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Submission + - Greens call for end of corporate personhood ( 1

guzzlersden writes: 109 Green Party candidates nationwide are calling for a "Green New Deal" to end the legal doctrine of corporate personhood, which grants corporations constitutional rights that had previously been reserved for people.

Submission + - Mobile Passwords: When 3 Is Better Than 1 (

itwbennett writes: Entering passwords on smartphones is unnecessarily painful, says security research Markus Jakobsson. In addition to having to enter text on a tiny keyboard, there's no auto-correct feature, but there could be and it could be used securely if we use pass sentences instead of passwords. Consider the pass sentence 'frog work flat'. How secure is that? 'The frequencies of these words in the English language are 10 to the -5.13, 10 to the -3.20 and 10 to the -4.36. The combination therefore occurs with probability 10 to the -12.7 — the product of those three frequency values — or approximately 2 to the -42. That is a strong credential,' says Jakobsson.

Submission + - President Obama to appear on Mythbusters ( 2

Muondecay writes: President Obama will be featured in the December 8th MythBusters episode, "Archimedes Solar Ray," during which he will challenge Adam and Jamie to revisit an ancient and somewhat controversial myth: Did Greek scientist and polymath Archimedes set fire to an invading Roman fleet using only mirrors and the reflected rays of the sun during the Siege of Syracuse? This is part of a White House effort to highlight the importance of science education.
The Internet

Submission + - What did people do on the internet before the Web? ( 3

ribuck writes: "The web wasn't invented until 1989, and didn't really catch on until 1993 when the Mosaic browser was released. But the internet is much older than the web. So how did people use the internet in the good old pre-web days? There was email, of course, and FTP, and also a bunch of other interesting protocols. If HTTP and HTML hadn't come along, we might just have enhanced Gopher instead. Many of the pre-web protocols are still in active use, but sometimes it's only nostalgia that keeps them going. Try typing finger at the command line to see how blogging works using steam technology."

Submission + - Government Approves First US Off-Shore Wind Farm (

RobotRunAmok writes: In a groundbreaking decision that some say will usher in a new era of clean energy, U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar said today he was approving the nation's first offshore wind farm, the controversial Cape Wind project off of Cape Cod. The project has undergone years of environmental review and political maneuvering, including opposition from the late Senator Edward M. Kennedy, whose home overlooks Nantucket Sound, and from Wampanoag Indian tribes who complained that the 130 turbines, which would stand more than 400 feet above the ocean surface, would disturb spiritual sun greetings and possibly ancestral artifacts and burial grounds on the seabed. But George Bachrach, president of the Environmental League of Massachusetts, hailed the decision, saying it was "a critical step toward ending our reliance on foreign oil and achieving energy independence. "

NASA Solar Satellite's First Sun Images 103

coondoggie writes "NASA today showed off the amazing first pictures of the Sun taken from its 6,800lb Solar Dynamics Observatory flying at an orbit 22,300 miles above Earth. The first images show a variety of activity NASA says provide never-before-seen detail of material streaming outward and away from sunspots. Others show extreme close-ups of activity on the sun's surface. The spacecraft also has made the first high-resolution measurements of solar flares in a broad range of extreme ultraviolet wavelengths."

New Speed Cameras Catch You From Space Screenshot-sm 351

A new kind of speed camera that uses satellites to measure average speed over long distances is being tested in Britain. The "Speedspike" system combines plate reading technology with a global positioning satellite receiver to calculate average speed between any two points in the area being monitored. From the article: "Details of the trials are contained in a House of Commons report. The company said in its evidence that the cameras enabled 'number plate capture in all weather conditions, 24 hours a day.' It also referred to the system's 'low cost' and ease of installation." I can't wait to see the episode of MythBusters where they try to avoid getting a speeding ticket from a satellite.

Comment Re:They are wrong (Score 1) 508

So - you are assuming that space science is solely NASA then?

No. They're just the lion's share. My view is that for space science, they probably outweigh the rest of the planet, including the DoD's expenditures on space science.

