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Comment: Re:Boycott General Mills' products (Score 1) 214

by Rick Zeman (#46784481) Attached to: Click Like? You May Have Given Up the Right To Sue

'nuf said.

That's the only way to get companies to stop doing shit like this. Hit them where it hurts...the bottom line.

$18 billion in annual sales.

Good fucking luck putting a dent in that bottom line. Or more to the point, finding enough consumers who actually give a shit.

'nuff said.

More the latter than the former. But I can do my part and sleep at night.

Comment: Re:Send a message (Score 1) 214

by Rick Zeman (#46784467) Attached to: Click Like? You May Have Given Up the Right To Sue

Don't buy their products. Boycott.

People keep suggesting things like this.

Sony puts a rootkit on a CD? Boycott. Apple tells you you're holding your iPhone wrong? Boycott.

Problem is it's nonsense. A boycott is the fiscal equivalence of silence. Your favorite restaurant changes the way they make ? Boycott is the equivalent of "go somewhere else." Well, that sucks. How about "tell the manager/owner you don't like the new recipe"? Try communicating that you're unhappy and why with them. Otherwise your absence means nothing. It's statistically lost in seasonal variance, for instance.

So, for this, send a letter to the company explaining your problem. Send them a "do not like" letter, basically. Boycott alone is meaningless.

The problem with that in this case is then you have a relationship with them by their standard and are then bound by their TOS. :-)

Comment: Re:They already "gave back" (Score 2) 267

by Rick Zeman (#46742365) Attached to: Apple's Spotty Record of Giving Back To the Tech Industry

and they've done their best at tax avoidance depriving each country where they trade of valuable tax revenue

In violation of the law? No? Better change the laws then. I damn well take my mortgage deductions, etc, when I do my taxes. I owe that to me. If Apple (and all of the other companies....) take advantage of loopholes and other deductions it's because they owe that to their shareholders. Don't like it? Get the laws changed.

Comment: Re:Inspiration (Score 3, Interesting) 267

by Rick Zeman (#46742339) Attached to: Apple's Spotty Record of Giving Back To the Tech Industry

I think thats down to Xerox Parc, not Apple

Umm, other than spouting a cliché, have you ever seen what PARC designed? No such thing as direct object manipulation (you clicked on an icon and then got a menu; you couldn't do anything with that icon. Couldn't drag it, move it, double-click it.). No hierarchal space, nothing analogous to QuickDraw, etc. I could go on...

Just because a buggy also had 4 wheels doesn't mean your BMW is much of a derivative.

Comment: Article is flame bait. Or a troll. (Score 4, Informative) 267

by Rick Zeman (#46740069) Attached to: Apple's Spotty Record of Giving Back To the Tech Industry

"The company lists dozens of open source projects and components that it contributes code to: from the Apache web server"

And that, my friends, is what open source is all about. You use, you give code back.

The article title should really be "Apple's Spotty Record of Giving Monetarily To The Apache Foundation." To agree with that Apple should be giving them money is the moral equivalent of saying that users should have to pay to use Apache.

Comment: Re:Nope (Score 4, Insightful) 117

by Rick Zeman (#46554637) Attached to: One Billion Android Devices Open To Privilege Escalation

What the summary fails to explain properly is that this vulnerability only works with permissions that are new when the device gets an OS update. Say you install an app and it asks for permission to use NFC, but your device's OS is old and doesn't support NFC (pre 4.0 I think). You install it anyway. Then you upgrade the OS and now it supports NFC. The app then gets the NFC permission without any further prompts or warning to the user.

That is certainly an issue, but not the huge gaping security flaw the summary makes it sound like. Apps can only ask for normal permissions that the OS offers, not bypass security or the sandbox. It's basically a UI issue.

Yeah, and since the carriers update Android devices so infrequently the threat exposure is more theoretical than practical.

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