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Comment: Stupidity is abundant these days (Score 4, Informative) 88

If I break into your house, and then walk into your main hallway, and then say, "There is a security flaw in your home! From this point in your hallway I can listen to any room, or walk down freely into any room." As you're looking at your front door splintered from the battering ram I hit it with to get in, would you call it a "hack," a flaw or something to be concerned about how your hallway(s) go through your house? No, you'd say, "The hallway is fine, I need a stronger front door. BTW, the Glock I'm holding is loaded."

When I start to read, "SS7 was designed in the 80s," I already know I'm dealing wtih a mental midget. Actually, SS7 begain due to the first ever hackers. Remember 2600? As in, 2600 Hz was the signaling frequency for a landline switch. Throw that tone, and you could make calls (for free if it was a payphone). Hence, telecoms came up with an idea to do out of band signaling, which eventually became SS7. So, saying you can "hack" SS7 is very misleading because all SS7 does is coordinate call set up. That "ringing" you hear as you wait for the far, distant switch to reply that the called line is available, is a "comfort tone," as SS7 does it's work. Besides cutting down on fraud, SS7 keeps circuits available, because if the called number is busy, or unavailable, there's no point in setting up a line between your local switch and the switch at the far end.

In the deepest bowels of a switching office, usually near the back, you'll see SS7 racks. These connect from and between local, long-distance and other switches. It's what you'd call, "Back Office," network, similar to the network used by the telecoms to manage their servers your traffic go across but you'll never touch. Such as 3G data going through PCF after it's left the mobile switch, and before it hits an internet backbone ATM. So in simple terms, you'd have to break in, figure out the network, and then figure out a 2nd break in to get to the SS7, and then you'd be in a very small part of the network.

Honestly, if you're going to be doing that much effort, you're NOT going after SS7. Just hack the 3-letter agencies or other LEO server for court-approved wiretapping that is hanging off the switching network and you're in anything, everything, anywhere.

Comment: Re:Unclear scope. (Score 1) 2

by Timex (#48592671) Attached to: Two-Factor Authentication

This is what's screwy with /.'s habit of pushing Journals to the Masses without specifically being told to do so. My apologies.

To clarify for you and for others, I wanted to set up Google Authenticator on Debian Wheezy. Instructions are pretty simple; I think it took me all of ten minutes to do, from start to finish.

If you're thinking about giving it a shot, the instructions are generic enough to cover many Linux distros. If yours isn't covered, you might be able to figure it out in pretty short order.

User Journal

Journal: Two-Factor Authentication 2

Journal by Timex

Finally got TFA working on my home system. Trying to SSH into the box will require the PIN and the password. This will only present a problem when I'm using an SSH client from my phone.

Does anyone have personal experiences with this sort of thing? (I have professional experience with it, but this is the first time I've done anything like this at home.)

Comment: Re:A joke? (Score 5, Interesting) 647

by Timex (#48483741) Attached to: Debian Forked Over Systemd

Ubuntu also moved to systemd because everyone was moving to systemd. Before that, Ubuntu has their own init system called Upstart, and there was much debate in Debian on whether to use systemd or Upstart.

It's my understanding that there was an attempt to affect the voting by limiting who had the ability to vote, simply because one of the lead developers was a prominent Upstart supporter. One interesting reference is here, though this is not the source I read about the vote manipulation from.

That said, I'm not overly familiar with how Debian elections are carried out. I only know what I came across in the last couple weeks when I was trying to get a grip on why major distributions were going so solidly with systemd, given issues that so many have found in the package. The trick to remember is that systemd is not the only solution to any {real|perceived} issues that sysvinit may have: There's also openrc and Upstart, to name two other alternatives, and they each have different solutions to bring to the table. Part of what made Linux what it is is the ability to choose what you want in your distro, to determine what you think is really "broken" and what the solution should be.

Honestly, I started getting migraines trying to wade through all the political crap. Proponents of systemd started to sound like American politicians (Democrat or Republican, take your pick; they both tell lies and break promises). It's mind-numbing, which I think is the point. I couldn't find a distro without systemd at all (this was a couple weeks ago, before I head of Devuan) so I wiped my Linux (Fedora) box and put FreeBSD on it.

Yeah, I'll have to learn how to deal with 'ports', but I won't have to deal with the nightmare that appears to be systemd.

