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Comment: Re:Not worth answering (Score 1) 768

by NotBornYesterday (#43940817) Attached to: Seeking Fifth Amendment Defenders

The theory behind the Bill of Rights says that our rights exist whether or not the Bill of Rights says we do, or because it is convenient, or because it is logical to your mind. We have them because they are part of our nature as human beings, and the rights in the Bill of Rights confirm that there are certain aspects of our nature as people in which the government has no authority to intervene.

The ability to freely think, speak, associate with others, and move about, or the ability to worship as we please, or not worship at all, involve our sovereignty over our own minds and persons. The government cannot compel moon-landing doubters and conspiracy theorists to disavow their crackpot ideas. Not because the crackpots are necessarily right (sometimes paranoid bastards ARE right, after all), but because our government has no sovereign right to rule our minds. An earlier commenter related the 5th amendment protections as analogous to the 4th interms of search and seizure. I view the 5th amendment's right to not self-incriminate as more like an intersection of the 1st and 4th amendments, because it involves not just our things, but our thoughts. I see it as self-evident that our thoughts are more closely bound to our being, and more deserving of impenetrable legal protection than our effects.

At their root, "Rights" as the Constitution lays them out are an explicit restriction on governmental power. Not the other way around.

Biotech

+ - College student creates gel to stop bleeding, star healing->

Submitted by NotBornYesterday
NotBornYesterday (1093817) writes "A 20-year-old New York University student has invented a gel which, according to him, can stop heavy bleeding instantly. With the introduction of the latest invention by Joe Landolina,routine bandages could soon become a thing of the past. According to Landolina the Veti-Gel produced by him, can not only stop bleeding but also instantly start the healing process even on major wounds and wounds on internal organs and key arteries.

The gel, according to the report, is an artificial version of extracellular matrix, which is a substance present in the connective tissue which holds up an animal body together.

In a video with the article, the experimenter can be seen cutting a deep slice into the pork flesh while real pigs blood is being injected into the flesh at the same time. Soon after the flesh is cut, the blood starts flowing freely. However, as soon as the gel is applied on the cut and second liquid sprayed over it, the bleeding suddenly stops."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:So much for a fair trial. (Score 1) 1855

by NotBornYesterday (#36003164) Attached to: Osama Bin Laden Reported Dead, Body In US Hands

I mean, a guy arrested at the scene of a mass shooting, covered in blood and holding an assault rifle, screaming about how the aliens in his head told him to murder all of mankind... still gets a trial. Timothy McVeigh (the second biggest terrorist to attack US soil) got a trial. People who systematically abduct and rape hundreds of little girls and hide their bodies in barrels get a trial.

I'm certain the US would have loved to put him on trial. If he had wanted one, all he had to do was surrender. The loonies you mention, both hypothetical and real, seem to have been willing to be taken alive. Whether he really believed in his 72 virgins or not, he obviously preferred death to arrest.

Comment: Re:If I wanted consequences (Score 1) 352

by NotBornYesterday (#34864012) Attached to: Balancing Choice With Irreversible Consequences In Games
I'll second the Fallout bit. The hardcore mode in New Vegas forces you to eat, drink, and sleep every so often. Also, rest and medicine don't instantly and automagically heal you and regrow lost limbs. That said, the save/reload/undo option the author of TFA philosophizes about still exists, and the automagic recovery and regrowth still happens with ludicrous speed and ease compared to the real world, etc., but I then again, didn't get it so my kids could learn a life lesson from it.

Comment: Re:Yay! (Score 1) 440

by NotBornYesterday (#34525740) Attached to: Navy Tests Mach 8 Electromagnetic Railgun

The recent leak of diplomatic cables offers more evidence that the USA does not seem to respect it's allies. Like what? You really think France or Germany would attack the USA? Not in 1000 years. Most of Europe is not the military, war-waging type. I have a hard time imagining how the USA can justify spying on these countries and their officials. If even the closest allies of the USA are treated with so little trust and respect, then I'm not certain any country can fully trust the USA.

Do you really think that other countries are not doing the same to the US and everyone else? Of course they are. Their cables just haven't been leaked yet.

As far as Europe being all peaceful, present-day Europe has been mostly peaceful, except for some regional wars in the Balkans recently. But prior to the cold war, Europe was nothing but wars going back to the Roman empire and beyond. Even during the cold war, NATO was predicated on the assumption that Europe would again be a battleground, and would need defense. Current events make Europe look peaceful. History, not so much.

Technological superiority, be it military or otherwise, is a race held on a treadmill. Standing still isn't an option. Railguns might buy us 5, 10, 20, maybe 30 years until someone else invents their own (or steals ours), much like stealth fighters, which are now in various stages of making their way into the arsenals of potential opponents around the world.

Comment: Re:Simple, same as (Score 1) 361

by NotBornYesterday (#34518296) Attached to: Stuxnet Still Out of Control At Iran Nuclear Sites
Some perspective is needed here. Note that I said "perspective", not "denial and defense". The Japanese internment camps did not feature Zyklon B and gas ovens. What happened wasn't right by a long shot, but it isn't even in the same league as the Nazi purges. "All men are created equal" didn't have the same meaning then as it does now, because at the time it was intended as a rejection of the presumption that nobility were inherently superior to commoners, not a declaration of universal suffrage. It's true that in order to have the right to vote one had to be a land-owning white man, but generally, Constitutional protections covered all non-slaves.

"Biggest cunt in a suit" comes dangerously close to invoking a mandatory Rule 34 google search.

"Ignorance is the soil in which belief in miracles grows." -- Robert G. Ingersoll

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