's happening in the so-called "Western countries" the more it resembles that despicable regime that is controlling China

Yes, I am have been 'overthinking', as you put it, but I rather be paranoid and right and be well prepared (as well as knowing what preventive actions to take before the shit hits the fan), than be totally unprepared and suffered the consequences

But it's all up to you guys. What I am telling you is what I, and many millions of older generation of Chinese had gone through --- we do not trust the authority, we do not trust anyone but ourselves

If you guys insist that the authority is to be trusted, that they are doing what they are doing for 'the good of the people', then that's your right to do what ever you want to do

But when the shit hits the fan (which I fervently hope it will never come true) don't blame me for not forewarning you guys

It happened in China, it could happen, and I repeat, it could happen elsewhere, including the Western countries

Comment: Re:Coding vs. literacy (Score 1) 203

by s.petry (#48929427) Attached to: Why Coding Is Not the New Literacy

Understanding how something works does not require in depth knowledge of the "something". I know many people who are very competent with the use of a web browser and never wrote a line of code in their life. They check links in email, write their own rules for sorting mail, etc.. etc...

I did not take your last paragraph as a "c'est la vie", I perceived it as an insult to anyone knot a coder. Re-reading, I still perceive it that way due to your choice of wording. You never wrote a database from scratch, so how can you possibly understand one given your own definition? Or does writing a "Hello World" program count as enough "knowledge" in your mind so that technology a person uses is not a mystery?

For posterity, I get your point but it's written in very pompous language. A person does not have to be a coder to be intelligent, a person needs to be intelligent to be intelligent.

Comment: Actually, it's part and parcel of absolute fascism (Score 5, Interesting) 71

by Taco Cowboy (#48928669) Attached to: Snowden Documents: CSE Tracks Millions of Downloads Daily

You said:

... as terrorists. I have accepted that. Just change the laws to reflect reality now so we don't have this silly mismatch ...

Actually their target is further than that
 
To illustrate what I mean, let's look at what TFA says ...

... Canada's electronic spy agency sifts through millions of videos and documents downloaded online every day by people around the world, as part of a sweeping bid to find extremist plots and suspects ...

Are they truly looking for "extremist plots and suspects"?

No

Then what they are looking for?

They are looking for potential targets that they deem "dangerous". No, not terrorists but those amongst the people who are NOT sheeples!

You see, those fascists (to put them in a milder term will be an injustice, they are fascists afterall) are not afraid of sheeples. In fact, they WANT all the people to become sheeples so that they can get absolute control over them

What the fascists are afraid, very afraid of, is those amongst us who steadfastly REFUSE to become a sheeple, who instead will use our own brain to think, rather than delegate the thinking to "somebody else", ie, the authority

That is what makes those fucking fascists antsy --- they can't have that, but current laws still do not allow them to pull out all the non-sheeples to the street and shoot them

So they do the next best ... to identify the non-sheeples so that, when it comes the day they can pull people out to the street and carry out summary execution, they would know who to shoot

That is ultimately WHAT they are doing today ... identifying us, closely monitoring us, categorizing us, ... and ultimately, know who they need to eliminate, and where to get those 'trouble makers'

+ - Computer chess created in 487 bytes, breaks 32-year-old record->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The record for smallest computer implementation of chess on any platform was held by 1K ZX Chess, which saw a release back in 1983 for the Sinclair ZX81. It uses just 672 bytes of memory, and includes most chess rules as well as a computer component to play against.

The record held by 1K ZX Chess for the past 32 years has just been beaten this week by the demoscene group Red Sector Inc. They have implemented a fully-playable version of chess called BootChess in just 487 bytes."

Link to Original Source

+ - FCC calls blocking of personal Wi-Fi hotspots "disturbing trend"->

Submitted by alphadogg
alphadogg (971356) writes "The FCC on Tuesday warned http://transition.fcc.gov/Dail... that it will no longer tolerate hotels, convention centers or others intentionally interfering with personal Wi-Fi hotspots. This issue grabbed headlines last fall when Marriott International was fined $600K for blocking customer Wi-Fi hotspots, presumably to encourage the guests to pay for pricey Internet access from the hotel."
Link to Original Source

+ - The iPad Is 5 Years Old This Week But You Still Don't Need One

Submitted by HughPickens.com
HughPickens.com (3830033) writes "Will Oremus writes at Future Tense that five years ago Steve Jobs introduced the iPad and insisted that it would do several things better than either a laptop or a smartphone: browse the web, send email, watch videos, enjoy your music collection, play games, read ebooks. By most standards, the iPad has been a success, and the tablet has indeed emerged as a third category of computing device but there's another way of looking at the iPad. According to Oremus, Jobs was right to leave out the productivity features and go big on the simple tactile pleasure of holding the Internet in your hands. But for all its popularity and appeal, the iPad never has quite cleared the bar Jobs set for it, which was to be “far better” at some key tasks than a laptop or a smartphone. The iPad may have been "far better" when it was first released but smartphones have come a long way. The iPhone 6 and 6 Plus and their Android equivalents are now convenient enough for most mobile computing tasks that there’s no need to carry around a tablet as well. That helps explain why iPad sales have plateaued, rather than continuing to ascend to the stratospheric levels of the iPhone. "The iPad remains an impressive machine. But it also remains a luxury item rather than a necessity," concludes Oremus. "Again, by most standards, it is a major success. Just not by the high standards that Jobs himself set for it five years ago.""

Comment: Re:Great link to a 1912 test for 8th graders! (Score 1) 203

by s.petry (#48920701) Attached to: Why Coding Is Not the New Literacy
I was in particular referring to John Taylor Gatto, and I forget the lady who was the original secretary for the original department who wrote a great book on the corruption and nature of the original program. That people believe it accidental that all of these extreme liberals have been running the department since it's advent is remarkable in my opinion.

+ - 'Super-secure' BlackPhone pwned by super-silly txt msg bug->

Submitted by mask.of.sanity
mask.of.sanity (1228908) writes "The maker of BlackPhone – a mobile marketed as offering unusually high levels of security – has patched a critical vulnerability that allows hackers to run malicious code on the handsets. Attackers need little more than a phone number to send a message that can compromise the devices via the Silent Text application.

The impact of the flaw is troubling because BlackPhone attracts what hackers see as high-value victims: those willing to invest AU$765 (£415, $630) in a phone that claims to put security above form and features may well have valuable calls and texts to hide from eavesdroppers."

Link to Original Source

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