Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Slashdot videos: Now with more Slashdot!

  • View

  • Discuss

  • Share

We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

×

Comment: Re:Thank you, Tekla Perry! (Score 1) 30

by tepples (#49359327) Attached to: Behind the Scenes At a Quantum Dot Factory

There is no red envelope or similiar notifications button, to see replies at a glance

Click the word "Slashdot" at the top left of each page to go to the home page, and your replies should be just below your username in a box at the top of the right column.

No way to even find old comments that slip off the relatively short comment list

I get a "Load More Comments" button at the bottom.

Comment: Statutory rape (Score 1) 200

by tepples (#49359269) Attached to: NZ Customs Wants Power To Require Passwords

But in the case of rape or murder, well, that will end family ties for a few decades.

For this purpose, would you consider "rape" to include sexual contact between an 18-year-old and a 17-year-old when the 17-year-old has presented fake ID? Or are you in the "save it for marriage to avoid accidental molestation convictions" camp?

Comment: I pledge allegiance to Jehovah God (Score 1) 255

by tepples (#49359229) Attached to: Amazon Requires Non-Compete Agreements.. For Warehouse Workers

How about Pledge of Allegiance — is that a "cohesive contract"

Members of some religious groups handle this by not saying the Pledge at all. They pledge allegiance only to god, or they say a parody pledge referencing a pyrotechnic accident in 1984:

I pledge allegiance to the flag,
Michael Jackson makes me gag.
Pepsi-Cola burned him up,
Now he's selling 7 UP.

Comment: Godwin on Godwin's law (Score 1) 200

by tepples (#49358909) Attached to: NZ Customs Wants Power To Require Passwords

In practice, the meaning of "Godwin's law" has grown from the original "later posts to threads about social topics invite more comparisons to the NSDAP" to "he who makes such a comparison loses the argument". Mike Godwin wrote about being surprised about how this law took root in popular culture: "I wanted folks who glibly compared someone else to Hitler or to Nazis to think a bit harder about the Holocaust."

Comment: Re:Good Luck (Score 4, Insightful) 255

by orasio (#49357197) Attached to: Amazon Requires Non-Compete Agreements.. For Warehouse Workers

In any case, you would need Amazon to actually enforce it.
While they do have more money for legal fees, they would risk a big PR issue if they tried to prevent some guy from working at Walmart after quitting Amazon. Also, the first guy with such a problem wouldn't have a lot of trouble finding someone to help them with legal fees, if only for the publicity.

This is probably just a scare tactic, to discourage people from leaving them, it is unethical, but not really enforceable.

Comment: Re:Good code (Score 3, Interesting) 229

by orasio (#49356481) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Makes Some Code Particularly Good?

For newly written code, things like readability, testability, and maintainability all can come in to whether it is "good" or not

For legacy stuff, Good code is code that works. Who cares how easy it is to read or test as long as it works?

The second one should also include "immutable". If it's hard to understand it will evolve easily to non working, and time spent on improvements can start to creep up very fast.

I have worked in very clever, solid code, but not easy to read. It was then maintained and extended by average, but competent programmers down the road, and turned into a big mess, only because it was so hard to understand.

In my experience, good code is easy to read, above all. That will make it easy to extend it coherently, find bugs and stuff. Also, if it doesn't work OK, it's easy to find out why. The single metric that saves time, money, and improves quality down the road is readability. Eveything else should be suject to that.

And, about the last point in the "article", "efficient", it's nonsense. Premature optimization is the root of all evil. You should _always_ follow the second rule of optimization (see http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?RulesOfOptimization ).

Comment: Re:Not being PHP (Score 1) 229

by orasio (#49356379) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Makes Some Code Particularly Good?

PHP can be good or bad, like any other code. Lately it's getting better.
As an example, do you think this looks bad? Looks pretty good to me.

  https://github.com/symfony/sym...

I have some awful, unreadable examples I could share in Java, PHP, Javascript and even C, but chosen language no longer forces you to write bad code. Maybe Perl, but I haven't seen it lately.

Comment: Crashplan (Score 1) 116

by goombah99 (#49355291) Attached to: Amazon Announces Unlimited Cloud Storage Plans

For DIY offsite backup I use crashplan. Their system lets you use their servers if you choose (for payment) but it also lets you use a remote disk you have over at a freinds house too, or one attached to your computer. I bought their software after using the free version for years. Besides being a nice automated backup system, the killer thing was the ability to backup offsite to a friends house. I do it mutually with them, each keeping the other's USB disk at our respective homes.

What's great about this is that if I do ever need to do a full backup, I don't have to try streaming it back through a soda straw over the web. I just drive the station wagon over, pick up the disk, and bring it home. Station wagons have very high bandwidth.

The disk is encrypted so no worries about peepers or what happens if my freinds computer gets broken into.

The payware version is a one time payment not a monthly fee. What you get for the payware version is more parsimonious differential backups and some other features about controlling backup times.

The software has gotten much better over the years too. Early on my complaint was the java bloated itself out to huge memory sizes over time. But now I don't even notice it is running.

Anytime I need to do a bigger than normal backup, I go get the disk and attach it locally, then take it back. That only happens when there's an unusual event. For example, if I make a major change in the structure of my file system, copy everything to a new disk or do something that touches all the files, then this could, in most backup systems, trigger a level 0 backup. So when that happens it's much easier to get things up to date then with any on-the-net storage system.

Comment: ArrayList and StringBuilder use this (Score 1) 479

by tepples (#49354885) Attached to: No, It's Not Always Quicker To Do Things In Memory

I would realloc the buffer doubling the size each time it overflowed. This allocation strategy is simple, is bounded to 50% worst case overhead, and requires only log N reallocations for a maximum buffer size of N.

It also happens to be the policy used by Java's ArrayList and presumably by its StringBuilder.

The price one pays for pursuing any profession, or calling, is an intimate knowledge of its ugly side. -- James Baldwin

Working...