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Comment: In a word: No (Score 1) 1

by Dngrsone (#43164025) Attached to: Could Modern Missiles Make Surface Navies Obsolete?
The aircraft carrier killed the battleship. Having a surface-to-surface missile that can reach out to the carrier is nothing new-- the Chinese have had Silkworms for decades. Extended range will only accomplish so much in the way of owning an arena. Until wars are fought using only robots, drones and satelites, then there will continue to be a need to have people in the arena, and therefore there will be a need for surface ships of various design.
Debian

+ - Distributed File System for Debian-based Road Warriors?

Submitted by hweimer
hweimer (709734) writes "I manage a small network which includes some clients that are regularly deployed in locations where there is no or only poor internet access. Currently, local copies of data for these clients are created and merged back more or less manually, which naturally creates all sorts of problems. So I'm looking now for a distributed file system so that each client has always access to a local copy, which is automatically re-synced once it comes back online. Storage space is not critical, nor is obscene read/write performance. An additional requirement is that it has to be included in Debian, at least in the upcoming "wheezy" release. Any recommendations?"
Games

+ - Is It Time To Adopt Gamers' Bill of Rights 2

Submitted by adeelarshad82
adeelarshad82 (1482093) writes "The SimCity launch debacle is only the latest in an increasingly frustrating string of affronts to gamers' rights as customers. Before SimCity, we had Ubisoft's always-on DRM (that the company only ended quietly after massive outcry from gamers). We had the forced online and similarly unplayable launch of Diablo III. We had games like Asura's Wrath and Final Fantasy: All the Bravest that required you to pay more money just to complete them after you purchase them. And let us never forget the utter infamy of StarForce, SecuROM, and Sony's copy protection, which installed rootkits on computers without users' knowledge. As one recently published article argues, maybe its time for gamers' Bill of Rights."

+ - Got a Cell Phone Booster? Well FCC says you have to turn it off->

Submitted by Dngrsone
Dngrsone (2820801) writes "Some two million people have bought cell-phone wireless signal boosters and have been using them to get better communication between their phones and distant cell towers. But now, the FCC says they all have to turn their boosters off and ask permission from their providers and register their devices with those providers before they can turn them back on. FCC FAQ: http://wireless.fcc.gov/signal-boosters/faq.html"
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Comment: Okay, but advantages does ext4 have on VFAT ? (Score 0) 1

by Dngrsone (#42956019) Attached to: Why doesn't Android support Linux filesystems for removable storage?
Yes, it seems a bit backward for Android to ignore the ext4 format, considering the roots of their operating system, but what advantages would ext4 have over VFAT when it comes to externally mounted SD cards? Because of the finite write limits of Flash memory, journaling is a bad idea and will never be supported. What about overhead? Is there an advantage in overhead for the ext4 system vs ext2 or VFAT? There are legitimate reasons to have ext4 as a file system manager on a computer. These include having the ability to use larger, more complex file names, journaling, greater capacity storage media and hugely nested directory tree structures. None of these advantages can be reasonably translated onto a (relatively) small storage medium such as an SD card, which suffers, by its nature, a limited life span (finite writes). Yes, you could use ext4 on an SD card, if you hack it right; you have proven that. However, there seems to be no rpactical reason why Android should support ext4 on SD cards.
Your Rights Online

+ - Whitehouse.gov petition to make cell phone unlocking legal needs 15K petitions->

Submitted by namalc
namalc (66960) writes "Recently the Librarian of Congress declared cell phone locking to be illegal for phones sold after Jan 26. Now, a whitehouse.gov petition https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/make-unlocking-cell-phones-legal is coming close to the number of signatures needed to get a formal response from the Whitehouse."
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Android

+ - Why doesn't Android support Linux filesystems for removable storage? 1

Submitted by Pale Dot
Pale Dot (2813911) writes "After weeks of struggle I finally figured out a way for the apps on my rooted Android tablet to recognize an SD card I had formatted as Ext4 but with the default journaling option turned off. The problem at first was getting the SD card to mount at all (technically this was the "external" SD card as the tablet also has a built-in "internal" SD card). Apparently, the Android automount facility, the evil-sounding vold daemon, does not support any filesystem besides Microsoft's VFAT. From various online sources, I learned that the CyanogenMod Linux 3.x kernel itself does support mounting Ext4, at least via the terminal "mount -t ext4" command.

A second problem soon cropped up. Apps, such as VLC and the AardDict offline dictionary, that rely on some sort of automagic scanning of the device storage space would not index the media and database files I copied to the SD card. It turns out that the simple solution, or the "hack" as it stands, is to mount the SD card under the directory created for the internal VFAT-formatted SD card, i.e. as "/storage/sdcard0/extsd" rather than the more direct "/storage/sdcard1". This works probably because subdirectories inherit the file permissions of the parent.

As part of my Google (re)search into the problem, I came upon this Google+ post by an Android developer curiously named Dianne Hackborn about the design decision not to support anything besides the Redmond-certified filesystem: "The external storage when on a SD card is FAT. Period. You are just going to cause yourself a mess if you try to do otherwise. The basic semantics of how external storage is used relies on it being fat — no permissions, case insensitive, etc."

So, is Google right about not supporting Ext2/3/4 for removable flash media, even if the base system itself often uses one of these Linux-native filesystems? Supposed issues about the frequent media access needed by a journalised filesystem don't apply to Ext2, which has no journal, or Ext4, which has an "-O ^has_journal" (no journal) formatting option. Perplexing still is that my tablet is advertised as having support for yet another Microsoft-patented invention, the ExFat filesystem. Unfortunately, there's still no way for a non-rooted Android tablet or smartphone to mount an SD card formatted as Ext2 or Ext4."
Patents

+ - Amazon patents the milkman->

Submitted by
walterbyrd
walterbyrd writes "Amazon.com this week won a broad patent on technology that lets customers schedule product deliveries to their doorsteps or mailboxes on a recurring basis, without needing to submit a new order every time. The patent filing says this approach will be particularly useful to overcome “the challenges presented by the delivery of perishable goods or other consumables.”"
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Internet Explorer

+ - IE patch to fix 57 vulnerabilities-> 1

Submitted by Billly Gates
Billly Gates (198444) writes "Microsoft is advising users to stick with other browsers until Tuesday when 57 patches for Internet Explorer 6,7,8,9, and even 10.. There is no word if this patch is to protect IE from the +50 java exploits that were patched last week or the new Adobe flash vulnerabilities that were just posted earlier today. Microsoft has more information here. In semi related news IE 10 is almost done for Windows 7 and has a IE10blocker available for the corporations. No word on whether IE 10 will be included as part of the 57 updates."
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Government

+ - Copyright claim thwarts North Korea-> 1

Submitted by ianare
ianare (1132971) writes "A propaganda video from the North Korean authorities has been removed from YouTube following a copyright claim by games maker Activision. It shows a space craft flying around the world and eventually over a city resembling New York. The buildings are then seen crumbling amid fires and missile attacks. However, the dramatic images were soon recognised as having been lifted from Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3. By Tuesday, the video had been blocked, with a message notifying users of Activision's complaint shown in its place."
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