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Censorship

Senators Bash ISP and Push Extensive Net Neutrality 427

Posted by samzenpus
from the there-good-enough-and-smart-enough dept.
eldavojohn writes "Remember when Verizon sued the FCC over net neutrality rules? Well, Senators Maria Cantwell (D-WA) and Al Franken (D-MN) see it a bit differently and have authored a new working bill titled 'Internet Freedom, Broadband Promotion, and Consumer Protection Act of 2011 (PDF).' The bill lays out some stark clarity on what is meant by Net Neutrality by outright banning ISPs from doing many things including '(6) charge[ing] a content, application, or service provider for access to the broadband Internet access service providers' end users based on differing levels of quality of service or prioritized delivery of Internet protocol packets; (7) prioritiz[ing] among or between content, applications, and services, or among or between different types of content, applications, and services unless the end user requests to have such prioritization... (9) refus[ing] to interconnect on just and reasonable terms and conditions.' And that doesn't count for packets sent over just the internet connections but also wireless, radio, cell phone or pigeon carrier. Franken has constantly reiterated that this is the free speech issue of our time and Cantwell said, 'If we let telecom oligarchs control access to the Internet, consumers will lose. The actions that the FCC and Congress take now will set the ground rules for competition on the broadband Internet, impacting innovation, investment, and jobs for years to come. My bill returns the broadband cop back to the beat, and creates the same set of obligations regardless of how consumers get their broadband.'"
Power

Nanotubes May Improve Solar Energy Harvesting 93

Posted by Zonk
from the just-put-in-a-direct-nuclear-tap dept.
eldavojohn writes "Scientists are hoping that the 'coaxial cable' style nanotube they developed will resolve energy issues that come with converting sunlight to energy. The plants currently have us beat in this department but research is discovering new ways to eliminate inefficiencies in transferring photons to energy. Traditional methods involve exciting electrons to the point of jumping to a higher state which leaves 'holes.' Unfortunately, these electrons and holes remain in the same regions and therefore tend to recombine. The new nanotubes hope to route these excited electrons off in the same way a coaxial cable allows a return route for electrons. End result is fewer electrons settling back into their holes once they are elevated out of them yielding a higher return in energy."
Movies

'Kryptonite' Discovered in Serbian Mine 272

Posted by Zonk
from the okay-now-nobody-find-the-red-kryptonite-and-we're-fine dept.
Rubinstien writes "A mineralogist at London's Natural History Museum was contracted to help identify an unknown mineral found in a Serbian mine. While he initially thought the miners had discovered a unique compound, after its crystal structure was analyzed and identified the researcher was shocked to find the material already referenced in literature. Fictional literature. Dr. Chris Stanley, from the BBC article: 'Towards the end of my research I searched the web using the mineral's chemical formula — sodium lithium boron silicate hydroxide — and was amazed to discover that same scientific name, written on a case of rock containing kryptonite stolen by Lex Luthor from a museum in the film Superman Returns ... I'm afraid it's not green and it doesn't glow either — although it will react to ultraviolet light by fluorescing a pinkish-orange.'"
Intel

Intel Opens Its Front-Side Bus 185

Posted by kdawson
from the engineers-rampant-on-a-field-azure dept.
vivin writes "The Inquirer is reporting that Intel has opened up its FSB. Intel did this during IDF 07. What this means is that you can plug non-Intel things into the Intel CPU socket. The article says 'This shows that Intel is willing to take AMD seriously as a competitive threat, and is prepared to act upon it. In addition to this breaking one of the most sacred taboos at Intel, it also hints that engineering now has the upper hand over bureaucracy.'"
Businesses

+ - Skype Stole My Credit

Submitted by
Syphtor
Syphtor writes "Recently found out that after 180 days if I don't use some of my Skype Credit (which I paid for), I lose it. They don't refund it, they keep the money. I've logged my complaints with Skype, and am hopeful of getting it back, but it does raise the question for these kind of 'buy credit' businesses. How long is reasonable for them to keep your credit open? 180 days? I think that's bad, obviously Skype disagrees."
Republicans

+ - Netcraft shows RNC running Ohio election servers

Submitted by goombah99
goombah99 (560566) writes "Netcraft is showing a very hard to explain event happened in the Ohio 2006 election. The Secretary Of states website IP address, which normally is directed to an Ohio based IP address and handles all the election reporting, was transferred on election night to the Smarttech Corp owned servers out of state. According to the American Registry on Internet Numbers Smartech's block of IP address 64.203.96.0 — 64.203.111.255 encompasses the entire range of addresses owned by the Republican National Committee. This includes hosting the recently notorious gbw43.com used in the Whitehouse. Can Slashdotters suggest any good explanations for this seemingly dubious transfer?"
Republicans

