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+ - 6,000 Year Old Temple Unearthed in Ukraine

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "A massive archaeological dig of an ancient Ukrainian village first begun in 2009 has yielded a discovery that I sort of hope ends up inspiring a video game: a massive, scary-sounding temple. From the article: "Inside the temple, archaeologists found the remains of eight clay platforms, which may have been used as altars, the finds suggested. A platform on the upper floor contains "numerous burnt bones of lamb, associated with sacrifice," write Burdo and Videiko, of the Institute of Archaeology of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine. The floors and walls of all five rooms on the upper floor were "decorated by red paint, which created [a] ceremonial atmosphere."
Maybe this is what Putin has been after."

+ - The 'Traditional' Database Administrator Is Doomed->

Submitted by Nerval's Lobster
Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes "Traditionally, database administrators (also known as DBAs) have been at the center of the data-management universe: There was always a need to have someone optimize the performance of applications by making sure data was well structured. But with the rise of Hadoop and other Big Data platforms, there’s no longer a premium on structure. In fact, many programmers are choosing to write their applications to Hadoop or other classes of so-called NoSQL databases to specifically eliminate the need to rely on having a DBA. That's not to say the "classic" DBA is going away, as there will always be transaction-processing applications invoking structured data; but even there, the rise of NoSQL alternatives such as Apache Cassandra is changing the way processing is done. Database administrators are going to need to evolve to meet this brave new world — but what else is new?"
Link to Original Source

+ - Aging and Orphan Open Source Projects 1

Submitted by osage
osage (3886749) writes "Several colleagues and I have worked on an open source project for over 20 years under a corporate aegis. Though nothing like Apache, we have a sizable user community and the software is considered one of the de facto standards for what it does. The problem is that we have never been able to attract new, younger programmers, and members of the original set have been forced to find jobs elsewhere or are close to retirement. The corporation has no interest in supporting the software. Thus, in the near future, the project will lose its web site host and be devoid of its developers and maintainers. Our initial attempts to find someone to adopt the software haven't worked. We are looking for suggestions as to what course to pursue. We can't be the only open source project in this position."

Comment: Re:Easy to solve - calibrate them to overestimate (Score 1) 391

by UnknownSoldier (#48200157) Attached to: Speed Cameras In Chicago Earn $50M Less Than Expected

Do you even understand what stopping distance or what reaction time means at all???

Why do you think driver's handbooks mentions Braking Distance along with Reaction Time??

It is important to note that the graph below illustrates the braking distance AFTER YOU HAVE APPLIED YOUR BRAKES. To this must be added a REACTION DISTANCE, which is the distance you travel from seeing the danger to putting your foot on the brake pedal. Since 3/4 second is the average reaction time, a motorist will travel 11 feet for each 10 m.p.h. of speed before hitting the brake. At 50 m.p.h. this distance would be 55 feet!

If you are doing 30 mph, this means you are traveling 30 mph * 5280 ft/mi / 60 mins/hr / 60 secs/min = 44 ft / sec. Let's even give you the benefit of the doubt and say your reaction time is 3/4 seconds -- far quicker then the average reaction of around 1.5 seconds.

* Your reaction distance is: ~0.75 sec to react to the light change * 44 ft / sec = 33 ft ! (Agrees with the estimate of 11 ft / 10 mph)
* Your braking distance is: 40 feet.
* Your total distance to stop is: 74 feet !

Which matches what this graph shows for the total distance to stop for various speeds:

* http://www.drivingtesttips.biz...

This means that if the light turns yellow or red and if you are closer then 74 feet, you'll stop past the white line, well into the intersection.

ERGO, you should RUN the light to get OUT of the intersection.

Who ever told you to never run a yellow or red light was a fucking idiot.

+ - Man walks after nose cells repair spinal cord->

Submitted by tiberus
tiberus (258517) writes "A 40-year-old paralyzed man from Bulgaria can now walk again with the aid of a frame after breakthrough surgery transplanted cells from his nose into his spinal cord, which had been severed in a knife attack.

After undergoing surgery to transplant cells from his nose to his spinal cord, a paralyzed man from Bulgaria is able to walk again. The procedure effectively provided a "bridge" over the injury site so nerve cells — encouraged by the special nose cells — could regrow across the scar tissue."

Link to Original Source

+ - Man sentenced for webcam sex with a "teen" computer avatar->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "A man in Australia is believed to be the first to have been convicted as the result of an undercover sting in which charity workers posed online as a 10-year-old Filipina, using a computer avatar to produce an image of the fictional girl.

Details of other 1000 men who contacted the fictional child were sent to police around the world.

For now, the avatar was animated and the chat conducted by an undercover human operative. How long will it be till we have fully automatic computer programs fishing for sex offenders online?"

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Yeah, Good Luck with That (TM) (Score 1) 153

by UnknownSoldier (#48188005) Attached to: Google Changes 'To Fight Piracy' By Highlighting Legal Sites

Yes, the ridiculous length is indeed a problem.

The "evils" of copyright was debated back in 1841 !!

"The easiest form of parochialism to fall into is to assume that we are smarter than the past generations, that our thinking is necessarily more sophisticated. This may be true in science and technology, but not necessarily so in wisdom."
  -- "Macaulay on Copyright"

http://www.kuro5hin.org/story/...

Comment: Re:Yeah, Good Luck with That (TM) (Score 5, Informative) 153

by UnknownSoldier (#48187569) Attached to: Google Changes 'To Fight Piracy' By Highlighting Legal Sites

Correct. The dirty secret of Copyright is that it was invented by --> Publishers <-- to maintain control by preventing other publishers from making a profit !!

I've posted about this in the past ...

