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Comment: Re:Justice Sotomayor... (Score 1) 353

She doesn't want to admit that "affirmative action" is just racial discrimination by another name, and that in practice it amounts to a modern-day Chinese Exclusion Act.

The Wise-Ass Latina is, herself, a perfect example of why racial preferences are a Bad Thing. She's not fit to be on the bench at all, let alone on the supreme court.

-jcr

Comment: Re:openWRT runs, without wireless (Score 1) 106

by TheRaven64 (#46821465) Attached to: WRT54G Successor Falls Flat On Promises

The last time I bought a dedicated device like this, I got a PC Engines WRAP, which is similar to the boards that Soekris sells. For about £100, I got a 266MHz AMD Geode (x86) CPU, a board that could boot from a CF card, and had 3 wired sockets and 2 miniPCI slots (with an 802.11g card in one), a metal case and a couple of antennae. That was quite a few (actually, almost ten) years ago.

The first search result has a similar kit for £139, which is a bit more, but if you shop around you can probably get it for cheaper. That includes a 500MHz x86 CPU and 256MB of RAM, so it will happily run most stock *NIX distributions, or something firewall-centric like pfSense.

Comment: Re:Intentional sabotage? (Score 1) 148

by TheRaven64 (#46821129) Attached to: Next-Gen Thunderbolt: Twice as Fast, But a Different Connector

That's already double what USB provides over data connections, and you shouldn't be drawing much more than that from a notebook anyhow

No, you shouldn't, but the laptop is probably drawing something on the order of 60-85W and there's no reason why it couldn't get that from a power supply in the display, rather than a separate wall wart...

Comment: Re:Thunderbolt does USB, so no. (Also PCIe and HDM (Score 1) 148

by TheRaven64 (#46821121) Attached to: Next-Gen Thunderbolt: Twice as Fast, But a Different Connector
Thunderbolt doesn't do USB, however the fact that it does PCIe means that you can run a USB controller on the other end. You wouldn't want a Thunderbolt mouse, because it would require sticking a USB controller in the mouse as well as a Thunderbolt interface and a load of PCIe bus logic. USB is nice because the client component is relatively simple and can be made very cheap. It's also nice because there are a number of standard higher-level protocols built on top of it (e.g. HID for keyboards, mice and so on, DUN for things that look a bit like modems). Thunderbolt doesn't replace USB, it's the connection that you use between your laptop and the display or docking station that has all of the USB devices plugged into it.

Comment: Re:Intentional sabotage? (Score 1) 148

by TheRaven64 (#46821105) Attached to: Next-Gen Thunderbolt: Twice as Fast, But a Different Connector
With Thunderbolt, since it can carry two DP signals, you can plug in one cable to drive two monitors. Since it also carries PCIe, you can drive a USB hub and SATA controller and NIC in one display and also connect the keyboard and mouse and an external disk and network at the same time. Having the same connector able to deliver power would mean that you'd be able to drop a phone in a dock and have it gain access to all of those things and charge, which sounds pretty compelling to me.

We're also finding it useful because you can get PCIe enclosures so we can plug FPGA boards directly into laptops, rather than needing to have a desktop sitting under the desk doing nothing except exposing a high-speed JTAG interface, but that's a fairly niche use.

Theory is gray, but the golden tree of life is green. -- Goethe

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