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Comment: Re:Avoid IoT at all costs (Score 1) 106

by rthille (#47773757) Attached to: Securing Networks In the Internet of Things Era

If you need the key embedded in the chip in your fridge, and the engineers weren't complete idiots and they aren't all the same, then downloading a script may not be enough, you may have to hook up a sensitive a/d converter and run 1000s of probes to determine the key. The potential pool of people who would do such a thing to avoid ads on their fridge is much smaller than those who would simply cover the screen with their kid's art.

Comment: Re:Worldwide reach (Score 1) 233

by Huge_UID (#47759309) Attached to: California Passes Law Mandating Smartphone Kill Switch
Yes. For details see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_emission_standards#Motor_vehicles

Due to its preexisting standards and particularly severe motor vehicle air pollution problems in the Los Angeles metropolitan area, the U.S. state of California has special dispensation from the federal government to promulgate its own automobile emissions standards. Other states may choose to follow either the national standard or the stricter California standards. States adopting the California standards include Arizona (2012 model year),[1] Connecticut, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New Mexico (2011 model year), New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington, as well as the District of Columbia.[2][3] Such states are frequently referred to as "CARB states" in automotive discussions because the regulations are defined by the California Air Resources Board. The EPA has adopted the California emissions standards as a national standard by the 2016 model year[4] and is collaborating with California regulators on stricter national emissions standards for model years 2017â"2025.[5]

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