"The history of copyright law starts with early privileges and monopolies granted to printers of books. The British Statute of Anne 1710, full title "An Act for the Encouragement of Learning, by vesting the Copies of Printed Books in the Authors or purchasers of such Copies, during the Times therein mentioned", was the first copyright statute. Initially copyright law only applied to the copying of books."

and

"Pope Alexander VI issued a bull in 1501 against the unlicensed printing of books and in 1559 the Index Expurgatorius, or List of Prohibited Books, was issued for the first time."

and

"The first copyright privilege in England bears date 1518 and was issued to Richard Pynson, King's Printer, the successor to William Caxton. The privilege gives a monopoly for the term of two years. The date is 15 years later than that of the first privilege issued in France. Early copyright privileges were called "monopolies," ...

and

"In England the printers, known as stationers, formed a collective organization, known as the Stationers' Company. In the 16th century the Stationers' Company was given the power to require all lawfully printed books to be entered into its register. Only members of the Stationers' Company could enter books into the register. This meant that the Stationers' Company achieved a dominant position over publishing in 17th century England"

History of Copyright Law

+ - Britain May "Go Medieval" On Terrorists And Charge Them With High Treason ->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The British government have been discussing charging Britons that swear allegiance and fight for ISIS with the crime of high treason under the medieval era Treason Act of 1351. It is estimated that between 500 — 1,500 Britons fought for ISIS. Civil rights activists consider the idea “ludicrous” although it is unclear if they think there is a free speech or conscience issue. Treason was punishable by death until 1998. The last person to be executed for treason by Britain was William Joyce who was hung for his role as the Nazi propagandist "Lord Haw-Haw.""
Link to Original Source

Comment: Yeah, Good Luck with That (TM) (Score 5, Insightful) 153

by UnknownSoldier (#48187041) Attached to: Google Changes 'To Fight Piracy' By Highlighting Legal Sites

When "piracy" became hijacked from meaning the naval context, copying was rampant. In the 80's as kids we couldn't afford all the games so we (illegally) shared them. Hell, I got into computers simply because it was a fun challenge to "krack" software. In the 90's In college/university we used BBS's, FSP (how many know about _that_ protocol!!), FTP with hidden directories containing control characters, IRC with XDCC, binary newsgroup with split .RARs., in 2000's we used Torrents and/or P2P such as Emule, etc. It wasn't until years later did we learn that piracy = lack of respect for the author's distribution. As adults we buy things because we want to support the author(s) to produce more. And if it is crap we vote with our wallet -- and tell others to not buy it.

What is kind of ironic and completely counter-intuitive is that those who pirate tend to spend more but that is a discussion for another day. (Part of the problem is that certain "assets" are not even available to be legally purchased, etc.)

IMHO Piracy begins AND ends with education. Futurama's Bender made fun of this "archaic philosophy" that "Sharing is illegal" by joking "You wouldn't steal X, right? Or would I !" meme along with the popular "You wouldn't download car?" Because most people are able to separate the issue from money vs freedom. i.e. Artists want to share their creations. Consumers want to share those same creations -- that is what culture does -- preserves "popular" art in whatever medium. Unfortunately the context behind those same reason's don't always sync up. You have bands like The Who who don't care about "bootlegging"; other sellout bands like Metallica that only care about the money and could care less if fans help "market" the band.

Kids these day's aren't stupid. They are questing the status quo that: "Why is illegal sharing illegal? Because of arbitrary financial reasons??" id software created the shareware model -- give part of the game away for free, customers can spend money to buy the rest. These days Humble Bundles let people pay what they want. IMHO this is the correct way to do things. Compromise between 2 conflicting ideals. Open Source or Creative Commons is another approach.

Google making it harder to find digital goods is not going to change a dam thing. Google wasn't around when we were kids and piracy was rampant. Removing a search engine will only drive the process back underground when it peaked with The Pirate Bay in the mid 2000's.

Piracy has existed since the beginning of the network. Any technological means to try to remove it is like pissing in the ocean. Yeah good luck with that !

+ - JavaScript and the Netflix User Interface->

Submitted by CowboyRobot
CowboyRobot (671517) writes "Alex Liu is a senior UI engineer at Netflix and part of the core team leading the migration of Netflix.com to Node.js. He has an article at ACM's Queue in which he describes how JavaScript is used at Netflix. "With increasingly more application logic being shifted to the browser, developers have begun to push the boundaries of what JavaScript was originally intended for. Entire desktop applications are now being rebuilt entirely in JavaScript—the Google Docs office suite is one example. Such large applications require creative solutions to manage the complexity of loading the required JavaScript files and their dependencies. The problem can be compounded when introducing multivariate A/B testing, a concept that is at the core of the Netflix DNA. Multivariate testing introduces a number of problems that JavaScript cannot handle using native constructs, one of which is the focus of this article: managing conditional dependencies.""
Link to Original Source

+ - FBI: backdoors in software may need to be mandatory->

Submitted by wabrandsma
wabrandsma (2551008) writes "The New York Times:

The director of the F.B.I., James B. Comey, said on Thursday that the "post-Snowden pendulum" that has driven Apple and Google to offer fully encrypted cellphones had "gone too far." He hinted that as a result, the administration might seek regulations and laws forcing companies to create a way for the government to unlock the photos, emails and contacts stored on the phones.

But Mr. Comey appeared to have few answers for critics who have argued that any portal created for the F.B.I. and the police could be exploited by the National Security Agency, or even Russian and Chinese intelligence agencies or criminals. And his position seemed to put him at odds with a White House advisory committee that recommended against any effort to weaken commercial encryption."

Link to Original Source

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