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Comment: Re:Still not good enough. (Score 1) 421

by Tablizer (#48937799) Attached to: FCC Officially Approves Change In the Definition of Broadband

Here are a few acronyms that most citizens hate: IRS, NSA, CIA, DHS ....

I hate dental visits also, but I still go. And citizens generally prefer "protection" from foreign threats. Whether it's all warranted or not is highly debatable. DHS wouldn't exist if not for the 911 attacks. The pendulum of public opinion on such seems to swing back and forth, depending on attacks.

Comment: Re:Still not good enough. (Score 1) 421

by Tablizer (#48933633) Attached to: FCC Officially Approves Change In the Definition of Broadband

history has shown over and over and over again that big government is very bad.

Too much of anything is bad. Some water is good for you, too much and you drown. Some big company influence is good for us; but too much and we get corporate fascism and/or corporate communism (which may degenerate to regular communism).

The slippery-slope fallacy can be used to justify any position.

Overly-influential banks already had a big hand in crashing the world economy recently and almost got us into another Great Depression. (True, gov't mistakes contributed to it, but run-away greed was the main cause.) I thank Big Gov't for having prevented another Great Depression...in this case.

Comment: Re:Still not good enough. (Score 2) 421

by Tablizer (#48933477) Attached to: FCC Officially Approves Change In the Definition of Broadband

What conservatives often fail to grasp is that "less government" and "more competition" are sometimes at odds. We need referees to enforce a competitive environment. It's too easy for big co's to buy away competition. We want them using their resources to make better & cheaper mousetraps, not to keep out other mousetrap makers.

Comment: Re:That doesn't sound bad (Score 1) 421

by Tablizer (#48933325) Attached to: FCC Officially Approves Change In the Definition of Broadband

So 87% of Americans have Microsoft Access. Thanks for clearing that up :-)

Technically 100% of Americans have potential broadband access; it would just cost an arm and leg to get it in many places. For example, a billionaire may have high-speed satellite connections if their mansion is in a remote area. Having access is not a "Boolean value".

If one wants a practical formal definition of "having access to broadband", then one may have to apply a price threshold.

Life is a game. Money is how we keep score. -- Ted Turner

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