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Comment: Re:hackers and painters (Score 1) 371

by bobbied (#47919089) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Any Place For Liberal Arts Degrees In Tech?
The best two programmers I know both didn't have college degrees at all... But that doesn't mean I would recommend those desiring such a career to forget the technical education a CS degree gives you. Both of the programmers I know expressed to me that they wish they had actually done the college degree because like it or not, not having the degree does put a considerable limitation on where you can work and thus can put limits on your earning power. Go to school, get the degree. Better yet, the masters or Phd...

Comment: Re:In other words....Don't look like a drug traffi (Score 1) 461

by bobbied (#47884533) Attached to: CBC Warns Canadians of "US Law Enforcement Money Extortion Program"

It's happened 65 thousand times according to this article. You can't assume that just because someone can't afford a lawyer that they're guilty.

Seizure of property perhaps. Unjustified seizure of property, not so often. I've only heard of ONE case myself where the seizure was found to be unjustified.

So are you claiming that some people just let the property go when it wasn't a justified seizure? Can you produce examples? I'm sure there are organizations that would be happy to fund the legal bills to get their property back as what you suggest is a violation of the 5th amendment.

Comment: Re:In other words....Don't look like a drug traffi (Score -1, Troll) 461

by bobbied (#47884479) Attached to: CBC Warns Canadians of "US Law Enforcement Money Extortion Program"

and that requires that they actually have some level of proof that illegal activity was going on.

You haven't been following this issue very much, have you? Siezures have been made where there was no proof, only suspicion (based on the flimsiest of evidence). As the owner, you don't have the right to challenge the siezure -- the siezure is made against the property itself.

Oh I understand the issue just fine. But, they have to have a minimum level of proof to do the seizure and they also have to defend the action in court if/when the property owner objects. A judge will rip them a new one if they don't come up with justification and the property owner objects. There are checks and balances here.

Comment: Re:In other words....Don't look like a drug traffi (Score -1, Troll) 461

by bobbied (#47884427) Attached to: CBC Warns Canadians of "US Law Enforcement Money Extortion Program"

Like I said to another poster. This unlawful seizure has only happened in a handful of cases over the last decade, and those where corrected by the courts, property returned and officers involved appropriately disciplined.

The original story reads like this happens every day. Sorry, that's not true. It doesn't happen once a week, or once a month even. For the vanishingly few cases where police forces are actively looking for things to seize, you lower your personal risk by not LOOKING like someone who's stuff they can get their hands on easily. Thus my advice to be careful of appearances.

Look, many TV programs have tried and failed to document this happening since the law was passed. 20/20 came about as close as anybody, but all they really caught on camera was a questionable traffic stop and a whole lot of people who where claiming to be innocent but had serious credibility issues. If the press cannot find and document this, it's NOT happening with any frequency that should be concerning.

If you choose to look like you might be doing something illegal, best figure on being more interesting to those who are charged with preventing crime. So it's up to you. If you want to be stopped and questioned more often, go ahead.

Comment: Re:In other words....Don't look like a drug traffi (Score -1) 461

by bobbied (#47884213) Attached to: CBC Warns Canadians of "US Law Enforcement Money Extortion Program"

So, you believe it is okay for the government to confiscate your property, without being able to articulate a _reasonable_ suspicion of criminal activity, without charging you with a crime, and without convicting you of a crime?

No., I'm saying that doesn't happen. It's only happened a handful of times, EVER, and the courts fixed it.

If it happens to you, hire a lawyer, get your stuff back.

Comment: In other words....Don't look like a drug trafficer (Score -1, Flamebait) 461

by bobbied (#47883873) Attached to: CBC Warns Canadians of "US Law Enforcement Money Extortion Program"

Come on, don't fall for this stuff. It's not like we are a police state (yet).

Be reasonable, don't do things that make you look like you are hauling drugs (Including not actually doing it), and things will be OK. Where I get that a foreign national might have a bit more to worry about, especially one driving a car with foreign plates, but remember, all they can get from you is the car and what you are carrying, and that requires that they actually have some level of proof that illegal activity was going on.

Unless you are incredibility stupid, or actually doing something illegal, you have nothing to fear from 99.999% of law enforcement, and for that 0.001% of the time there is a risk, there isn't much you can do anyway. But you have the same things at home I'll bet.

Comment: Re:ok (Score 3, Insightful) 102

by bobbied (#47882679) Attached to: Top EU Court: Libraries Can Digitize Books Without Publishers' Permission

then the next big thing for European libraries is to allow vpning into the library network and remote viewing the kiosks through a webpage. Sounds fair to me.

They need to allow the creation of satellite locations by their members and then connect all these locations (the member's computer) via VPNs... That way, I can just have my own living room become part of the library and read anything in the collection. Sounds like a win/win to me..

Comment: Re:In other words nobody is born smart (Score 1) 268

by bobbied (#47881931) Attached to: Massive Study Searching For Genes Behind Intelligence Finds Little

The hard part is going to be getting a supply of implantable identical twins.

Not as hard as you might think from a "technology" perspective. Actually fairly easy I would guess. IVF would be the first step, then you just break things into multiple parts before things really get going and implant. I'm not an expert in this area, so I'm only guessing how hard that would be.

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