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Comment: How much? (Score 1) 71

by fyngyrz (#47961545) Attached to: Trouble In Branson-Land, As Would-Be Space Tourists Get Antsy Over Delays

For a flight that doesn't reach orbit and stay there with the environment in 0G for at least a few orbits, I wouldn't pay anything. Heck, I won't pay a commercial airline to fly because the ratio of inconvenience to convenience+enjoyment is too high between the (id|patr)iot act's enforced paranoia and the seating designed by one-legged, one-armed engineers. Now an oceangoing cruise liner, that's something else again. I loves me a nice cruise. It's even worth going first class, which it definitely isn't in a commercial airliner.

However, for a flight that *does* go to orbit and stays a few turns, and doesn't require a spacesuit, and for which I could have a very private cubby with a view for two for the orbital duration, I might part with as much as five thousand for two seats, just for those few hours. They'd have to let me take my camera, though.

Which means I'm not going to get to go. :) Unless they build a space elevator or several in my lifetime. And apparently the materials science there is either too difficult, or nearly so. Oh well. There's always Firefly reruns.

Comment: Re:I'm wrong, shouldn't figure trillions in my hea (Score 2) 368

You forgot to include the economic boost from the people now able to return to work faster/not dying/getting preventative care so they never get sick. Also the lowered cost of care for people who now can get treated before it becomes an emergency. Most of the cost of Obamacare is recognizing costs that were, until now, hidden.

Comment: Re:This is supposed to be the *WAY* they do their (Score 1) 368

So what you're saying is they should delay care until it becomes an emergency? Or are you saying if they don't get treated the problem will go away?

What you really want to say is that they don't deserve to be treated and should rot in the streets. Go on, let it out.

Comment: Partisan bickering (Score 1) 368

Fingerpointing is more important than solutions. This is a common and deep-rooted problem in politics, one that crosses party lines without pause. We have to stop this incompetence... What's the best way to accomplish this? I know! Let's start bickering about whether the Democrats or Republicans are at fault!

Comment: Re:Why I wired Ethernet in most rooms (and no WiFi (Score 1) 281

by fyngyrz (#47955245) Attached to: Slashdot Asks: What's In Your Home Datacenter?

2- Safety concerns: with baby and/or young children I felt I would rather not add RF generator inside my home. I know we are immersed in RF from everywhere, making some a few meters away is another level. I didn't want to add that. Just in case.

Ham radio operators -- of which I am one -- spend their lives immersed in more RF at various frequencies from kHz to GHz than you can possibly compare to unless you work at a broadcast radio or television station. And hams are one of the oldest demographics in the USA. So many 80 and 90 year olds, it's really kind of amusing. RF is not your enemy at wifi router and cellphone levels. Not even close.

I've been pretty much bathed in RF for the last forty years. I'm very healthy other than a few allergies I've had since I was a kid. Of course, I'm active, too -- but if RF at these levels was a problem, I'd *have* a problem by now.

Comment: Re:I've never shorted a stock (Score 1) 98

by TheRaven64 (#47953737) Attached to: Microsoft Kills Off Its Trustworthy Computing Group
XP also tweaked the VM subsystem in a way that was quite noticeable if you had more than about 256MB of RAM (better performance), but the main feature it added was remote desktop (although only in the Pro version). I was quite tempted to upgrade from 2K for the remote desktop stuff.

Comment: Re:What for? (Score 1) 182

by TheRaven64 (#47953219) Attached to: Why Apple Should Open-Source Swift -- But Won't
I'm not a huge fan. The goal of D was to produce a better C++, but if you're designing a new language then C++ really isn't where I'd choose to start. It's not as bad as Ruby (I can't imagine the kind of person who would look at Smalltalk and say 'what this language really needs is Perl-like syntax'. Actually, I can't imagine the kind of person who'd say that about any language. Including Perl). Rust is probably the modern language that I like the most.

Comment: Re:Not answered in review (Score 1) 212

by fyngyrz (#47947485) Attached to: iOS 8 Review

Under IOS, apps aren't kept in an ordered system collection the way they are in Android. If they're on the device at all, they're somewhere on a page or within a folder, either where you put them, or where the system put them (always on a page) if you have not interfered. And finding them, if you don't know where they are, is a matter of typing the name into the search.

But -- just like Android -- you can have a lot of pages, a lot of folders, and you may or may not remember where a particular app or shortcut is located in your own personal folder/page setup. But then there is IOS search, which can find anything.

Under either OS, if you can't remember where they are, and you can't remember the name, it's down to looking around until you find them.

One of the arguments for folder organization is that if you even know the type of app it is -- for instance, if it is a photography app -- then if you're consistent at install time, you can look just in there, and it will be there, leaving you a lot fewer apps to check through until you find it.

But IOS has low limits on how many apps can be in a folder, and it doesn't allow subfolders, which seriously impacts how well you can really use them for that kind of organization. In my case, IOS's folder paradigm is insufficient to my needs. Android isn't significantly better, either.

Comment: .5 seconds per cut (Score 1) 35

by Iamthecheese (#47934127) Attached to: Are Matt's Robot Hexapods Creepy or Cute? (Video)

If the only way to make your video more compelling is to jiggle it like a twelve year old with his first Penthouse maybe you should be using different subject matter. Not only has the video of 10,000 cuts been done a million times it wasn't that interesting in the first place.

As for the robot I couldn't judge. Maybe a video of it lasting more than two seconds would help.

If you have to ask how much it is, you can't afford it.

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