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Comment: Re:re; You Should? (Score 1) 453

by Penguinisto (#46824123) Attached to: The US Public's Erratic Acceptance of Science

I don't think that's even the point. If people doubted the big bang because they carefully considered the arguments and found some flaws that made them doubt it, that would be fine. They doubt it because they can't imagine the terms involved, because a religious book says it isn't true, or mainly just because they don't want to think about it.

Point of order: Before anyone drags the eevil Xtians into the argument, the "Big Bang" theory was originally formed and promoted by not only scientists, but one of its pioneers (who reconciled Einstein's theories to it) was a Catholic Priest (who happened to also be a physicist and professor of same).

Why do I mention this? Well, given that the largest single Christian denomination on the planet (by far) involves Rome, and has *zero* problems with established and credible science (and has historically often led the way in it), let's not start tagging all Christians with what some heretic sect in Outer West Bumblefrig preaches, mm'kay?

Thx in advance.

Comment: Re:I don't think so (Score 1) 232

by Penguinisto (#46795909) Attached to: Russia Writes Off 90 Percent of North Korea Debt

They're a poor enough nation to notice it.

...which in turn gives them enough elbow-room to become a bit more belligerent, which in turn de-stabilizes the region. This in turn causes the US and Japan to have to spend their time doing something about it (China couldn't really give a frig, to be honest).

Speculative end result? Putin can take the rest of the Ukraine and any of the other former Soviet states with less attention being paid to it.

Comment: Re:Uh... change companies? (Score 1) 220

by Penguinisto (#46795787) Attached to: California Utility May Replace IT Workers with H-1B Workers

As somebody in his mid forties and is still successfully in the game, I can tell you authoritatively that you think you are winning, but you are not.

Agreed.

Dear GP:

* Wait until you're 35+, and start having a hard time getting up in the morning.

* As time progresses, you get to choose between family and your 50+ hour workweek (anything else leads to divorce, which even $100k/yr won't ameliorate.) Otherwise, you end up old, childless, and alone. You do not want that fate.

* In your 20's, burn-out is relatively unheard-of. In your 40's, it is something you'll spend a very huge chunk of your time trying to avoid at all costs.

* $100k/yr in Alabama might be nice, but $100k/yr in California ain't shit.

* Once you do reach your 40's, you'll start looking back a little.. and you may not like what you see. At nearly 45, I generally like the parts I see that didn't involve a cubicle (or desk). The only parts of my work history that I actually enjoy looking back at was either the USAF stint, or the teaching/professorial stint - not for the management (they mostly sucked ass), but for the feeling of awesomeness I get whenever I leaf through many of my former students' LinkedIn pages (or in the case of the USAF, times like whenever I stood on the flightline after fixing up a multi-million-dollar jet and gazed at the mountains nearby).

Long story short - you only get so much time to spend on this earth - do you want to spend it slaving away for some parade of uncaring asshats who think you're ultimately disposable, or do you want to actually do something you can look back on and go "holy shit that was cool!"?

Comment: Re:Unions (Score 1) 220

by Penguinisto (#46795669) Attached to: California Utility May Replace IT Workers with H-1B Workers

hey fuck-wad, it WORKED about 100 yrs ago...

This isn't 100 years ago - the companies have gotten smarter (and far more PR-savvy) since then.

Let me tell you how a certain progressive German company handled their union troubles here in the US...

They bought an oil-company spin-off called Shell Solar. In their Washington (state) site, the Machinists' Union decided that it would be a great time to ask for a raise, since things had been stagnant there for awhile wage-wise. The company said no. The Union threatened to strike, and it made a bit of noise in the local papers.. The company quickly agreed to the wage increases.

Not a handful of months later, the company decided to turn the WA production site into a warehouse, and gave the workers a choice: Either re-apply for jobs at lower wages in nearby right-to-work Oregon, or be out of a job. Two years later, the site was shuttered entirely.

So - still think unions are the way to go?

