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Submission + - Microsoft Now Defaulting an Update to Install Windows 10 1

grimmjeeper writes: I've seen all of the enthusiastic pushing of Windows 10 onto users. I've dismissed the prompt to optionally "upgrade" to Windows 10 on my laptop because I don't want it. But the latest upgrade cycle had something new. Under "optional" updates, there was the "Update to Windows 10" entry among the few other updates. But here's where things changed. The option box was checked by default. I have never once seen an "optional" update checked by default. Had I not bothered to go through the list of updates, as most people don't, I would have had Windows 10 pushed on me without my consent.

But it doesn't stop there. I unchecked the option and right clicked it to "hide this update" and proceeded to install other updates. When it rebooted I discovered that there was another update that needed to process. But there was an "optional update" pending as well. Lo and behold, the "Upgrade to Windows 10" option was there again and it was checked by default after I went out of my way to disable this option!

This is a new low for Microsoft. The prompts for reserving my copy were annoying enough but eventually they went away. But in this case, I have made a positive effort to tell Windows Update that I do not want to install Windows 10. And Microsoft has not only deliberately ignored my preference, they did so in a way that deliberately tried to obfuscate the choice being made for me. This is out-and-out deceit. This is entirely unacceptable.

Has anyone else seen this? Is there anything else that can be done to prevent this "option" from showing up every time? Or at least, is there a way to default it to being unchecked? I mean, besides wiping out Windows and replacing it with Linux? Which is an option I'm considering.

Submission + - Study: Refactoring Doesn't Improve Code Quality (itworld.com)

itwbennett writes: A team of researchers in Sri Lanka set out to test whether common refactoring techniques resulted in measurable improvements in software quality, both externally (e.g., Is the code more maintainable?) and internally (e.g., Number of lines of code). Here's the tl;dr version of their findings: Refactoring doesn’t make code easier to analyze or change; it doesn't make code run faster; and it doesn't doesn’t result in lower resource utilization. But it may make code more maintainable.

Submission + - Measuring the value of open hardware designs (opensource.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: Industry knows open source software has an immense value, but how valuable is an open hardware design? To answer that question, Dr. Joshua Pearce, an associate professor at Michigan Tech University analyzed three methods to quantify the value of open hardware design in the latest issue of the journal Modern Economy.

Submission + - Video Editor Kdenlive 0.9.6 Released (kdenlive.org)

jrepin writes: Version 0.9.6 of free and open source video editor Kdenlive has been announced. This version adds a Reverse clip option to Clip Jobs that creates a backwards clip.The list of audio/video bitrates can now be customized in custom rendering profiles. New release also fixes several bugs and crashes, including a very annoying bug that caused project files to seem corrupted.

IDEs With VIM Text Editing Capability? 193

An anonymous reader writes "I am currently looking to move from text editing with vim to a full fledged IDE with gdb integration, integrated command line, etc. Extending VIM with these capabilities is a mortal sin, so I am looking for a linux based GUI IDE. I do not want to give up the efficient text editing capabilities of VIM though. How do I have my cake and eat it too?"

The brain is a wonderful organ; it starts working the moment you get up in the morning, and does not stop until you get to work.