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Comment: Re:Am I responding to a troll? (Score 1) 150

by geekoid (#47715449) Attached to: Helsinki Aims To Obviate Private Cars

So you live on a farm, but you community needs sticker reminding the their food comes from farmers? That doesn't speak well for the average intelligence of your area. Everyone I know in the city knows their food comes from farmers and ranchers.

Anecdote:
I've never been run out of a city for being an Atheist, but I've been run out of several small communities. Literally.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C...

Comment: Re:which turns transport into a monopoly... (Score 1) 150

by swillden (#47715307) Attached to: Helsinki Aims To Obviate Private Cars

count me out... this sort of stuff just makes me want to live on a remote tropical island and spend my days fishing.

Do you also insist on owning your own elevator?

I insist on living and working in locations where I don't need an elevator... a remote tropical island would work well for this.

Comment: Re:which turns transport into a monopoly... (Score 1) 150

by geekoid (#47715241) Attached to: Helsinki Aims To Obviate Private Cars

You're right about the stadium, but his point is still valid. There are things that are far easier to do with group in Cities.

" I know a lot of people that live in New York and they never go to plays, theater, shows, concerts, or anything. "
Yes, the 12 people you know in New York city don't do any of the stuff.
There are hundreds of museums in New York. Many of them are very busy most of the time.

"For one thing, you could commute for that sort of thing"
that raises the bar and make it less likely to go there.

" you can't be telling me you live in the city to go to music concerts and football games."
err.. why not? I did.

Comment: Re:which turns transport into a monopoly... (Score 1) 150

by geekoid (#47715173) Attached to: Helsinki Aims To Obviate Private Cars

"we didn't live in anything like this density."
false.

" instinctually we have no bond with practically anyone in the city."
sounds like you have issues.

I don't live in a city, but walk across one everyday. I know many people by name. I know my neighbors by name.

My only problem with cities is noise.

Comment: Re:which turns transport into a monopoly... (Score 1) 150

by geekoid (#47715133) Attached to: Helsinki Aims To Obviate Private Cars

Culture, efficiency, knowledge sharing.
Yes, knowledge sharing happen in cities in ways that could never happen on the internet, and visa versa.

"It makes no sense."
It makes a lot of sense, actually.

"Doesn't anyone want to listen to music without having to worry about whether the neighbors will object? Doesn't anyone want a dog or a garden or just some space that is theirs?"
All of which is possible in a city

A city is safer. There have been many studies on this.
What economic issues? saving money? making more money?
What transportation issue? everything is within walking distance.

"just lots of stuff."
The only issue is you have a perception bias and you haven't actually bothered to do even basic research to back your opinion.

Comment: Re:or they could just NOT do it (Score 1) 119

by swillden (#47714911) Attached to: Google Receives Takedown Request Every 8 Milliseconds

The DMCA doesn'y say anything at all about search results. It's about hosting allegedly infringing material.

Courts in the US have held that linking directly to infringing content constitutes contributory infringement. Linking to another site isn't infringement just because the other site doesn't want you to link and benefit from their material (Tickemaster v Tickets.com established that), but linking to infringing material on another site does.

(Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer nor am I a Google spokesperson.)

Comment: Re:Google should be wary (Score 1) 119

by swillden (#47714817) Attached to: Google Receives Takedown Request Every 8 Milliseconds

While that may be true, the shareholders would riot in a damned hurry if the stock price were to tank because Google becomes less relevant.

Which would be relevant only if Larry, Sergey and Eric decided to allow it to be. As long as the three of them stay united, they outvote the rest of the shareholders combined.

Comment: Re:Google should be wary (Score 1) 119

by swillden (#47714799) Attached to: Google Receives Takedown Request Every 8 Milliseconds

These monopolies have billions in cash reserves to run them profitless for a very long time. Like decades.

Aside from the rather questionable assertion that Google is a monopoly, the company's cash reserves are nowhere near that large, or, rather, the company's expenses are much larger than you believe. Last I heard, Google has cash reserves of ~$60B (which, note, aren't actually cash; you don't leave that much capital sitting idle), and annual operational costs of about $40B. How long Google could continue to operate with hugely decreased revenues depends on just how far the revenues declined, and how much economizing the company could do, but I strongly doubt that it would be "decades". If all advertising revenue derived from the search engine disappeared and Google didn't economize at all, it would be bankrupt in maybe three years.

(Disclaimer: I work for Google, but I don't speak for Google. Everything in this post is derived from public information.)

Comment: Now just force society to accept transit limits (Score 1) 150

by swb (#47714759) Attached to: Helsinki Aims To Obviate Private Cars

Right now society (jobs, business interactions, legal obligations, etc) are generally structured around the common denominator of automobile transit. Your boss expects you to get to work around the basic parameters of what you can do in a car.

It's great to eliminate the car at some municipal level, now make "the bus didn't show up" or "there were no Uber/Zipcar/Car2Gos available" as some kind of universally accepted, legally unchangeable excuse for missing work, a court appearance, daycare pickup, etc.

One of the problems with the "yay, no cars!" world is that the rest of the world goes on making assumptions about people moving about that are based on the ability to get from point A to point B in a car.

Sure, in some places like NYC, a subway glitch will usually be accepted (in fact, I think they have a process for issuing excuse notes) and when I worked in a downtown office where there were a lot of bus riders, weather problems with the bus were generally not questioned or a cause for action.

But generally speaking society as a whole just assumes you're at fault.

The universe is like a safe to which there is a combination -- but the combination is locked up in the safe. -- Peter DeVries

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