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Submission Summary: 0 pending, 13 declined, 1 accepted (14 total, 7.14% accepted)

Submission + - "The Thing" now based on a true-ish story

Macgrrl writes: Not content with trying to resurrect mammoths and plants, scientists have revived a giant virus from the Siberian permafrost.

The virus is not considered a threat to humans, as giant viruses typically attack amoebae, but it has raised the question of what other viruses may exist in the ice waiting to be released.

Suddenly "The Thing" is a much more frightening possibility. #whatcouldpossiblygowrong

Submission + - Ask Slashdot - would you really want to live to 15 ( 3

Macgrrl writes: It was reported today in The Age newspaper that scientists believe that they will have a drug within the next 5-10 years that will extend the average human lifespan to 150 years.

Given the retirement age in Australia is 65, that would give you an extra 95 years past the current reitrment age, meaning you would probably have to extend the average working life to 100 or 120 years to prevent the economy becoming totally unbalanced and pensions running out.

That assumes that the life extension is all 'good years', and not a prolonged period of dementia and physical decline.

Would you want to live to 150? What do you see as being the most likely issues and what do you think you would do with all the extra years?


Submission + - Adobe folds on Flash, embraces HTML5 1

Macgrrl writes: Reported in The Age newspaper today, Kevin Lynch, Adobe Chief Technology Officer, has announced that Adobe will be endorsing Apple's preferred HTML5 video format.

While Adobe will continue to work on Flash, they look forward to embracing the exiciting new possibilities offered by HTML5 and consequently the gateway onto the iPhone/iPad ecosystem.
The Media

Submission + - Technology is the new black?

Macgrrl writes: As reported in The Age newspaper, Conde Nast publishers, whose titles include Vanity Fair and Vogue Magazine has purchased the Ars Technica website for an undisclosed amount.

They intend to combine it with which they acquired in 2006, Ars Technica will continue to operate as an independant unit under editor Ken Fisher.

Submission + - Police predict robotic crimewave

Macgrrl writes: As reported in The Age newspaper today; "Technology such as cloned part-robot humans used by organised crime gangs pose the greatest future challenge to police, along with online scamming, Australian Federal Police (AFP) Commissioner Mick Keelty says."

No, really! This is not an late April fools gag... They are really worried about Cyborg criminals. Which makes me wonder just a little bit about what other police initiatives the Australian public is funding.

He's like a function -- he returns a value, in the form of his opinion. It's up to you to cast it into a void or not. -- Phil Lapsley