What about developing the engineering and technological means to allow for long stays on the moon? Spend 5-10 years researching astronaut safety, building materials, biospheres, ecological and environmental surveys for using natural resources - then go to the moon for extended stays of weeks and months? Using this technology to then go to Mars? It is the choice of where to put the limited funds for the next 5 years, 10 years... where will it be of the most use?

Personally, I'd rather the US's budget were reduced by a factor of two or three. Elimination of NASA funding as a side effect would be acceptable. But since it isn't going to happen, yes, with the proviso that extended stays mean stays of years, not weeks or months. Unmanned space science missions should take advantage of well known economies of scale (such as reuse of technology and standardized components, building more probes at a time to spread out development costs, and missions that favor smaller, more frequent launches over larger, less frequent launches. And such research should support US economic needs, such as figuring out how to make money from activities and resources in space.

Comment Re:Bad summary (Score 1) 139

to deference any NULL pointer would effectively be calling that function, assuming this memory mapping really works.

It's not as simple as that. If the kernel contained a read access to that pointer in the exploitable code, it would still perform a read, even though the memory location contained executable code. The only thing would be, that now you would have the numerical value of the instructions in a register, that's it.

But in many cases, the NULL pointer dereference would still be exploitable, it would only be slightly more complicated.

Hardware Hacking

Where To Start In DIY Electronics? 301

pyrosine writes "I've been thinking about this for a while and have no idea where to start. I have little or no previous experience in electronics — just what is covered in GCSE physics (wiring a plug and resistors — not much, I know). The majority of my interest lies in the wireless communication side of the field — i.e. ham radios and CB — but I am also interested in how many things work, one example being speakers, simply to better understand it. I would preferably like to start with some form of practical guide rather than learning the theory first, but where I would find such a walkthrough eludes me."

Help Me Get My Math Back? 467

nwm writes "I am trying to refresh my math skills back to the point that I can take college-level statistics and calculus courses. I took everything through AP calculus in high school, had my butt kicked by college calculus, and dropped out shortly thereafter. Twenty+ years later, I need to take a few math courses to wrap up a degree. I've dug around some and found a few sites with useful information, but I'm hoping the Slashdot crowd can offer some good resources — sites, books, programs, online tutors, etc. I really don't want to have to take a series of algebra-geometry-trig 'pre-college' level courses (each at full cost and each a semester long) just to warm my brain up; I'd much rather find some resources, review, cram, and take the placement test with some confidence. Any suggestions?"

Virus-Detecting "Lab On a Chip" Developed At BYU 71

natharward writes "A new development in nano-level diagnostic tests has been applied as a lab on a chip that successfully screened viruses entirely by their size. The chip's traps are size-specific, which means even tiny concentrations of viruses or other particles won't escape detection. For medicine, this development is promising for future lab diagnostics that could detect viruses before symptoms kick in and damage begins, well ahead of when traditional lab tests are able to catch them. Aaron Hawkins, the BYU professor leading the work, says his team is now gearing up to make chips with multiple, progressively smaller slots, so that a single sample can be used to screen for particles of varying sizes. One could fairly simply determine which proteins or viruses are present based on which walls have particles stacked against them. After this is developed, Hawkins says, 'If we decided to make these things in high volume, I think within a year it could be ready.'"

Google Shooting For Smartphone Universal Translator 178

nikki4 writes to tell us that in giving some major improvement tweaks to its existing voice recognition tool for the Smartphone, Google is aiming for new translator software that will provide instant translation of foreign languages. "The company has already created an automatic system for translating text on computers, which is being honed by scanning millions of multi-lingual websites and documents. So far it covers 52 languages, adding Haitian Creole last week. Google also has a voice recognition system that enables phone users to conduct web searches by speaking commands into their phones rather than typing them in. Now it is working on combining the two technologies to produce software capable of understanding a caller’s voice and translating it into a synthetic equivalent in a foreign language."

Artificial intelligence has the same relation to intelligence as artificial flowers have to flowers. -- David Parnas