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Comment Re:Historical data (Score 1) 23

In Oregon, the reason voters set yearly minimum wage increases into law was precisely to increase the buying power of the poor and increase the local food movement economy, thus revitalizing an agricultural sector that was dying due to Chilean imports.

The down side- it makes our workforce less elastic. We continually trail unemployment nationally by two points, and we're the first to suffer from a recession and the last to recover from it.

Comment Re:This! (Score 1) 130

Are they selling an object like a car or a service like access to a fairground?

Even ignoring quasi-legal arguments like software licensing, I'm inclined to feel this is an example of the latter.

This is not like selling costume packs for Skyrim, where both parties were involved in a transaction presented as a purchase of an object (again, legal arguments like licensing aside - user buys a box called "Skyrim", expects that to be the end of their relationship with Bethesda and Bethesda expected that to be the end of their relationship with the user, save for bug fixes and purchases of other products or services)

This is a straightforward "You pay us $X for access to our service.

And as such, just as paying money to access to a fairground doesn't mean you can reconfigure the rollercoaster, likewise you don't get to mod a multi-user game just because you paid money for access to it.

User Journal

Journal Journal: mostly hasta la pasta

Unfortunately the mix in the journal community long ago ceased being what it had been, so I've done the long-overdue thing and switched my new JE notification from web to email.

Comment Re:More specifically... (Score 1) 173

The reverse makes sense but the above not at all. Nuclear is a 24/7/365 thing with shutdowns every few years due to the hassles getting them stopped and started so it makes zero sense to use it to fill gaps. Solar on the other hand has very small units that can be brought on or off line easily to cover consumption, as are other things with small unit sizes.
If you want nukes it means committing to a huge industry and using it as the main game. It doesn't come in small sizes unless you can justify an utter fortune to power a spacecraft or a submarine.

Comment Re:Geothermal (Score 2, Insightful) 173

It all depends. There's stuff already heated by lava that's pretty damned hot. There's stuff heated by deep uranium deposits that is pretty damned hot. There's water in flooded mine tunnels under Glasgow that's fairly cold so setting up a solar hot water to cold mine water heat engine was really cheap. Plucking a number out of the air with zero context is like saying all cars are yellow based on seeing a New York Taxi.
So the mystery here is why you are suggesting all cars are yellow. Unfortunately this site is now popular enough to attract the attention of "social media workers" doing the astroturf thing, so that's an annoying possibility.

Comment Re:What's the point? (Score 1) 154

Why would someone eat something that contains almost no nourishment

To enjoy the pleasure of food without contributing as much to obesity? cf. the entire diet-foods industry.

That said, I've had some of these yam-like noodle products, and the ones I got tasted like hell and digested even worse. Hopefully a large dose of cellulose can fix that. I'd love to have some chee cheong fun with the majority of calories coming from the sauce and meats!

You need either carbs or fat just to survive.

Or protein.

Comment Re:Disposable screens for disposable products? (Score 1) 218

Your old OLED screens don't compare to modern OLED displays - they're at least two generations behind. And black bars? That's the controller, not the 'phosphors'. It could be that a certain OLED panel had a bad production run, but try to keep proper separation of concerns.

A 4-year-old GS3 AMOLED screen looks great compared to any iPhone screen produced today, and the newer ones are even better (I considered switching to a 'better' phone (circuit-board level) after running a GS4 for years, and just couldn't go back to LED). Apple is switching to better technology obviously (and good for them).

Most importantly, the iPhone OLED screen will last longer than security updates will be available for the device. Be a responsible netizen and recycle the thing in 2023. Or go with an open product instead to extend the safe lifetime of your purchase.

Comment Re: Humn.... That one is hard. (Score 2, Interesting) 297

Crom, I have never prayed to you before. I have no tongue for it. No one, not even you, will remember if we were good men or bad. Why we fought, or why we died. All that matters is that two stood against many. That's what's important! Valor pleases you, Crom... so grant me one request. Grant me revenge! And if you do not listen, then to HELL with you!

Comment Re:Wrong way around (Score 1) 737

Better explanation:

sysvinit is widely considered awful by most distro maintainers.

How do we know this? Well, because distro maintainers have been trying to get away from it for years. Even when everything was run from 'init' there have been multiple refactorings of /etc/*.d to try to produce a better start up environment.

At some point, some distributions, notably Ubuntu, switched to an initd replacement called Upstart. Because they were desperate to get away from sysvinit. ChromeOS, possibly the most widely used Desktop GNU/Linux distribution, was also an early adopter of Upstart. Again because it was considered better - more reliable, faster, etc - than horrible old init.

So why are they switching to systemd? Because systemd is considered better than Upstart (which in turn is considered better than sysvinit.) systemd has a better process model, and doesn't ignore required functionality (yes, the same program that configures devices at start up probably should configure USB devices that are plugged in dynamically, and the same processes that configure the network based upon what devices are plugged in at start up should probably configure the network based upon what devices become available later, etc. So yes, this supposed "monolithic" approach is basic common sense.)

Most of those complaining about systemd are actually fighting an argument they lost in 2006, when Upstart became part of Ubuntu 6.10. They've lost it not just in the GNU/Linux world, but also in, say, the Mac OS X world, where sysvinit was unceremoniously ejected back in 2005. Or the Solaris world. etc.

You know, I could understand this if we were actually losing anything by switching to systemd. The desire to remove X11 from *ix, for example, replacing it with a dumb graphics engine with a fraction of the functionality, I think is genuinely a tragedy. We'll lose much of what made *ix what it is if and when Wayland is adopted. But systemd doesn't remove anything. It's fast, efficient, and it fixes huge holes in GNU/Linux, problems we've been aware of since the mid-nineties but haven't had the spine to fix.

It's something to be welcomed.

Comment Re:aren't these aimed to prevent not detect? (Score 1) 151

As for the whole "France has more experience in terrorism", a simple Wikipedia search proves you wrong

For the knowledge of others to be useful some understanding on your part that you can link it to is required. You've just given an example of a failure in that respect and in using a metric for a purpose it was never intended for. That metric does not prove what you have written in any way.

Just accept the criticism at face value.
I'm not even going as far as you did in telling you what to do.

I'm just pointing out that others who know more than you do don't really need your very stupid suggestion and it's likely to annoy the shit out of people like me who are in no way experts so would not attempt to run down those who are - yet someone with less understanding than would be expected in the general population is having a go!

Comment Re:W.C. Fields Does Politics (Score 1) 8

What could they possibly reveal about Trump that is worse than what everyone already knows about him? He's widely known to be Mafia connected, and he's made statements at Republican primary TV debates about bribing politicians.

(And add to that the fact that any "scandal" is likely to be another thing the establishment cares about and nobody else does.)

I doubt, at this point, even dead girl/live boy would do it.

Comment Re:aren't these aimed to prevent not detect? (Score 1) 151

And another thing - why should the country that fruitlessly warned the US Marines to watch out for Hezbolla truck bombs in Beirut take advice from you? Maybe unlike you they have been thinking of the problems and dealing with some of them for many years. I'll give you time to look up what I've written about since you probably don't even know about that major incident because it happened outside California.

At the source of every error which is blamed on the computer you will find at least two human errors, including the error of blaming it on the computer.