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Comment: Re:Google+ (Score 2) 100 100

Aren't friends the whole point of social media?

No. Friends are the point of Facebook specifically, but not social media generally. The point of G+ is to find people who are a source of material that you find interesting. ... Those people may become friends to one degree or another after that, but they start out as strangers.

Comment: Re:Easier to learn != easier to use (Score 1) 382 382

Type erasure, on the other hand, is pure evil - to me, it's the representation of what happens when a pragmatic language ends up into the hands of computer scientists.

Type erasure was the pragmatic way to add generics to Java by ensuring backwards compatibility in the byte code. You'll find that computer language academics almost universally despise type erasure.

Comment: Re:Remember Hypatia (Score 1) 494 494

There are countless more recent examples I could have written about.

So go ahead then, because I think it's really silly whenever a new Muslim atrocity occurs, especially when it comes to women, that some apologist comes along and talks about things Christians did centuries ago.

Encryption

Generate Memorizable Passphrases That Even the NSA Can't Guess 267 267

HughPickens.com writes Micah Lee writes at The Intercept that coming up with a good passphrase by just thinking of one is incredibly hard, and if your adversary really is capable of one trillion guesses per second, you'll probably do a bad job of it. It turns out humans are a species of patterns, and they are incapable of doing anything in a truly random fashion. But there is a method for generating passphrases that are both impossible for even the most powerful attackers to guess, yet very possible for humans to memorize. First, grab a copy of the Diceware word list, which contains 7,776 English words — 37 pages for those of you printing at home. You'll notice that next to each word is a five-digit number, with each digit being between 1 and 6. Now grab some six-sided dice (yes, actual real physical dice), and roll them several times, writing down the numbers that you get. You'll need a total of five dice rolls to come up with each word in your passphrase. Using Diceware, you end up with passphrases that look like "cap liz donna demon self", "bang vivo thread duct knob train", and "brig alert rope welsh foss rang orb". If you want a stronger passphrase you can use more words; if a weaker passphrase is ok for your purpose you can use less words. If you choose two words for your passphrase, there are 60,466,176 different potential passphrases. A five-word passphrase would be cracked in just under six months and a six-word passphrase would take 3,505 years, on average, at a trillion guesses a second.

After you've generated your passphrase, the next step is to commit it to memory.You should write your new passphrase down on a piece of paper and carry it with you for as long as you need. Each time you need to type it, try typing it from memory first, but look at the paper if you need to. Assuming you type it a couple times a day, it shouldn't take more than two or three days before you no longer need the paper, at which point you should destroy it. "Simple, random passphrases, in other words, are just as good at protecting the next whistleblowing spy as they are at securing your laptop," concludes Lee. "It's a shame that we live in a world where ordinary citizens need that level of protection, but as long as we do, the Diceware system makes it possible to get CIA-level protection without going through black ops training."
Privacy

Uber Sued Over Driver Data Breach, Adding To Legal Woes 32 32

wabrandsma writes with news about the latest trouble facing Uber. "Uber Technologies Inc has been hit with a proposed class action lawsuit over a recently disclosed data breach involving the personal information of about 50,000 drivers, the latest in a series of legal woes to hit the Internet car service. The suit, filed Thursday in federal court in San Francisco by Sasha Antman, an Uber driver in Portland, Oregon, says the company did not do enough to prevent the 2014 breach and waited too long — about five months — to disclose it. Antman says Uber violated a California law requiring companies to safeguard employee's personal information."

Comment: Re:Who? (Score 1) 467 467

More specifically for Slashdot, a Republican right-winger who cost the taxpayers of Rhode Island millions when he got a sweetheart loan to move his company, 38 Studios, there, at the urging of the then Republican governor: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04...

Fucking hypocrites.

Comment: Re:git blame (Score 1) 309 309

Most people don't care about encryption but the ones that do, do.

I'm willing to bet if you polled all the people that use email, a significant majority would prefer that their email couldn't be spied on by governments or other snoops. If it was an easy default hardly anybody would turn it off. The problem is that while people care, they don't care enough to make an effort, especially when it requires effort on the people you are communicating with.

"It takes all sorts of in & out-door schooling to get adapted to my kind of fooling" - R. Frost

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