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Comment: Re:This is the long way to say... (Score 1) 127

by bobbied (#49518593) Attached to: New PCIe SSDs Load Games, Apps As Fast As Old SATA Drives

Then this article is worthless because the benchmark is not measuring anything worth measuring.. But Slashdot tends to be that sometimes.

However, I'm not so sure you are correct. The decompression of textures, while CPU intensive, is not that much of an issue for a modern multicore CPU. (Unless the codec being used was poorly implemented or something).

Comment: So, where is the EULA? (Score 2) 525

by bobbied (#49515137) Attached to: Automakers To Gearheads: Stop Repairing Cars

Ok, automakers want to force me to obey their license terms? WHERE ARE THEY?

I've never had a dealer make me sign a EULA or license terms to use the car they just sold me... Go ahead guys, TRY IT!.

Once you do this, I'm going to review all the software I can find in my car and start looking for Open Source libraries in all that fancy user interface stuff you are providing now and make you comply to the license terms for it all. I have a feeling that we will find that you have some legal problems..

Next they are going to try this on hand tools....

Comment: This is the long way to say... (Score 1) 127

by bobbied (#49515031) Attached to: New PCIe SSDs Load Games, Apps As Fast As Old SATA Drives

We've reached the limits of the flash technology which drives both the SATA and PCIe versions of the storage device, at least in terms of how fast the data can be received from the media (the nand flash). This is not surprising. Flash is not all that fast and it quickly becomes the limiting factor on how fast you can read data out of it.

Just moving from SATA to PCIe wasn't going to change the underlying speed of the media. The slowest device in the chain is what rules the overall speed. We've just moved past where the drive interface is the limiting factor.

So the story here really is, that we have reached the limits on the Nand Flash, at least on read performance.

Comment: Re:Glad I use ASUS now (Score 1) 94

by bobbied (#49514799) Attached to: D-Link Apologizes For Router Security

OpenWRT is pretty much brain dead simple with the default load if you have reasonable hardware and use LuCi. Usually the load of the firmware is exactly like what the factory firmware does. Yea, LuCi is a bit more compex than your average home router product, but it's still easy enough that I was able to figure it out with very little help. Armed with the FAQ and or WiKi it's really easy and takes you about 3 steps.. 1. set the root password, 2. configure your internet connection and 3. turn on the wireless connections. Everything else is optional for most.

One issue they could fix is the default configuration. Something a bit more functional out of the first flash might be nice... Just enough to get everything running out of the box, but the failsafe mode is only a few mouse clicks away from an internet connection.

Comment: Re:Glad I use ASUS now (Score 1) 94

by bobbied (#49512381) Attached to: D-Link Apologizes For Router Security
Don't buy hardware unless you can load your own firmware on it. OpenWRT or DDWRT are both great options. Personally, I have two Netgear routers. One that runs OpenWRT that is my internet facing router and it is rock stable as long as my ISP doesn't do something stupid (like they did last week when they changed me from PPPoE to DHCP access w/o telling me in advance). The router my ISP provided would reset multiple times a day (got to love that actiontech junk) and the stock firmware on the Netgear would require a hard boot about once a week. However, OpenWRT has been rock stable for months.

Comment: Re:Good security (Score 1) 94

by bobbied (#49512291) Attached to: D-Link Apologizes For Router Security
The small business stuff isn't that bad actually, once you get past the infant mortality issues in the hardware.. I'd not recommend putting them into a large enterprise network, but for small businesses and home use they are fine. I have 4 of these switches which have been working fine for 10 years now and let me do basic Layer 2 switching, VLAN's and fully functional spanning tree for redundancy. It's a pain to keep the right version of IE laying around so you can manage them, but I just keep an old Windows XP virtual machine for that. Now if you are a large enterprise, don't even think about anything but the full up, enterprise level equipment.

Comment: Re:Good security (Score 1) 94

by bobbied (#49512195) Attached to: D-Link Apologizes For Router Security
I've actually had pretty good luck with the "small business" line born from the Linksys purchase by Cisco. I have 4 of these old Linksys smart switches in my home network and they've run fine for the last 10 years. The problem you will have is that they can only be configured using a version of IE that was last supported on Windows XP so I have to keep a old Virtual Machine with XP on it laying around so I can configure the switches...

Comment: Re:Automated Testing (Score 1) 94

by bobbied (#49512107) Attached to: D-Link Apologizes For Router Security

Automated Testing really only works for making sure things work the way they're supposed to work. There really is no such thing as automated Penetration Testing.

But you can automatically try to find known issues using common attack vectors and avoid shipping the known ones. You can also automatically try randomly generated kinds of potential exploits and see what happens to your software. It's called fuzz testing. And it can expose *possible* exploits, especially if you know something about how your software works. For instance, you can detect that some random packet got passed by the TCP stack and was sent to an application which did something unexpected like logging an exception. You can then take the discovered issue and investigate why the application does what it does and that there isn't an attack vector you can exploit (buffer overflow, SQL injection, or something else).

Comment: Re:Stop bottling it then... (Score 1) 595

by bobbied (#49511043) Attached to: William Shatner Proposes $30 Billion Water Pipeline To California

1.15% actually is a huge percentage for a problem this large.

Well, only if you are not bypassing some OTHER water use that is more easily curbed. Why not start filling in all those private swimming pools in Southern Cali? Can you image how many billions of gallons go into evaporation alone for pools that might be used once a month?

What about watering lawns, leaking toilets, dripping faucets, leaking pipes and kids playing in the hydrants opened in the street? I'm sure ALL of these are orders of magnitude bigger issues than what is "wasted" by bottling it for drinking.

Comment: Re:Lessons from Fukushima (Score 1) 595

by bobbied (#49510955) Attached to: William Shatner Proposes $30 Billion Water Pipeline To California

How about build a desalination plant with use of nuclear power in California?

Did you learn nothing from Fukushima? Don't build nuclear power plants in earthquake zones! Bad idea.

No, actually the earthquake wasn't the problem, the plant survived fairly well with an earthquake that was many orders of magnitude above the designed speciation's. If the emergency power hadn't failed (by being flooded in sea water), the plants wouldn't have been useable and we would have had some leakage of radioactive water but not the mess we have now. What failed was the electrical power at the plant because the giant wave that took out all the backup generators and there was no way to get portable generation on site fast enough to keep the plants from overheating.

Not to mention that these designs where incredibly OLD technology, having not advanced in nearly 20 years. Much safer designs exist, ones that don't have the problems with needing supplemental cooling pumps when there is an unplanned shutdown, where they fail to an inertly safe state in emergencies. They can be built to withstand just about any earthquake short of total local destruction, and even then fail into a inert state. (but an event like that would likely make the nuclear issue look tame anyway) And although you might have to wait a few thousand years before you can totally decommission the plant after something like that, you won't have the issues Japan saw.

When someone says "I want a programming language in which I need only say what I wish done," give him a lollipop.

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