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Submission + - Fast Open Source CPU/GPU Implementation of CTC from Baidu Research (baidu.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Baidu Research's Silicon Valley AI Lab released open source software for the machine learning community. Warp-CTC is an implementation of the #CTC algorithm for #CPUs and NVIDIA #GPUs. Warp-CTC is 10-400x faster than current implementations. It makes end-to-end deep learning easier and faster so researchers can make progress more rapidly.

Submission + - Hackers get Linux running on a PlayStation 4 (engadget.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Two years after the PlayStation 4 was released, and two weeks after it was jailbroken, a group of hackers has now successfully installed Linux on it. "...it appears that the fail0verflow team utilized a WebKit bug similar to the one recently documented by GitHub user CTurt and then took things up a notch. CTurt's workaround focuses on the PlayStation 4's Webkit browser, which is tricked into freeing processes from the core of the console's operating system by an improvised webpage. The PS4 is powered by Sony's Orbis OS, which is based on a Unix-like software called FreeBSD. With a route into the console's system, fail0verflow then identified weaknesses in the PlayStation 4's GPU. It specifically called out engineers from semiconductor company Marvell, accusing them of "smoking some real good stuff" when they designed the PlayStation 4's southbridge chip."

Submission + - Book torrent released before its release date: Linux C Programming 1

internet-redstar writes: Before its release date, the book "Linux C Programming" is available for download in its DRM-free format through bittorrent.
Author, Jasper Nuyens, a Linux veteran was asked about his feelings. "Well, this is a strange situation", he replied, "like the movie from Quentin Tarantino, it is occurring more and more that works are distributed online even before they are available for purchase through the normal sales channels".

The author, however indicated that he isn't that sad with this event. "I don't make my living from selling books. If more people attend our courses based upon the books, than that's great, if more learn to program in C on Linux, that's great too." Mr. Tarantino might not share his feelings, but in the music industry too, some artists shift away their focus from selling CDs to selling tickets for their performances.

"Maybe a similar model is possible for book distribution", Mr Nuyens continued. He added that he will not be taking steps against further distribution of his book. "The sharing through BitTorrent of the book actually helps its distribution, so I don't see it as a bad thing at all."

Here is the magnet link:
magnet:?xt=urn:btih:5F77AF83F92ADB7E7A96C753A260531FC9B1ED9B&dn=Linux_C_Programming_version_12-2015.pdf&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.openbittorrent.com%3a80%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.publicbt.com%3a80%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.istole.it%3a80%2fannounce

Submission + - Red Star: North Korea's operating system revelaed (theguardian.com)

rippeltippel writes: Linux-based and with a stylish OSX-like interface, it tackles illegal file exchanges by watermarking your data and reboots itself when you try to tamper with the OS.

From the article:
"If a user makes any changes to core functions, like trying to disable its antivirus checker or firewall, the computer will display an error message or reboot itself. [...] Illegal media is usually passed person-to-person in North Korea using USB sticks and microSD cards, making it hard for the government to track where they come from. Red Star tackles this by tagging, or watermarking, every document or media file on a computer or on any USB stick connected to it"

Submission + - Poverty stunts IQ in the US but not in other developed countries | Ars Technica (arstechnica.com)

An anonymous reader writes: New research published in the journal Psychological Science (abstract) found that children who grow up in poverty within the United States tend to have lower IQs than peers from other socioeconomic brackets. Previous studies have shown a complex relationship between a child's genetics, his environment, and his IQ. Your genes can't pinpoint your IQ, but they can indicate a rough range of values within which your IQ is quite likely to fall. For kids in poverty, they consistently seem to end up on the low end of that window. Interestingly, this effect was not seen for any of the other countries hosting kids within the study, which included Australia, Germany, England, Sweden, and the Netherlands. The study authors speculate that "inequalities in educational and medical access in the U.S." may be the root of the differences, though another researcher is planning to study the effect of school environments as well.

Submission + - CERN's LHC might have discovered a new particle (web.cern.ch)

An anonymous reader writes: Two teams of physicists working with the Large Hadron Collider
at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, or CERN, in Switzerland have
reported independently that they have recorded hints of what may be a
particle never observed before.

Submission + - Street Fighter V announced for Linux and SteamOS

An anonymous reader writes: Capcom has announced that their upcoming Street Fighter V game, one of the most anticipated games for 2016, will also be available for SteamOS and Linux. Already in place is support functionality for the Steam Controller, Valve's game controller that was recently updated with some new features. Ever since Valve launched Steam for Linux, the number of native Linux games has positively exploded. But will it be enough for gamers to choose a Linux distribution as their gaming platform?

