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Comment Re:RAM is not cheap (Score 1) 21

Yeah, DDR3 prices hit rock bottom right before Christmas 2013. I was considering upgrading to 32GB just because it was so cheap, but really I had nothing maxing out 16GB. Still don't really, even now running a ton of crap I'm only using 8-9GB and the rest is cache. For prosumer money ($1000) you can even get 8x16GB DDR4 for an X99 motherboard, prices have bottomed out but so has demand for most people too. Faster CPU, GPU, SSD and so on great.... more memory? Meh. I suppose it could be cheaper, but at least on the PC it's not much of the total anyway. It's usually the tablet and laptop producers charging an arm and a leg for RAM upgrades.

Comment Re:It could work. (Score 1) 463

It's not a theory, it's the truth.

In fact the mkLinux you mention was originally a port done by two guys named Mark and Karl, hence "mk".

Steve Jobs saw Slackware on a CD and, being that he wanted to see the floppy disk die, he chose that distro to port as Mac OSX. Most other distros at that point were still on floppy disk. Woz and Seymour Cray were drinking buddies so when they needed some high performance multi-threading support from Cray's UNICOS system, Woz tapped his pal and got access to the necessary code for a handshake rather than the usual multi-million dollar licensing fees.

The whole "NeXTSTEP" thing was to fool investors into thinking they had a solid product, not something they hacked out over a few weeks. In fact if you do any development on Mac OSX or iOS, you will see "ns_____" things called all the time. The "ns" does not mean "NextStep" as many people think. It means "Nice Seymour" as a tip of the hat to the man that made all that code available for free.

I remember all this like it was yesterday.

Comment Re:It could work. (Score 1) 463

Nope. OSX is a fork/mix of early Slackware Linux with some earlier Cray UNICOS multi-threading library support.

NeXTSTEP is based on AT&T SysV UNIX with graphical libraries borrowed from Ashton-Tate's (ahead of its time) Framework suite. If memory serves I think they also uses some of CP/M's successor MP/M 86 for some sweet multiuser stuff.

I remember it all like it was yesterday!

Comment Why do they need ANY info? (Score 1, Insightful) 247

Ok, why do they even need to know if the car is in MOTION at all just to play music??

All of my car stereos so far, have never had to have any connection to car info to play my songs as I barrel down the road. On custom installs, I've never hooked to any of the car data, etc.

Why would an entertainment system need to know any of that information at all?

Comment Re: They demanded my ID and power bill (Score 1) 216

I know many people who are not known by the name printed in their passport.

Wow, I don't actually know many people that HAVE a passport?!?!?

I know more folks in Europe have them, but most Americans do not own a passport.

I've never been on Facebook, but are they really asking for identification documents like this JUST to have an account on FB?? If so, wow....another good reason to NOT be on Facebook...

Comment Re:Benefit to end users? (Score 1) 463

The question is also how much has he tired from politics in general or the LKML in particular. Because whenever you are building something together with other people, you'll have disagreements on how it's supposed to be built and how it's supposed to work. One of the freedoms of open source is copying the code and going home, saying I'm build my own kernel. By myself. Exactly how I want it to be. And I don't have to discuss or argue or respect any majority opinion or prove why it's a good idea or anything. And when I'm done people can use it or not use it, I don't have to market it or make a business case for it.

So he wants to ditch the politics and just write the code, good for him and it could even result in some nice features if somebody else goes up to bat for it on the LKML or one of the other places opinions clash. But there's always going to be a place like the LKML, there's always going to be disagreements there and in any sufficiently large group of people there will be jerks and drama queens. The question is if the LKML is a particularly bad case or if you could actually create something better. Maybe it's just my experience, but often when you try you end up attracting all the malcontents of the current incarnation and the new place is actually worse since they all expect this to be the place they get their way.

Comment It could work. (Score 3, Funny) 463

Remember that forks sometimes do succeed.

Take Linux. It forked from OpenBSD which itself was forked from QNX with smatterings of FreeBSD code.

QNX programmed itself from vacuum tubes and trace wires left on the ground at Quantum Software in Ottawa one evening. Dan Hildebrand (RIP) apparently had something to do with this metamorphosis.

Meanwhile across the ocean, FreeBSD was forked from Windows 95 which itself came from the unholy union of MS-DOS and the GEM environment. MS-DOS was bought from a company in Washington State and was a fork of CP/M. GEM was a stand alone thing and should never have been born.

Where was I? Oh yeah, CP/M. CP/M was a copy of Apple's SOS used in the Apple /// series of super-powerful business computers. The source code was left at an airport where Gary Kildall read it when his plane was on auto-pilot.

Apple SOS was a mix/fork of Apple ProDOS and TRS-80's OS; I forget the name, not important. Radio Shack forked their TRS-80 OS from some source code they saw in Lions' Commentary on UNIX 6th Edition.


Comment Not really (Score 5, Informative) 463

Branching happens all the time, either to develop a feature or because it's doing something that upstream won't accept. One man maintaining his own patches isn't a fork. A fork would imply that that you're planning to diverge from or replace the project you branched from, nothing in his post indicates he wants to compete with Linux or the LKML. He's just saying I'll make my own patches and provide them for those who want them, but I'm not going to bother trying to upstream them. Kinda like Debian and Ubuntu, Canonical made a lot of patches for Debian but they weren't trying to fork it. They just rebased off it every six months, being a downstream variation. He's making a downstream variation with some interface from BSD. Big whoop.

Comment Re:Pseudonyms have a cost to social networks (Score 1) 216

What a load of corporatist bullshit.

>alias users are misfits or troublemakers

No. Fucking NO.

You have the right to call yourself whatever you want in real life so long as you are not trying to defraud anyone while doing this. That this right supposedly suddenly doesn't exist because a corporation demands it is insane.

This does not make you a misfit. It does not make you a troublemaker.

Aliases have a history going back decades online and thousands of years offline. This sudden "hurr, you must use your real name" in a contract-of-adhesion is such bullshit.

You may believe that corporations have special rights to deny you your rights, but I don't, and neither do a lot of other sane individuals.

If Facebook's share price loses a few pennies because people like me use aliases, it's not my problem. They can find another business model.


"I'm not afraid of dying, I just don't want to be there when it happens." -- Woody Allen