Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Scientifically driven politics (Score 1) 344

FOIA requests can be used for targeted denial of service attacks, yes. Look at what this chick is doing to a public library: http://dc.uwm.edu/cgi/viewcont... She's just a dumb blonde (look at her kooky museum tour videos) but she's still managed to deluge the library with hundreds of FOIA requests (demanding shit like "all the data produced on all employees' computers over the past year", etc.) She's a lone kook not even employed by a major industry, and the library has to hire two full time employees just to respond to her FOIA requests. If they are legally required to respond to them, most small research teams would easily be shut down by a torrent of FOIA requests coming from deep-pocketed industries.

Comment: Re:Sort of dumb. (Score 2) 536

by jcr (#49618715) Attached to: Recruiters Use 'Digital Native' As Code For 'No Old Folks'

They didn't seem to think there was anything unusual about asking an interview candidate to spend an entire day doing pair programming with them on their own codebase.

Heh... I had a similar situation a month or so ago. Headhunter cold-called me, told me how hard they're looking for people with serious amounts of Mac experience, so I went to see the customer (startup over in Mountain View), product wasn't terribly interesting, and then the recruiter says they want me to come in for a "coding exercise" that should only take about four to six hours. I told him my rate for very short term projects, and he actually expected me to give them six hours of my time on spec.

I quit taking his calls.

-jcr

Comment: yes (Score 2) 383

by goombah99 (#49616873) Attached to: No, NASA Did Not Accidentally Invent Warp Drive

Yes,
      we have something here as exciting as cold fusion or polywater. it seems to violate newtons second law so people are looking for the escape clause. If it's real it's a huge deal because it means the fundamental problem of space travel--- bringing your propellant--- is permanently solved modulo the nitty gritty of making it more efficient.

On the otherhand, like polywater and cold fusion it's likely a reproducible experimental error that's not been identified yet. 3 groups have independently observed it so far.

My guess: it's just ions sputtered off the walls and accelerated or it's attraction towards an induced dipole in the room, neither of which would be exciting.

Comment: Re:Real reason (Score 3, Interesting) 548

by MillionthMonkey (#49616339) Attached to: Former HP CEO Carly Fiorina Announces Bid For White House

Carly spouted off on Saturday about net neutrality, and claimed that it was forced down our throats by lobbyists from Verizon and Comcast.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?...

And she says this as a former CEO of HP. I hope her campaign fails soon because her voice gives me faceslapping injuries.

Comment: CF: Comcast & Verizon wanted net neutrality (Score 1) 548

by MillionthMonkey (#49614765) Attached to: Former HP CEO Carly Fiorina Announces Bid For White House
This is what Carly Fiorina said about net neutrality two days ago:

The dirty little secret of that regulation, which is the same dirty little secret of Obamacare or Dodd-Frank or all of these other huge complicated pieces of regulation or legislation, is that they don't get written on their own, they get written in part by lobbyists for big companies who want to understand that the rules are going to work for them.... Who was in the middle of arguing for net neutrality? Verizon, Comcast, Google, I mean, all these companies were playing. They weren't saying "we don't need this," they were saying "we need it."

I think my grandmother could have done a better job running HP.

Comment: why do we need a walled garden? (Score 3, Insightful) 32

What's wrong with the plain old internet that we need this? I'm thinking that the notion here is that by making money by limiting access that they can give people free internet. AOL.com sort of started with the notion of monetizing a walled garden to offer cheaper internet access and it did spread to eventually giving access to the whole internet. But you could also describe indentured servitude in a similar rosie way of giving people opportunities.

Comment: This got moderated as "Flamebait"? (Score 1) 1054

Organise a "draw Jesus sodomizing Mary" contest in Texas and you'll get crazy Christian jihadists doing the same thing. If you set up an event specifically designed to insult/offend/antagonise a particular religion, you're always going to get a response like this from someone.

A carload of Christians must have pulled up and busted some down-mods into this post. The guy uses British spelling but he's absolutely correct. Organizing a "Jesus sodomizing Mary" contest in Texas would be a suicide attempt.

1 Mole = 007 Secret Agents

Working...