Submission + - Seymour Cray and the Development of Supercomputers (linuxvoice.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Linux Voice has a nice retrospective of the development of the Cray supercomputer. Quoting: "Firstly, within the CPU, there were multiple functional units (execution units forming discrete parts of the CPU) which could operate in parallel; so it could begin the next instruction while still computing the current one, as long as the current one wasn’t required by the next. It also had an instruction cache of sorts to reduce the time the CPU spent waiting for the next instruction fetch result. Secondly, the CPU itself contained 10 parallel functional units (parallel processors, or PPs), so it could operate on ten different instructions simultaneously. This was unique for the time." They also discuss modern efforts to emulate the old Crays: "...what Chris wanted was real Cray-1 software: specifically, COS. Turns out, no one has it. He managed to track down a couple of disk packs (vast 10lb ones), but then had to get something to read them in the end he used an impressive home-brew robot solution to map the information, but that still left deciphering it. A Norwegian coder, Yngve Ådlandsvik, managed to play with the data set enough to figure out the data format and other bits and pieces, and wrote a data recovery script."

Submission + - GNU Hurd 0.7 and GNU Mach 1.6 Released

jones_supa writes: Halloween brought us GNU Hurd 0.7, GNU Mach 1.6, and GNU MIG 1.6. The new Hurd comes with filesystem driver improvements, provides a new rpcscan utility, and the Hurd code has been ported to work with newer versions of GCC and GNU C Library. The Mach microkernel has updates for compiler compatibility, improvements to the lock debugging infrastructure, the kernel now lets non-privileged users write to a small amount of memory, timestamps are now kept relative to boot time, and there are various bugfixes. MIG 1.6 is a small update which improves compatibility with newer dialects of C programming language. Specific details on all of the updates can be found in the full release announcement.

Submission + - GNU Hurd 0.7 and GNU Mach 1.6 Released (gnu.org)

jrepin writes: The GNU Hurd is the GNU project's replacement for the Unix kernel. It is a collection of servers that run on the Mach microkernel. GNU Hurd 0.7 improves the node cache for the EXT2 file-system code (ext2fs), improves the native fakeroot tool, provides a new rpcscan utility, fixes a long-standing synchronization issue with the file-system translators and other components, and the Hurd code has been ported to work with newer GCC versions and libc. The GNU March 1.6 microkernel also has updates for compiler compatibility, improvements to the lock debugging infrastructure, the kernel now lets non-privileged users write to a small amount of memory, timestamps are now kept relative to boot time, and there are various bug-fixes.

Submission + - A road trip into the Free Software Foundation's early days (opensource.com)

An anonymous reader writes: In an article on Opensource.com,Jonas Öberg, executive director of the Free Software Foundation Europe, recounts a road trip to the 1999 Bazaar in New York City with Richard Stallman:

Now, as interesting as it was to be at MIT, it wasn't the main reason for my trip. In November 1999, Tim Ney, then executive director of the FSF, asked me if I was going to be at The Bazaar in December. The FSF was going to hand out the 1999 Free Software Award, and going to the ceremony was something I had wanted to do for a long time. So, I made the trip, first stopping in Boston.

Read more on Opensource.com.

Submission + - ARM64 vs ARM32 -- What's different for Linux programmers? (edn.com)

DebugN writes: When ARM introduced 64-bit support to its architecture, it aimed for Linux application compatibility with prior 32-bit software on its architecture. But for Linux programmers, there remain some significant differences that can affect code behaviour. If you are a Linux programmer working with — or will soon be working with — 64-bit, you might want to know what those differences are, and this useful EDN article says it all.

Submission + - Debian dropping Linux Standard Base (lwn.net)

basscomm writes: For years (as seen on Slashdot) the Linux Standard Base has been developed as an attempt to reduce the differences between Linux distributions in an effort significant effort. However, Debian Linux has announced that they are dropping support for the Linux Standard Base due to a lack of interest.

If [Raboud's] initial comments about lack of interest in LSB were not evidence enough, a full three months then went by with no one offering any support for maintaining the LSB-compliance packages and two terse votes in favor of dropping them. Consequently, on September 17, Raboud announced that he had gutted the src:lsb package (leaving just lsb-base and lsb-release as described) and uploaded it to the "unstable" archive. That minimalist set of tools will allow an interested user to start up the next Debian release and query whether or not it is LSB-compliant—and the answer will be "no."


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