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+ - NASA emails a Socket Wrench to the ISS

Submitted by HughPickens.com
HughPickens.com (3830033) writes "Sarah LeTrent reports at CNN that NASA just emailed the design of a socket wrench to astronauts so that they could print it out in the orbit. The ratcheting socket wrench was the first "uplink tool" printed in space, according to Grant Lowery, marketing and communications manager for Made In Space, which built the printer in partnership with NASA. The tool was designed on the ground, emailed to the space station and then manufactured where it took four hours to print out the finished product. The space agency hopes to one day use the technology to make parts for broken equipment in space and long-term missions would benefit greatly from onboard manufacturing capabilities. "I remember when the tip broke off a tool during a mission," recalls NASA astronaut TJ Creamer, who flew aboard the space station during Expedition 22/23 from December 2009 to June 2010. "I had to wait for the next shuttle to come up to bring me a new one. Now, rather than wait for a resupply ship to bring me a new tool, in the future, I could just print it.""

+ - Seattle Police Held Hackathon To Redact Footage From Body Cameras-> 1

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Hackathons are common these days, but you don't often hear about events hosted by police departments. That's what the Seattle Police Department did on Friday, with the solitary goal of finding a good way to redact the video streams taken by police body cameras and dash cameras. "bout one-third were technology professionals or part-timers like Henry Kroll, who makes a living as a salmon fisherman but focuses on video and other technology issues in his spare time. The remainder were Seattle police and other public officials, a few members of the community, and a number of people from local companies such as Amazon Web Services and Evidence.com, plus a substantial media presence from local television stations and newspapers." Seven different teams demonstrated solutions, but none thought automation could realistically handle the task in the near future. "bout one-third were technology professionals or part-timers like Henry Kroll, who makes a living as a salmon fisherman but focuses on video and other technology issues in his spare time. The remainder were Seattle police and other public officials, a few members of the community, and a number of people from local companies such as Amazon Web Services and Evidence.com, plus a substantial media presence from local television stations and newspapers." The city just started a pilot program for body-worn police cameras."
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Comment: Re: Study financed by (Score 4, Informative) 171

by BarbaraHudson (#48644513) Attached to: Study: Red Light Cameras Don't Improve Safety
Nope - that's what the city argued, and lost. The judge tossed the tickets.

RIVER NORTH — Some of Chicago's yellow lights are too short, according to an administrative law judge who said he's thrown out "60 to 70 percent" of red-light camera tickets he's come across recently because of the discrepancy.

The city uses the state and federal standard of having yellow lights display for a minimum of three seconds at intersections. But an administrative law judge, who hears appeals from motorists ticketed by red-light cameras, said during a hearing this week that he has seen evidence that yellow times are slightly beneath that at some Chicago intersections with red-light cameras.

Over the objections of the city, Fagel was allowed to present his video evidence on two of the red-light tickets that he said showed yellow light times slightly under three seconds.

Judge Robert Sussman dismissed the two red-light camera tickets and then surprised the hearing room by saying the Department of Administrative Hearings was seeing a large volume of red-light camera violations that listed a yellow light time of under three seconds.

"We're having a big problem with these yellow lights," Sussman said. "Sixty to 70 percent are coming up under three seconds."

Sussman said he has routinely thrown out any ticket for which documentation shows the yellow light lasted less than three full seconds. And he said he will continue to do so until the timing is fixed.

Comment: Re:Study financed by (Score 1) 171

by BarbaraHudson (#48644485) Attached to: Study: Red Light Cameras Don't Improve Safety

The practice of too-quick yellow lights was SOP for red-light cameras for years, because otherwise they would have failed to generate enough revenue to justify themselves.

None of this is new, it's been covered in the main-stream media before, Florida tried to do this state-wide and got caught a year and a half ago. Here's the map identifying the traps.

Comment: Re:we can't find talented workers (Score 0) 213

by BarbaraHudson (#48644307) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Is an Open Source<nobr> <wbr></nobr>.NET Up To the Job?

I work at a funded startup in the Seattle area and we've had several .NET (C#) developer positions open for several months now. We rarely even get applicants and the ones we get rarely pass a basic phone screen.

No way would we discriminate on age. The talent pool from what we've seen is crap.

Could it be that the toolchain you use attracts more than its' share of mediocre talent?

Comment: Re:Why bother? (Score 2) 213

by BarbaraHudson (#48644293) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Is an Open Source<nobr> <wbr></nobr>.NET Up To the Job?

Are you saying that software development languages in their current state are perfect and there is no reason to learn anything new or different? If so, in the not too distant future I predict you'll be walking out of your job with your personal items in a cardboard box.

That's not what I wrote. I wrote that there's no real reason for projects and programmers who are already implementing solutions using other toolchains to make the switch. Why re-code the wheel? If, for example, you coded your project in Java (which has been open-sourced for years and runs on multiple platforms), why would you switch to .NET and obsolete all your current code that's (hopefully) already been written and debugged?

Comment: Re:Why bother? (Score 5, Insightful) 213

by BarbaraHudson (#48644265) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Is an Open Source<nobr> <wbr></nobr>.NET Up To the Job?

I think you missed my point, so please allow me to elaborate. For someone who wants to go from Windows to other platforms, an open-source .NET makes sense, but only if their code is already in .NET.

For people who are already using toolchains other than .NET that support their products on multiple platforms, there's no reason to switch. It's just "re-implementing the wheel" with another language.

And since the official Java implementation is open source (OpenJDK) and has been for years, why not just stick with it if you're already using it? So really, the majority of people who aren't already using .NET have no real reason to switch.

Comment: Re:Old (Score 1) 438

by BarbaraHudson (#48644133) Attached to: What Happens To Society When Robots Replace Workers?

Henry Ford warned us about this. He was criticized by everyone else for paying his workers more than the competition. "I've got to pay them more so they can buy my cars." He used technology to make that possible.

At some point in the future, even if people are willing to work in almost slavery conditions for peanuts, there simply won't be enough jobs to go around (especially since those "grunt" jobs are in many cases the first to be automated). And people won't have money to buy the products.

A future where everything is free is all nice and good, but "you can't get there from here." At least not without some serious, possibly fatal, pain.

Hold on to the root.

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