Comment: Re:Why do these people always have something to hi (Score 1) 348

by Penguinisto (#46795515) Attached to: VA Supreme Court: Michael Mann Needn't Turn Over All His Email

US v. Maxwell is a different story - it described a user/subscriber relationship with an ISP.

Otherwise as a general rule, corporations and similar entities (like publicly-funded universities) which provide email POP3 and IMAP service says far, far different:
http://www.nolo.com/legal-ency...
 

Comment: Re:Why do these people always have something to hi (Score 1) 348

by Penguinisto (#46795485) Attached to: VA Supreme Court: Michael Mann Needn't Turn Over All His Email

Not so. For example here is the privacy statement from a well-known university:

Privacy of Information
Information stored on a computer system or sent electronically over a network is the property of the individual who created it. Examination, collection, or dissemination of that information without authorization from the owner is a violation of the ownerâ(TM)s rights to control his or her own property. Systems administrators, however, may gain access to usersâ(TM) data or programs when it is necessary to maintain or prevent damage to systems or to ensure compliance with other University rules.

Which Uni is that? I understand that they cannot claim copyright, but legally the Uni can do whatever else it wants to with it.

Comment: Re:In Communist America (Score 1) 168

by Penguinisto (#46795415) Attached to: Peoria Mayor Sends Police To Track Down Twitter Parodist

If I write a scathing article about my local mayor, I won't get killed in a dark alley. I'm in Portland. Scathing articles about Sam Adams were a party trick for a little bit. Poor bastard.

As a fellow PDX resident, I can second that... hell, Adams even starred in a few Portlandia episodes in what has to be the coolest self-parodies ever (he was the Mayor's assistant).

I can't stand Adams' politics or ideology, but I damned sure admire the guy for being able to take a joke (and even to actively be a part of it.)

Comment: Re:Why do these people always have something to hi (Score 1) 348

by Penguinisto (#46795325) Attached to: VA Supreme Court: Michael Mann Needn't Turn Over All His Email

...unless either you or Mann (prolly not both) are lying, which is more than possible given that no one can actually use that data to reproduce the results he originally presented.

But the kicker is that you don't seem to understand that this is just a fishing expedition, to find something, *anything*, to take out of context and shit-coat Mann's career.

You mean like Mann did when he sued Tim Ball, then watched as the case collapsed because he wouldn't, you know, hand over the research documents that would prove Ball was somehow committing libel?

Oh, wait... ;)

Comment: Re:Why do these people always have something to hi (Score 1) 348

by Penguinisto (#46790779) Attached to: VA Supreme Court: Michael Mann Needn't Turn Over All His Email

People have an expectation of privacy in email.

In Europe, yes. In the US, not so much. Nearly every IT department has standard boilerplate that includes the fact that whatever you send in company/school email is company/school property, and can be searched and seized at any time for any legitimate reason.

Comment: Re:Why do these people always have something to hi (Score 2) 348

by Penguinisto (#46790757) Attached to: VA Supreme Court: Michael Mann Needn't Turn Over All His Email

Odd to see someone arguing on Slashdot in favor of publicly funded academic research being kept from the public.

Nobody is arguing for that. His private emails are not "publicly funded academic research".

...then perhaps he shouldn't use them for such a purpose? Odds are very near-perfect that he did use private email to at least promote his public research (via certain blog sites), and it is a valid and legitimate target for litigation discovery.

Comment: Re:Why do these people always have something to hi (Score 1) 348

by Penguinisto (#46790729) Attached to: VA Supreme Court: Michael Mann Needn't Turn Over All His Email

If your point is so proved and plain, why hide as AC?

Not the A/C, but this is why, on top of the point that you've utterly failed to disprove his point.

Do you want all your email and documents published to the public? If not, what do you have to hide?

Point of order: No one is asking Mann to lay out his entire life - just the portion of it that we the taxpayers paid for, and the portion that actual science (at least should) demand. ...got any other arguments?

Luck, that's when preparation and opportunity meet. -- P.E. Trudeau

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