+ - Policeman cracks woman's iPad to (potentially) save her life-> 1

Submitted by JohnnyComeLately
JohnnyComeLately (725958) writes "Since the NSA was busy, an officer took matters into his own hands and breaks the privacy setting on a lady's iPad to locate her after a reported crash. The story begins, "After a driver's OnStar alert system reportedly gives inaccurate locations for a crash, the local police department's tech geek thinks fast, breaks into the driver's iPad at her home and finds her via an Apple app." OnStar had erroneously given information which led police to the lady's house. So the officer guessed her passcode, correctly on 3rd try, and unlocked her iPad. Armed with FindMyiPhone app location, police were dispatched more accurately to her location, as the previous information (from cell phone provider) only gave them a 7 mile radius to search. A U.S. Coast Guard helicopter airlifted Vasquez to Regional Medical Center of San Jose."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:/. users? Your sockpuppets? (Score 1) 39

by Timex (#48019437) Attached to: I'm back.

As I mention in another journal entry, he seems to have a very specific problem with me. It appears at least in part to be connected to "what" I am, as opposed to "who" I am. But that doesn't bother me in the least - it's not like I'm hiding the fact that I'm a transsexual, or that I'm ashamed of it.

I don't understand the fixation on a person's sex, whether it's male, female, or somewhere in between. It's not like this goon has to deal with you in Real Life. Consider ignoring him: don't mention him, don't refer to him directly. He's not worth your time. He's only trying to egg you on, to show everyone that you are what he thinks you are. Don't stoop to his level.
 
 

For example, I was telling one of my neighbors today that every time Chapman's Ice Cream goes on sale, I gain weight (the easy part), which I then have to lose (the hard part). So I told her that I have two choices this week - either avoid the sale, or buy an "I'm not fat, I'm pregnant" shirt and not worry about it. I'm going to avoid the sale since I haven't lost all the weight from their last sale this spring, when I bought 20x 2 liter boxes, and I would like to get back down to my ideal BMI before my next doctor's visit.

LOL How did that go over? I should get one of those shirts... Despite having lost 20 pounds over the last six months or so, I still have my belly. :\ That shirt reflects my sense of humor quite well, even if some people I know in real life might not appreciate it. hehe
 
 

And I sympathize with that, because coming to terms with the "what" of who I am meant discarding a lot of stuff, taking risks, not knowing what the outcome would be. But oh wow, am I ever glad I did. It's not fun going around with some sort of internal chip on your shoulder.

That's the thing-- people are, in some fashion, the product of their experiences. They have seen or done things that others have not. They have learned how to react to situations differently than others have. You are not the same person you were yesterday or last year. You're a different person, hopefully all the better for the things you have experienced. :)

Comment: Re:/. users? Your sockpuppets? (Score 1) 39

by Timex (#48016835) Attached to: I'm back.

I have to say... You return and this "apk" whackado seems to have all kinds of time to spend posting (anonymously, I might add) insults on your posts.

If you bother him so much, why does he simply ignore you or something productive like that?

In this JE alone, there are so many posts from him that I am wondering if he even HAS a job to pay for the home he claims to own. :|

Comment: Well... (Score 1) 7

by Timex (#48016787) Attached to: I'm dismayed at how many of the old gang are gone ...

I, for one, am really glad to see you back.

I knew about the blindness becoming a bigger problem, then I slipped and fell off the 'Net for a bit, myself.

I tend toward Facebook for mindless drivel and contacting most of my family. As you may have noticed, I have the occasional post here, largely because the alternative (most of Teh Circle have shifted over to some M$ offering) bites. Those that shifted over there have said something a few years back about someone (SolomnDragon? Her Dave?) working on a more permanent home for Teh Circle, but last I heard that was still in the works.

User Journal

Journal: Undercover police cars 5

Journal by Timex
I was on my way to work today and saw a State Trooper's car on the side of the road. I knew it was a State Trooper not because of the distinctive two-tone blue that cruisers have (this one was black), but because it had several antennas and a radar gun on the driver's side.
User Journal

Journal: H2G2: The saga?

Journal by Timex

I was talking to someone at work about how some of the best political wisdom I've heard came from a Douglas Adams book, specifically the bit about how the ones who aspire to positions of authority are those least qualified to have said positions. The conversation then devolved into how the Beeb had created a site to act as a real-life Guide.

"Hey Ivan, check your six." -- Sidewinder missile jacket patch, showing a Sidewinder driving up the tail of a Russian Su-27

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