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Comment Re:Difference between this and SpaceX (Score 1) 101

On an orbital class rocket your engine will have too much thrust making it impossible to hover. That is what SpaceX is trying to do. Land using a thrust to weight greater than one.

Speaking from a position of complete ignorance here -- is there no way to reduce the thrust of the rocket to the preferred rate?

Comment Re:Awwww thats so cute (Score 1) 269

I actually still have one of the BT/yahoo email accounts I mentioned in my GP post (even though BT haven't been my ISP for a decade now, I pay a small fee to keep the email account because of the faff associated with changing all the accounts linked to it). I can confirm that it does indeed have advertising if you aren't running an adblocker, though for the time being at least, it raises no objections to me using Adblock Plus when I log in.

There was a fair old bit of fuss some years back, when BT migrated its users from the bespoke email service it had been providing onto the reskinned Yahoo accounts. Unfortunately, as is so often the case, BT and Yahoo just decided to tolerate that "bit of fuss" and carried on regardless.

Comment Re:Questions... (Score 1) 133

It's not greed, just survival. For some unknown reason antibiotics have a synergistic growth effect on animals that are not sick so antibiotics are feed to healthy animals. In the real world most businesses are barely profitable so any action that can increase profits is used to avoid bankruptcy.

Horses**t. The first farmers who did this did it because of greed, trying to make a bigger profit. Later farmers might have felt that it was the only way to survive, but only because the first farmers did what they did.

If your business isn't making a profit, you raise prices until it does. If you can't do that, it means either that you're doing something inefficiently or that somebody else is cutting corners. If it is the former, you need to fix the inefficiency. If it is the latter, you need to clearly differentiate your products from those others in the marketplace so that your customers know why your products cost more. Either way, cutting the same corners that everybody else does invariably results in a race to the bottom, not just in terms of cost, but also in terms of profit margins and quality. Once your business goes down that path, you might as well close the business and give the money back to the shareholders, because it is a hopeless cause, and your business is no longer contributing anything of value to the world as a whole that could not be contributed just as easily (and more efficiently) by your competitors in your absence.

Comment Re:Awwww thats so cute (Score 4, Informative) 269

Yahoo provides email services for quite a number of big ISPs. Certainly, the email services for BT (which is still, I think, the UK's largest ISP) are provided by Yahoo and just given a light BT-specific reskinning.

So there might be quite a lot more people out there using Yahoo mail accounts than you would suspect. Some of them probably don't realise it themselves.

Submission + - Judge wipes out Safe Harbor provision in DMCA, makes Cox accomplice of piracy

SysKoll writes: The DMCA is well-known for giving exorbitant powers to copyright holders, such as taking down a page or a whole web site without a court order. Media companies buy services from vendors like Rightscorp, a shake-down outfit that issues thousands of robot-generated take-down notices and issues threats against ISPs and sites ignoring them.

Cox, like a lot of ISP, is inundated with abusive take-down notices, in particular from Rightscorp. Now, BMG Rights Management and Round Hill Music are suing Cox for refusing to shut off the Internet access of subscribers that Rightscorp accused of downloading music via BitTorrent. Cox argues that as an ISP, they benefit from the Safe Harbor provision that shields access providers from subscribers' misbehavior.

Not so, says US District Judge Liam O'Grady. The judge sided with the media companies ahead of trial, saying Cox should have terminated the repeat offenders accused by Rightscorp. Cox's response is quite entertaining for a legal document: its description of Rightscorp includes the term "shady", "shake-down", and "pay no attention to the facts"

O'Grady also derided the Electronic Frontier Foundations's attempt to file an amicus brief supporting Cox, calling them hysterical crybabies.

This case will be closely watched and can be very damaging for the Internet industry.

Submission + - Disney IT workers prepare to sue over foreign replacements (

JustAnotherOldGuy writes: At least 23 former Disney IT workers have filed complaints with the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) over the loss of their jobs to foreign replacements. This federal filing is a first step to filing a lawsuit alleging discrimination. These employees are arguing that they are victims of national origin discrimination, a complaint increasingly raised by U.S. workers who have lost their jobs to foreign workers on H-1B and other temporary visas. Disney's layoff last January followed agreements with IT services contractors that use foreign labor, mostly from India. Some former Disney workers have begun to go public over the displacement process

"You can't get very far in this world without your dossier being there first." -- Arthur Miller