Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter


Forgot your password?
Slashdot Deals: Cyber Monday Sale Extended! Courses ranging from coding to project management - all eLearning deals 20% off with coupon code "CYBERMONDAY20". ×

Comment Re:Nothing New - not very smart (Score 1) 223

> The concept of the Sharing economy is stupid at its core.
You're begging the question.

Co-operation is not stupid; it is an _optimization._ Pooling resources so that those in need have access that they might not normally have. But I guess you would rather be a selfish asshole. You're part of the problem, not the solution.

> Every sharing economy is based upon an outside requirement
Nonsense. Counter proof: The Amish.

Just because most men are to stupid to value the spiritual truth of "You receive what you give", and "Treat others how you want to be treated" in spite of man's obsessive path of destruction, this in no way negates man's potential to live a harmonious and in unity with all things.

At some point war will seem as archaic as slavery, along with money. The whole definition of wealth is based upon a false premise: There is never enough.

~2022: The greatest discovery: We are not alone
~2024: The greatest tragedy: World War 3

Comment Re:Moving jobs is often the only way to get a payr (Score 1) 223

The same holds true in the game dev industry too. Switching jobs roughly about every ~2 years is the most effective way to get a pay raise.

If companies want to stop complaining about lack of "retention" then they need to realize they are part of the problem with people gaming the system.

Comment Re: At what point do we reevaluate the position (Score 1) 223

> What has socialism done to give it such a horrible name?

Robbing from Paul to pay Peter.

The problem in America is that there is a _perception_ of socialism == communism which is anathema to (free market) capitalism.

Ironically the US _is_ communist; it is just never _labeled_ as such, but the facts, sadly, speak for themselves:

1. Abolition of private property in land and application of all rents of land to public purpose.
2. A heavy progressive or graduated income tax.
3. Abolition of all rights of inheritance.
4. Confiscation of the property of all emigrants and rebels.
5. Centralization of credit in the hands of the state, by means of a national bank with state capital and an exclusive monopoly.
6. Centralization of the means of communication and transportation in the hands of the state.
7. Extension of factories and instruments of production owned by the state; the bringing into cultivation of waste lands, and the improvement of the soil generally in accordance with a common plan.
8. Equal obligation of all to work. Establishment of Industrial armies, especially for agriculture.
9. Combination of agriculture with manufacturing industries; gradual abolition of the distinction between town and country by a more equable distribution of the population over the country.
10. Free education for all children in government schools. Abolition of children's factory labor in its present form. Combination of education with industrial production, etc. etc.

For more details see:
* http://laissez-fairerepublic.c...

Comment Re:Punishing people who get degrees we need the mo (Score 1) 219

I'd like to see the people with the most money who also claim that there is a "shortage" to offer to pay the tuition for X number of STEM classes so that students could take them for FREE.

Even if they only start with the 100 level math courses.

Would more people end up taking Calc 3? Maybe. Maybe not. If they do, good. If they do not, then the cost won't be a problem.

Switch the focus from getting-money-from-students to getting-more-STEM-students.

Comment Re:Book misses major points (Score 0) 154

I don't think she sufficiently covered the HOW which is the problem.

They don't fund a charter school and see how the students there do.

They fund political campaigns to move money FROM the existing system TO their system.

When their system does not support their projections, they leave it. BUT THEY DO NOT PAY TO HAVE THE LAW REVERSED.

So the end result is a worse public school system.

Submission + - Is there a bookmark manager that actually manages bookmarks? 1

hackwrench writes: Most reviews of so-called bookmark managers focus on the fact that they can share bookmarks across browsers and devices and whether or not they can make your bookmarks public or not. Sometimes they mention that you can annotate bookmarks.

Little is said about real management features like making certain bookmarks exclusive to one or a set of browsers or devices, checking for dead links and maybe even looking them up on

I'm sure this isn't an exhaustive list of features that would be good to have. What bookmarks managers do you use and why, and what features would you like to see in a bookmark manager?

Comment Re: he should know better (Score 1) 316

The First Amendment to the ...


It is sad and sickening to see so called liberals ...

Also correct.

BUT ... it does not matter. In the end it is up to the business whether it will run X or not.

By way of example: if I paid you $10 to put a sign on your lawn saying X would it be wrong for you to refuse to put a sign saying Y on your lawn for $10?

And that's where we are at with this. The theatres refuse all religious / political ads. That way they do not endorse X or Y. Nor can they be seen as supporting Y.

Submission + - Why CIA is smearing Edward Snowden after Paris attacks (

JoeyRox writes: "Decent people see tragedy and barbarism when viewing a terrorism attack. American politicians and intelligence officials see something else: opportunity. Bodies were still lying in the streets of Paris when CIA operatives began exploiting the resulting fear and anger to advance long-standing political agendas. They and their congressional allies instantly attempted to heap blame for the atrocity not on Islamic State but on several preexisting adversaries: Internet encryption, Silicon Valley's privacy policies and Edward Snowden."

Submission + - Japanese company makes low calorie noodles out of wood

AmiMoJo writes: Omikenshi Co, an Osaka based cloth manufacturer best known for rayon, a fibre made from tree pulp, is expanding into the health food business. Using a similar process, Omikenshi is turning the indigestible cellulose into a pulp that’s mixed with konjac, a yam-like plant grown in Japan. The resulting fibre-rich flour, which the company calls “cell-eat,” contains no gluten, no fat and almost no carbohydrate. It has just 60 calories a kilogram, compared with 3,680 for wheat.

Submission + - Free Pascal Compiler 3.0.0 is out, adds support for 16 bit MS-DOS and 64 bit iOS ( 1

Halo1 writes: Twenty-three years ago, development started on the first version of the Turbo Pascal and later also Delphi-compatible Free Pascal Compiler, for OS/2 no less. Two decades and change later, the new Free Pascal Compiler 3.0.0 release still supports OS/2, along with a host of older and newer platforms ranging from MS-DOS on an 8086 to the latest Linux and iOS running on AArch64. On the language front, the new features include support for type helpers, codepage-aware strings and a utility to automatically generate JNI bridges for Pascal code. In the mean time, development on the next versions continues, with support for generic functions, an optional LLVM code generator backend and full support for ISO and Extended Pascal progressing well.

Submission + - Raspberry Pi unveils new $5 mini-computer

An anonymous reader writes: The Raspberry Pi Foundation unveiled the Pi Zero, a new $5 mini-computer, Thursday morning. The board is the smallest Raspberry Pi yet, containing the first-gen Raspberry Pi's BCM2835 chip (safely overclocked to 1GHz) and 512MB RAM. The latest issue of The Magpi will include a free Raspberry Pi Zero and hits U.K. newsstands Thursday. The announcement came just a few days before the highly anticipated C.H.I.P. $9 mini-computer goes on sale to the public.

If you can't learn to do it well, learn to enjoy doing it badly.