Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive


Forgot your password?
Slashdot Deals: Cyber Monday Sale Extended! Courses ranging from coding to project management - all eLearning deals 20% off with coupon code "CYBERMONDAY20". ×

Submission + - User reports searing-hot iPad, melted cord ( 3

J. Dzhugashvili writes: A member of the Tech Report forums reports that his iPad's charging cord literally melted in the middle of the night, and the iPad it was connected to became searing hot—hot enough that the user dropped it and caused some damage. Melted charger cables and searing-hot (or combusting) batteries are nothing new, and they've led to mass battery recalls in the past. After getting in touch with Apple, however, the user was simply told he was responsible for damaging the device by dropping it, and that the iPad was out of warranty for having jailbroken software installed.

Submission + - The Wi-Fi on the Bus

theodp writes: For students who endure hundreds of hours on a school bus each year in a desert exurb of Tucson, the Wi-Fi on the bus goes round-and-round, all through the town. Last fall, school officials mounted a $200 mobile Internet router from Autonet Mobile to bus No. 92's sheet-metal frame, enabling students to surf the Web. What began as a hi-tech experiment has had an unexpected result — Wi-Fi has transformed the formerly boisterous bus rides into a rolling study hall, and behavioral problems have virtually disappeared. 'Boys aren't hitting each other, girls are busy, and there's not so much jumping around,' said J. J. Johnson, the Internet Bus driver.

Submission + - Oracle Charging For Solaris Patches, Info ( 1

bhtooefr writes: "It looks like Oracle's already making changes for the worse at Sun. Dennis Clarke posted on OpenSolaris's discussion list, claiming that Oracle is planning on requiring a support contract for any patches for Solaris, including security patches. Oracle has silently posted a document that appears to state that change in policy regarding patches. (Previously, non-security patches could be manually downloaded for free without a support contract, and security patches could be automatically updated for free.) In addition, Clarke claims that access to SunSolve, which contains documentation on Solaris patches and Sun hardware, will soon be restricted to those with an active support contract."

If it's worth hacking on well, it's worth hacking on for money.