Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:OK Another one (Score 1) 89

by Paul server guy (#47791245) Attached to: Astronomers Find What May Be the Closest Exoplanet So Far

Unfortunately, people on this site that specializes in technology, don't actually believe that generational spaceships are possible. Either now or in all of our future timeframe.

I tried to make a similar argument about 2 months ago, and got nothing but grief for postulating such an idea.

Not true, there are many people who believe generational spaceships are possible, in the near term. The problem isn't the tech, the problem is the same for /all/ space projects.

Who's going to pay for it?

Comment: Re:Turn it around: (Score 3, Insightful) 130

For all I detest the fact, i still hold that anyone should be free to be a complete fucking idiot. If you hold ultra fundamentalist nutjobs as being limitable speech you are simply paving the way for rationalism to be limited in the advent of a fucking moronic demographic spike. Overestimating future generations is kind of what has fucked america over already.

Comment: Re: Not Just Phones (Score 1) 281

Well, reason #1 would probably be a massive class action lawsuit that would destroy the coveted relationship that these companies have with their user base.

Class actions won't mean shit when there's enough {bribe} money on the other side. (Sony winning most of them for example. http://www.groklaw.net/article...)

And, based on consumer sales, not much of anythign will do anythign to these companies. All we can do as consumers is keep a ready supply of lube around.

Comment: The only thing constant is change (Score 5, Interesting) 171

by adosch (#47463135) Attached to: Is the Software Renaissance Ending?
I read Matt's blog posting and I do have to say it sounds like his underlying issue is less of a quandary with a code renaissance being over and more of the drowning complexy and exhaustion involved with today's changing technology world from a code slingers perspective. Reading his blurb touching on a few profound things I find myself doing more and more as I get older in the tech industry: enjoying the simplicity of hacking shell or automative code in a text editor without launching an IDE, still having algorithmic thought processes and approaches, documenting less and thinking more. It sounds like his interests have just shifted and probably for the better. There's tons of shit that I look at on my shelves: projects started, topics heavily bookmarked in myriad of O'reilly books, half-finished circuit design on breadboards, code lying around here or there. It's just that: what was important now isn't and you're trying to just simplify the black hole of tech that was once an intriguing and mind-blowing ordeal.

Comment: Hardware Evolution Blues (Score 1) 202

by adosch (#47448853) Attached to: New Raspberry Pi Model B+

Although I appreciate the changes in the B+ model and board layout changes, it does kind of suck that the natural improvement evolution of the Raspberry Pi is wiping out the 'coolness' I have with the three (what seems to feel like) aging Raspberry Pi original model B's (256MB version) I own from back in ~2011 into early 2012.

I'm still trying to appreciate them for what they are, so I'll still get the mileage out of them. $35 isn't a high price tag, but to upgrade 'X' of them all to chase small features is going to create very unstable 12oz beer bottle coasters over time with little used market re-coup costs.

Comment: Re:Auctioning money? (Score 3, Insightful) 101

Fine, but that doesn't change my basic point. Why bother with an auction that will necessarily get less than an open market?

The same reason you wholesale anything; You get a transaction that moves a large volume quickly. Basically all consumer goods you buy in any kind of branded store works this way, Wholesalers, whether manufacturers or a middleman, sell large volume to companies who then take the burden of distribution but reap the benefits of charging retail price and profiting on the difference between that and the wholesale cost plus infrastructure/logistics costs. The wholesaler gets the benefit of moving a large volume at an agreed upon price and not having to worry about inventory control, distribution, or logistics of getting it to the consumer.

This is not strange, or even strange at all. Side benefit in this case, they get the auction entry fee from everyone bidding regardless of whether they win and also a look into who is interested in amassing a large quantity of bitcoins.

Honestly this shouldn't require explanation,

Comment: Re:ping rate (Score 1) 131

If you ever have extended occupancy a computer geek, and 8 lbs of discretionary cargo, there will be a game server on the moon. Maybe a few more pounds if you need your own power source.

Http:\\OpenLuna.org will bring them there when they build their outpost. http:\\Keplershipyards.com is already planning on integrating "Recreational software" into the computers that they are building for OL to run the outpost and to integrate into the suit. Since the suits have VR and remote control consoles for the rovers, (using VR gloves and such) AR full-body COD anyone?

Comment: This piece misinterprets the research. (Score 1) 293

According to Stephen Braham This piece misinterprets the research. There's pretty much zero chance that Sag A* is a wormhole (and, given that I did my PhD on them, I'm biased to wanting wormholes)! The paper is about how you'd know if it was, and not on any evidence that Sag A* isn't a usual accretion-formed BH.

Comment: What about the SysAdmin? (Score 2) 226

by adosch (#46769643) Attached to: How 'DevOps' Is Killing the Developer

Horrible assumption that you think developers are top-dogs, Jeff. I've seen many cases were DevOps role FAILED for competent developers because, in the cases I've seen, this is true:

* Your smartest developer may be just that when it comes to language, software architecture and platform development, but their operating system, networking, hardware infrastructure knowledge + background is not even hobby-shop at best.

* They've always had an ops or engineering crew to throw their code at, figure out how to integrate it, and NEVER had to support it.

* Ego problems thinking they are 'above' remedial automation --- which most of the time doesn't involve a real development language, just scripting.

Out of those two things alone, I've always heard the: "Well we need a sys-admin/engineer now because we are spending more time trying to manage systems, not really sure how or what to automate, and it's really taking time away from me getting back to the kind of development I, as the developer want to do." Which is the polar opposite of the two points I mentioned above.

Overdrawn? But I still have checks left!

Working...