+ - 2004 vote count manipulated on GOP servers

Submitted by
hugecabbage
hugecabbage writes "The Free Press published an interesting article stating that not only did the Republicans alter the actual Ohio vote count during the 2004 presidential election, they also controlled how the tallies of those manipulated votes were disseminated over the web, affecting media and public perception of the returns as they occurred. FTA: 'There is more than ample documentation to show that on Election Night 2004, Ohio's "official" Secretary of State website — which gave the world the presidential election results — was redirected from an Ohio government server to a group of servers that contain scores of Republican web sites, including the secret White House e-mail accounts that have emerged in the scandal surrounding Attorney General Alberto Gonzales's firing of eight federal prosecutors.'"
The Almighty Buck

FDA Considers Redefining Chocolate 939

Posted by kdawson
from the this-means-war dept.
shewfig writes "The US Food and Drug Administration is considering redefining 'chocolate' to allow substitution of vegetable oil ($0.70/lb.) for cocoa butter ($2.30/lb.), and whey protein for dry whole milk. There are already standard terms to differentiate these products from chocolate, such as 'chocolatey' and 'chocolate-flavored.' The change was requested by the industry group Chocolate Manufacturers of America. Leading the resistance to this change is high-end chocolate maker Guittard, with significant grass-roots support from the Candyblog. The FDA is taking consumer comments until April 25. Here is the FDA page on the proposed change, which oddly enough does not say what the proposed change is."
Math

Busting the MythBusters' Yawn Experiment 397

Posted by kdawson
from the it's-not-the-company-it's-the-hour dept.
markmcb writes "Most everyone knows and loves the MythBusters, two guys who attempt to set the story straight on things people just take for granted. Well, maybe everyone except Brandon Hansen, who has offered them a taste of their own medicine as he busts the MythBusters' improper use of statistics in their experiment to determine whether yawning is contagious. While the article maintains that the contagion of yawns is still a possibility, Hansen is clearly giving the MythBusters no credit for proving such a claim, 'not with a correlation coefficient of .045835.'"
Space

+ - India's successful commercial satellite launch

Submitted by
An anonymous reader writes "India successfully launched an Italian satellite yesterday. The Indian Space Research Organization's announcement here. A BBC article on the launch here with a video clip here. India's launch vehicle has less overall capacity than the competition; but plans to sweep the low end of the market by offering the lowest cost per launched kilogram for smaller payloads."
Google

Outcry Over Google's Purchase of Doubleclick 242

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the fear-of-change dept.
TheCybernator writes to mention that several activist groups have cried out in protest of the Google buyout of Doubleclick reported in recent news. "'Google's proposed acquisition of DoubleClick will give one company access to more information about the Internet activities of consumers than any other company in the world,' said the complaint lodged with the Federal Trade Commission. 'Moreover, Google will operate with virtually no legal obligation to ensure the privacy, security, and accuracy of the personal data that it collects.' The complaint was filed by the Electronic Privacy Information Center along with the Center for Digital Democracy and the US Public Interest Research Group, all of which are involved in online privacy issues."
Linux Business

IBM Reveals New Virtual Linux Environment 96

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the pave-the-way dept.
jenwren1010 writes to mention that IBM has just announced the new open beta version of their virtual Linux environment that allows users to run x86 Linux programs on POWER processor-based IBM System p servers. "Designed to reduce power, cooling and space by consolidating x86 Linux workloads on System p servers, it will eventually be released as the [rolls-off-the-tongue] 'IBM System p Application Virtual Environment (System p AVE).' With a 31.5% global revenue share during 2006, IBM hopes to build on System p UNIX success and extend firmly into the Linux marketplace. Considering there are almost 2,800 applications that already run natively on Linux on System p servers, the chances are good that it will succeed."
NES (Games)

+ - Worlds Rarest NES Cartridge Almost Sold For 1$

Submitted by Zarjazz
Zarjazz (36278) writes "If both the innocence / ignorance of the seller and the validity of the winning bidder are to be believed, a job lot of 24 NES cartridges for $24 (1$ per game) eventually sold for over $20,000 after it was noticed that one of the cartridges was a special winners edition of 'Nintendo World Championships 1990'

After the death of his son in Iraq, the seller placed the games up for auction hoping "whoever buys the games will enjoy them as much as my son did!". NWC contained special versions of Super Mario Brothers, Rad Racer and Tetris to be played under a fixed time limit. At least 90 of these copies exist in a grey cartridge and were given out to semi-finalists of the 1990 NWC however only 26 of these cartridges exist in "gold" for the winners and are considered to be the rarest and most valuable NES cartridge released. The game can be clear seen lurking in the bottom left corner of the original auction image."

The more cordial the buyer's secretary, the greater the odds that the competition already has the order.

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