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Comment Re:Predictions, so far, have been accurate (Score 1) 529

Look up "polar amplification" or "stratospheric cooling", these are phenomena that were seen in models before they were observed in nature. There are about a dozen such phenomena that have been discovered via climate models.

BTW: Climate models are based on finite element analysis, AKA numerical integration. Statistics doesn't come into it until you compare the results to historical data (hindcasting). Hindcasting is the standard method to test any FEA model, doesn't matter if you are modeling the casting of an engine block or the earth's climate.

Last I check you need at least eight decimal places and statistically significant sample not to be laughed out of most fields.

In cosmology and astrophysics getting a result that is within a few orders of magnitude is considered "accurate". In archeology a radioactive dating result with 10% is considered a "good result". Science isn't all about measuring the width of a proton, other than particle physics, there are actually very few scientific fields that "demand" eight decimal places of accuracy.

The problem I have with critiques of climate models like yours is they are non-sequiturs and born from ignorance, they don't make any sense because they are sourced from MSM articles that (for political reasons) aim to convince you that modeling physical phenomena is some kind of scam that scientists are using to make money. If you want to critique the models then write a paper explaining why you need "eight nines" to convincingly demonstrate to others that the north pole is melting. There are lists of rebuttals to these fake critiques on the web, skepticalscience is one of the better ones, I'm sure you will find a few of your favorite talking points torn to shreds on that page..

Comment Re:What's a DLL? (Score 3, Interesting) 151

It's no longer a problem with MS libraries but it can still be a problem with third party dll's, the problem is not that different to having symlinks point to multiple versions of an .so file in unix. In both cases it works when done correctly, but it's easy to get the wires crossed if you're not careful.

Comment Re:What's a DLL? (Score 3, Informative) 151

There is no "bug" with the installers or windows, the machine has been compromised prior to running the software.

TFA is a "beat up" (likely paid for by Oracle), it does not explain how the attacker is able to put the compromised dll on the machine in the first place. If an attacker can put a random binary on your local drive then they already own your machine. What a random installer subsequently does on a compromised machine is irrelevant to how the machine was hacked.

Car analogy: If a miscreant cuts your brake line without your knowledge, it is not the manufacturer's fault that the brakes no longer work as advertised. If the manufacturer's can make it more difficult to cut the brake line that's great, but they cannot, and should not, be held accountable for malicious damage caused by someone who had unrestricted access to your brake line.

Comment Re: What's the viable alternative? (Score 1) 157

I left HS in 1975, boys in my HS were not allowed to learn typing, cooking or dressmaking. Girls were not allowed to learn woodwork, metalwork or mechanical drawing. I also thought typewriters were "cool" but never so much as touched one until I bought a second hand Apple ][ (a decade after leaving HS). I have been a degree qualified software developer for 25yrs now. I don't give a flying fuck if you are 'embarrassed' by my inability to touch type because it has had exactly zero impact on my career.

Comment Re:Boat still hasn't left port (Score 2) 267

First let me say I agree with your post, rapid deflation is as bad or worse as rapid inflation. Stability is desirable however it also has problems, "growth" is in many ways just another way of saying "increased efficiency. So today's widget should be cheaper than yesterday's because it's cheaper and easier to make than yesterday's widget. This may in turn spur more growth since you would expect the number of widgets sold to increase as their price decreases. In this way society as a whole benefits from growth, stopping that "natural" deflation means that those who control production reap ALL the benefits of growth. This is what people are currently pissed off about, the last three decades have seen little or no real wage growth, all that growth has gone into the pockets of those few who control production. Sure they helped create that growth, but no more than the people who clean the executive bathroom who gave them the time to do so.

Submission + - Winner of the 2015 Underhanded C Contest announced (underhanded-c.org)

Xcott Craver writes: The Underhanded C contest results have now been announced. This time the contest challenge was to cause a false match in a nuclear inspection scenario, allowing a country to remove fissile material from a warhead without being noticed. The winner receives $1000 from the Nuclear Threat Initiative.

Submission + - Receiving Meteor-M N2 Russian Weather Satellite Images

An anonymous reader writes: The Meteor-M N2 is a low orbit Russian weather satellite which broadcasts live weather satellite images, similar to the APT images produced by the NOAA satellites. But Meteor digital images are however much better as they are transmitted as a digital signal with an image resolution 12x greater than the aging analog NOAA APT signals. Radio enthusiasts are receiving images with hacked cheap digital TV dongles. There is even the AMIGOS project which stands for Amateur Meteor Images Global Observation System: users around the world can contribute Meteor images through the internet to create worldwide real-time coverage.

Submission + - Low Cost EEG Head-Sets Promise Virtual Reality Feedback Loops (thestack.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Researchers from the University of Memphis have found that it's possible to use a low-cost EEG device such as the $300 Emotiv Epoc to understand how a user is feeling — opening up the path to genuine psycho-biological feedback in virtual/augmented reality scenarios. The Epoc has been used, in combination with the Razer Hydra, to give users control over VR/AR environments, but integrating emotional feedback into VR environments heralds many new possibilities in the fields of medical research, gaming — and, of course, marketing research.

Submission + - Governments Could Censor Internet as US Relinquishes ICANN Oversight

dkatana writes: The US contract with ICANN,the organization responsible for registering all Internet domain names, ends on Sept. 30th. If the US government doesn’t act, it is effectively allowing the Chinese, Russian or others to censor a part of the Internet worldwide.

The concerns stem from controversy swirling around ICANN's 2012 decision to allow anyone to buy a Generic Top Level Domain (gTLD) and to resell the registrations of the domain without supervision.

The controversy started in 2011, when ICANN decided to auction off gTLDs as a way to raise funds. ICANN raised over $64 million from new gTLDs registrations. The .app TLD raised $25 million alone. Critics say the organization is not effectively upholding the lack of restrictions traditionally associated with TLDs.

Submission + - John Cleese Warns Campus Political Correctness Leading Towards 1984 (washingtonexaminer.com) 2

An anonymous reader writes: Ashe Schow writes at the Washington Examiner that, "The Monty Python co-founder, in a video for Internet forum Big Think, railed against the current wave of hypersensitivity on college campuses, saying he has been warned against performing on campuses. "[Psychiatrist Robin Skynner] said: 'If people can't control their own emotions, then they have to start trying to control other people's behavior,'" Cleese said. "And when you're around super-sensitive people, you cannot relax and be spontaneous because you have no idea what's going to upset them next." Cleese said that it's one thing to be "mean" to "people who are not able to look after themselves very well," but it was another to take it to "the point where any kind of criticism of any individual or group could be labeled cruel." Cleese added that "comedy is critical," and if society starts telling people "we mustn't criticize or offend them," then humor goes out the window. "With humor goes a sense of proportion," Cleese said. "And then, as far as I'm concerned, you're living in 1984." Cleese is just the latest comedian to lecture college students about being so sensitive.

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