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Comment Re:Bad practice. (Score 4, Interesting) 242

Any device that can perform different actions based on different finger prints?

And how many is that? Somehow I don't imagine Apple building such an explicitly anti-law enforcement feature. Maybe with a sufficiently jail broken device you could rig something.

Any multi-user OS which supports a finger print reader for log-in is an easy candidate to do this yourself. You have your normal account, one or two for the kids and your spouse and one for your dog fluffy... one of which you have bound to your panic finger, which when logged into for the second time (the first being when you configure it) it executes a script or three which clears the TPM, overwrites a few key sectors of the HD and then reboots.

Comment Re:Bad practice. (Score 5, Interesting) 242

You can't, but interesting things may be able to happen if you fail to disclose which finger will unlock the device.

Maybe your right ring finger is what you use to login, but not having specific knowledge of which finger you actually use they have you try your thumb pointer finger... not knowing that your device treats that as a panic button and not only wipes out memory of the old finger print, but also remaining hope of them unlocking the device with or without your help.

Comment Re:Anyone got Ubuntu Touch running on one yet? (Score 3, Informative) 152

Only the devices running Windows RT had secure boot forcibly enabled, the rest are just regular PCs with BIOS or UEFI options to disable such things... something I have done before on my SP3, something those evil folks at Microsoft even point out on their own website:

Comment Re:"Gun industry does" (Score 1) 223

I suspect the argument is also that a firearm tends to have a (labor intensive to search) paper trail well beyond when it leaves the factory, doubly so when some cities/states require registration (either regardless of where purchased or when purchased from an FFL).

The problem though is the same: So long as a legal market exists for transfers that do not involve/require additional registration, you will have quite a few guns/drones, and even when those legal markets do not exist or are not practiced (ie Chicago), you still have a large number of unregistered guns.

Comment Re:License Plates and registrations ... (Score 2) 223

if im spending 200 bucks on a toy, I shouldnt need to jump through hoops.

The BATFE (amongst others) would disagree.

You can find low quality suppressors (or just adapters for a oil can) for about that price... then you get to pay an additional $200 tax to them and wait 9 months for them to process your transfer paperwork. Only after you receive the tax stamp back can you take possession of what you've technically owned all of that time.

Comment Re:No free education for illegal aliens? (Score 1) 191

Citizenship has little to do with it since Plyler v. Doe, and I would imagine that ones legality in the country would not come into play with regards to qualifying for such a program while serving a sentence in prison... however the illegal alien may find themselves deported along with their degree after completion, while the citizen would be forced to go look for work with their degree and a local criminal record.

Comment Re: Good for them (Score 2) 191

You beat me to it.

Apparently the OP either works for a small company that honestly doesn't care, or didn't read everything they were signing/agreeing to when accepting the job.

Fun fact: These background checks often aren't just a check to see IF you've been convicted of criminal wrongdoing, but to make sure you own up to them.

I knew a guy who was offered a job at a rather large SW house, underwent the background check and because he failed to pre-emptily disclose a thing or to they found (nothing overly serious IIRC) they pulled the offer. Had the acknowledged the previous convictions up front there would not have been a problem.

Diplomacy is the art of saying "nice doggy" until you can find a rock.