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Comment: Re: How about human dignity? (Score 1) 187

by Beliskner (#49193945) Attached to: Facebook Puts Users On Suicide Watch
Sir, As an old timer slash dotter I commend you for keeping it together, the economy is improving, with luck The probability of you finding jobs increases. Or if you so choose you can come to the UK here we have no shame of government intervention and have an excellent disability benefits system including mental damage and even for just plain unemployment

Comment: No-one can (Score 1) 46

by SuperKendall (#49193813) Attached to: EU Free Data Roaming, Net Neutrality Plans In Jeopardy

Can you provide a link to those 300 pages proving that we're "going to pay and pay"?

No, just like you can't prove that's not the case - because NONE of that is public.

All you can do is react to past experience when hundreds of pages of regulations are about to affect something that was working quite well.

And I doubt those 300 pages are all about net neutrality

Good luck with blind faith in large organizations that do not care about anything but growing themselves. I'm sure it will end well for you.

Net neutrality is a simple concept.

It is, isn't it...

Now you are starting to catch on.

Comment: Re: Politics aside for a moment. (Score 1) 535

This seems to be a complaint about the convenience of quickly collecting and/or processing, not necessarily about "breaking the rules". You seem to be mixing up multiple concerns here.

If she CC'd her messages "properly", it appears she can satisfy the rule as written, even if such would make life difficult for investigators. The rule said nothing about making data easy to collect.

Nobody has produced clear evidence so far that she failed to CC properly. I suspect there may have been times that she forgot every now and then, but that may not be enough to bust her on. They'd probably have to show malicious intent.

Comment: Oh Come On, it's a Press Release (Score 4, Insightful) 73

OK, no real technical data and some absurd claims here.

First all-digital transceiver? No. There have been others. Especially if you allow them to have a DAC and an ADC and no other components in the analog domain, but even without that, there are lots of IoT-class radios with direct-to-digital detectors and digital outputs directly to the antenna. You might have one in your car remote (mine is two-way).

And they have to use patented algorithms? Everybody else can get along with well-known technology old enough that any applicable patents are long expired.

It would be nicer if there was some information about what they are actually doing. If they really have patented it, there's no reason to hold back.

Comment: Re:Yes. What do you lose? But talk to lawyer first (Score 4, Insightful) 538

by hey! (#49193289) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Should I Let My Kids Become American Citizens?

Personally, I don't see that any of these things as compelling practical advantages, given that the kids already have dual Swedish and Belgian (and therefore EU) citizenship. If they were Moldovan and South Sudanese, that'd be a different story. Or if they were citizens of a country from which getting a visa to enter the US might be difficult in the future.

But most importantly I think this is one of those decisions that you just don't make primarily on a cost-benefit basis. It's not like deciding to join Costco or subscribe to Hulu. Citizenship entails responsibilities. If you want your kids to shoulder those responsibilities and feel allegiance to the US then it makes sense to get them that citizenship come hell or high water. But given that they already have two perfectly good citizenships from two advanced western democracies with generally positive international relations worldwide, I don't see much practical advantage in adding a third.

Still, I wouldn't presume to give advice, other than this. The poster needs to examine, very carefully, that feeling he has that maybe his kids should be Americans. The way he expresses it, "sentimental reasons", makes those feelings seem pretty trivial, in which case it hardly matters if they don't become Americans. After all, most other Belgians seem to get along perfectly well without being Americans too. But if this is at all something he suspects he might seriously regret not doing, or if it nags him in ways he can't quite put his finger on, he needs to get to the bottom of that in a way random people on the Internet can't help him with.

Comment: Re:Yes. What do you lose? But talk to lawyer first (Score 5, Interesting) 538

by FreeUser (#49192407) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Should I Let My Kids Become American Citizens?

Yes. They don't lose anything by becoming citizens (there are tax issues but they are pretty minor), and being a US citizen has a lot of advantages, like the support of US consulate services.

I'm a dual citizen (born American, obtained British citizenship while I lived there), and while my default position would be "you should grant them US citizenship as that opens up more options to them if they ever want to live in the US" (and despite the many issues, there are still good reasons to want to live here for many people), it should be said that the tax bullshit really is onerous, and renunciation would be expensive. It is like the US congress has built a financial Berlin wall around the country ... sure, you're free to leave, if you can pay up (and pay for expensive tax preparers who specialize in filing US taxes for expats, as the forms are by no means easy), but good luck ever getting out from under our thumb.

It's not an easy question to answer, and as someone else suggested, I would involve your 16 or 17-year old child in the decision beforehand, with good financial and legal advice on the implications pro and con. Weighing the option of living here vs. the never-ending IRS headaches of living abroad--that's a tough one.

Comment: Your friendly neighborhood word pedant here (Score 0) 139

by hey! (#49191827) Attached to: Developers Race To Develop VR Headsets That Won't Make Users Nauseous

... with some food for thought.

The ending '-eous' or '-ious' is added to a noun to produce an adjective that means producing whatever that noun is. Something that is 'advantageous' produces advantage for example. Something which is ignominious produce ignominy (shame, embarrassment). Something that is piteous arouses pity in the onlooker.

I think you see where I'm going with this. The word the headline writer should have used is 'nauseated', although making users nauseous in the pedantic sense would certainly be a concern for the developers of any product.

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