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Comment Re:Apple would reject 100% CPU app (Score 1) 377

I thought 100% CPU loops in a background application were exactly what the App Store review process was designed to prevent.

Unfortunately, first-party code doesn't go through that same process. I was thinking in particular about a recent experience with spotlight indexing when I made that snarky comment.

Comment Re:Real bad news (Score 1) 377

This. "I would buy an iPhone if it were only thinner," said no one ever.

What would make me upgrade my iPhone 6S to the iPhone 7 rather than skipping two generations and buying the iPhone 8? Give me the ability to carry my phone for a two week trip, using it the way I do now, without having to charge it.

By contrast, there's something bordering on pure insanity about the notion of taking away the headphone jack that many of us use very heavily in our cars while charging the device just so that Apple's engineers can brag about how much thinner they made a device that's already too thin to hold up to your ear without being constantly in fear of dropping it unless you put it in a case. Doubly so when you realize that it will likely mean relying more and more on software tricks to keep the battery life numbers up, while the worst-case battery life (with one of those hundred minor background daemons sitting in a tight loop using 100% of one CPU) continues to decline.

Comment Re: Airplane Mode (Score 1) 377

In the U.S., portable devices like cell phones can be used in airplane mode during takeoff and landing. Wireless headsets, however, are not allowed. So this would mean that if you plan to fly, you'll have to carry your wired headphones and an adapter. Just another reason that removing the headphone jack is an idiotic idea.

Comment Re:Oh, really? (Score 1) 225

Samsung has sold hundreds of millions of phones with OLED screens in.

Samsung manufactures OLED screens. They don't have to worry about a supplier not being able to meet demand, because they are the supplier. If they have to throw more money at it to bump up production, they will. If the yield is too low, they can make up for it by cranking up the price of OLEDs disproportionately for everyone else that they supply panels to, or by cutting off those other companies entirely.

A company buying panels from somebody else doesn't have that flexibility.

Comment Re: Easy solution (Score 1) 480

Eventually, those bearings fail, and you have to replace the motor, but not for a very long time.

I certainly hope not. You can typically press new bearings in for just about all other motors, after all.

You can put new bands in a transmission, too. Still, probably 99% of the time, you get a rebuilt transmission installed, and the installer ships back the old part to be remanufactured. I would expect that to be true for electric motor repairs as well.

You missed suspension, steering, body work/subframe rot, electical issues, HVAC issues, LED lights (yeah, they do go bad, apparently rather often from what I've seen on the road), tires, snow tires and wheels, parking brake adjustment, brake fluid, bearing replacement, differential work (though that could be eliminated), axle issues, interior problems (broken seats, for example), interior lights, batteries, and probably other stuff I've forgotten.

Brakes and steering on most electric vehicles are electrical, not hydraulic, which should result in very low maintenance, at least within the currently typical lifespan of a car.

Besides, most of the things on that list are repairs (after failures), not routine maintenance (to prevent future failures). There's nothing you can do maintenance-wise to prevent a blown interior bulb or a broken seat (except perhaps losing weight if you're on the heavy side).

The only thing on your list that I would consider true maintenance is tires, which was one of the things I mentioned.

Comment Re: Easy solution (Score 4, Informative) 480

And yes owners, there is oil needed for your volt.

Um, no. Electric cars use permanently lubricated bearings. There's no mechanism by which the dealer can add oil to anything. Eventually, those bearings fail, and you have to replace the motor, but not for a very long time.

Electric cars do need tire rotation, brake pad replacement, and replacement of brake lights and other exterior lights (if they aren't LEDs). Beyond that, they should be largely maintenance-free.

Comment Re:Let them lease, but not screw with sales (Score 1) 245

The PC is a modular product made to be upgraded. If they don't want you tampering with stuff inside of it, they need to put a tamper seal on each thing they don't want you touching.

Well, they certainly can do so, but AFAIK, there's no legal reason they have to do so. However, if they deny the warranty, the burden of proof is on them to show that the changes you made caused the failure, at least in theory. In practice, if you aren't willing to sue them, they can deny the warranty all they want to, and they probably won't ever get in trouble for it.

Comment Re:Questions... (Score 1) 137

It's not greed, just survival. For some unknown reason antibiotics have a synergistic growth effect on animals that are not sick so antibiotics are feed to healthy animals. In the real world most businesses are barely profitable so any action that can increase profits is used to avoid bankruptcy.

Horses**t. The first farmers who did this did it because of greed, trying to make a bigger profit. Later farmers might have felt that it was the only way to survive, but only because the first farmers did what they did.

If your business isn't making a profit, you raise prices until it does. If you can't do that, it means either that you're doing something inefficiently or that somebody else is cutting corners. If it is the former, you need to fix the inefficiency. If it is the latter, you need to clearly differentiate your products from those others in the marketplace so that your customers know why your products cost more. Either way, cutting the same corners that everybody else does invariably results in a race to the bottom, not just in terms of cost, but also in terms of profit margins and quality. Once your business goes down that path, you might as well close the business and give the money back to the shareholders, because it is a hopeless cause, and your business is no longer contributing anything of value to the world as a whole that could not be contributed just as easily (and more efficiently) by your competitors in your absence.

Comment Re:Small print (Score 1) 33

Yes, this isn't all that unusual at all. It's pretty consistent with the unsolicited ideas submission policies of most major companies.

With that said, if these terms scare you, and if you don't care about submitting to Amazon, but just want a web-based script writing platform, check out WebScripted TV. It's kind of preliminary (translation: I'm the only developer, only user, and only tester), and I had to work around dozens of really bad bugs and misbehavior in various browsers' HTML editing functionality (to such an extent that MSIE isn't even supported, because it was just too broken to be even halfway functional last time I tried), so don't expect God's greatest gift to his people, but it is free to use, and lets you save copies of your content locally for backup purposes (or at least I think I enabled that feature).

And if you're an aspiring director, camera operator, etc., it offers the potential for creating groups of reviewers who can accept submissions from outside writers, collaboration on an online forum, peer editing, etc. Of course, I don't have the connections needed to actually get folks to start using it, but the potential is there.

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