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Comment: Re:Speaking as a former yearbook adviser (Score 4, Insightful) 369

Get national recognition for his work

In one sense (although they will ultimately lose to their own bosses) they have done him a huge favor and his work is now a national discussion and is being seen by someone who will snap this kid up. I wish him the best, he's a great talent.

Comment: Re: Apple ][ was a great product (Score 1) 74

by cpt kangarooski (#49745473) Attached to: In 1984, Jobs and Wozniak Talk About Apple's Earliest Days

Though there was a good reason for the original compact Macs to discourage users from opening them up -- there were exposed high voltage monitor electronics in there which could give you a hell of a zap of not properly discharged.

The later all in one Macs of the 90s were better in that regard. Their user suitable parts (motherboard, drives) all were easy to get at, but the monitors and power supplies were fully enclosed.

Comment: Re:If I use an IDE, does it mean I'm a bad program (Score 1) 434

by Just Some Guy (#49737369) Attached to: Choosing the Right IDE

Why do you assume that your IDE has features that Emacs doesn't? It's been in active development for 39 years to be a great, productive programming environment. Do you honestly believe that it's had 4 decades of worldwide contribution and not become reasonably good at helping people write software?

Without exception, everyone I've heard decry Emacs and Vim as "just text editors" has never used them beyond "open file / type / save" and has no idea what they were working with. It's like dismissing Linux because you've only used it as an AWS shell, and you feel sorry for people who won't upgrade to Windows so that they can use a web browser.

Comment: Re:There can be only one. (Score 5, Insightful) 434

by Just Some Guy (#49730405) Attached to: Choosing the Right IDE

Longer answer: IDE? No thanks. At least, I've used Eclipse variants and various Visual Studios, but they map onto how I think about writing and managing software. I want a blank screen with lots of keyboard shortcuts, some basic autocompletion, perfect syntax highlighting, maybe some Git support, etc. I don't want code generation or any refactor-all-the-things functions; I won't be using them.

I used Emacs for years and years, only eventually switching to Sublime Text. ST was beautiful and fast but didn't have nearly the ecosystem of Emacs, plus its non-Freeness started showing when it went many months without an update. Life's too short for a proprietary editor, which is where I spent approximately 60% of my work life. I dependent on it more than any other tool and the prospect of my chosen tool dying on the vine wasn't appealing. I tried Atom for about a week, but it was slower than ST2, lacked a broad ecosystem, and, well... JavaScript.

So one day I decided to revisit Emacs. Hey! It grew a package manager! Since that afternoon, I've had zero desire to look back. Emacs will outlive me and my children, will support every new language and tool that comes along, and will always be Free. There's nothing out there good enough to make me consider switching.

PS, in concession: I could make the same cases for Vim and its grandchildren. Once you've learned them, if they do what you need then there's very little compelling reason to change.

Comment: Re:Make it more expensive ? (Score 2) 243

by Just Some Guy (#49729901) Attached to: Why Apple Ditched Its Plan To Build a Television

A big reason for drinking Starbucks is to show other people that you can afford it.

LOLWUT? Starbucks in cheaper than most of the local coffee ships near me. I love love LOVE the Philz Coffee downstairs but I'm not kidding myself about the price: that Ecstatic Iced isn't gonna pay for itself. Coffee Bar was better (and more expensive) yet. Around SF, at least, people buy Starbucks for the same reasons they buy McDonald's: it's a known quality and not expensive. It won't be the best you've had, but it'll be exactly like the last cup you bought and it won't break the bank.

On my block, Starbucks is the opposite of conspicuous consumption. It's what you get when you're in a hurry or aren't from around here.

Comment: Answer: because it was an awful idea (Score 2) 243

by Just Some Guy (#49729015) Attached to: Why Apple Ditched Its Plan To Build a Television

I bought and use an Apple TV all the time. It's how my kids watch Netflix, and how we rent movies 99% of the time. I love it. I would never buy an Apple television, though, because 1) I like my Vizio, 2) I don't want to have to upgrade my display just because an input device broke or became obsolete, and 3) there literally zero advantage to that arrangement instead of an external box connected via HDMI.

Lots of devices have built-in screens and it makes sense for them. I wouldn't buy a separate screen for a display-less laptop, for instance; making CPU + display into a single unit is perfectly reasonable. There is no reason at all for that to be true in the living room, though. How many sizes should they make? Does everyone get a 60" Apple Television even if they have a tiny living room, or will I be squinting at a 30" Apple Television from across the room? Which pixel technology will they choose? Eh, no thanks. Component systems still have their place, and the living room entertainment system is probably the perfect example of that.

I love my cheap little Apple TV and will probably upgrade it to the next model when that comes out. I don't love it so much that I'd throw out a perfectly usable display panel as part of the deal.

Comment: Re:Careful betting on future technology (Score 2) 298

Oh hell, that happens with keyboards too. I've posted before that while working on a time crunch problem, the manager of my manager was hanging around and keeping his nose in her business. She was trying to type up a synopsis of the current status to email to *his* boss and he was continually asking her questions and pressuring her to hurry the solution up. Fortunately for her I was standing there to answer questions for her memo because in the middle of a sentence she wrote "fuck you". I leaned way over to block his vision and pointed saying "I think you have a typo there ."

You can fool all the people all of the time if the advertising is right and the budget is big enough. -- Joseph E. Levine

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