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Comment: Re:The directive does not mention google. (Score 1) 70

by BarbaraHudson (#48476963) Attached to: Google Should Be Broken Up, Say European MPs

The resolution underlines that "the online search market is of particular importance in ensuring competitive conditions within the digital single market" and welcomes the Commission’s pledges to investigate further the search engines’ practices.

It calls on the Commission "to prevent any abuse in the marketing of interlinked services by operators of search engines", stressing the importance of non-discriminatory online search. "Indexation, evaluation, presentation and ranking by search engines must be unbiased and transparent", MEPs say.

And it's also not only unenforceable, but impossible. Every evaluation and ranking algorithm that is not based off a random number generator carries, by definition, biases favoring some criteria over others. There will always be someone crying foul because they're lower in the rankings. This is a tar pit.

+ - Ubisoft apologises for Assassin's Creed

Submitted by BarbaraHudson
BarbaraHudson (3785311) writes "As reported here:

As an acknowledgement of the botched launch of Assassin's Creed Unity, Ubisoft has offered free additional content to everyone who purchased the title, cancelled the game's season pass and offered a free game to users who purchased the pass.

The anticipation for Assassin's Creed Unity was such that the myriad of bugs and technical issues experienced at launch felt like an even greater slap in the face for gamers.

"

Comment: Re:How about transfer rate and reliability? (Score 1) 178

by BarbaraHudson (#48476231) Attached to: Consortium Roadmap Shows 100TB Hard Drives Possible By 2025

1 TB has enough data for every man woman and child who ever lived to write a 1500 page book! Will Joe Six Pack really need to have that 30 TB drive when his circa 2012 1 TB drive has 70% free space on it?

Okay, but it's not enough to back up the consciousness of even 1 Joe Sixpack while waiting for the singularity. Anyone want to make a WAG on how much storage that would require?

Comment: Re:How about transfer rate and reliability? (Score 1) 178

by BarbaraHudson (#48476199) Attached to: Consortium Roadmap Shows 100TB Hard Drives Possible By 2025
But at least when a drive is getting ready to donate its' magets to the fridge door, it usually makes noises, clicks, squeals, etc. That gives time to back it up. Plus I've never heard of anyone restoring a failed SSD by sticking it in the fridge overnight (in a plastic bag, of course).

There are trade-offs either way, because unfortunately NOT failing is not an option.

Comment: Re:moof (Score 1) 18

by BarbaraHudson (#48476149) Attached to: What is it like to be mentally ill?
Actually, the real-life kids come over too. They like playing Monopoly and Wii.

As for your co-worker, booze works just fine. Get him good and loaded and slip the rest of the bottle (and a few empties) in one of his drawers. Or even cheaper, just have someone "accidentally" discover his cache of empties and a cruddy glass while the PHBs are around.

Comment: Re:Bah hah hah (Score 1) 118

by BarbaraHudson (#48476129) Attached to: BlackBerry Will Buy Your iPhone For $550
There's no such thing as a message retraction feature - all you need is a camera to make a copy of the message or picture. They can delete it from the server, you'll still have a copy. Anyone sending sensitive information using this bogus "feature" is an idiot. Doubly so if they're sending nude selfies.

Comment: Re:Both sides equally (albeit differently) at faul (Score 1) 98

by BarbaraHudson (#48476079) Attached to: Behind Apple's Sapphire Screen Debacle
Actually, the deal was amended to shift all the risk to GT:

Apple originally offered to buy sapphire-growing furnaces from GT. But according to sources familiar with negotiations, after five months Apple demanded a major change in terms, requiring GT to supply the sapphire itself. In fact, Apple wanted GT to build the world’s largest factory to produce the stuff—more than doubling the world’s entire sapphire production capacity.

In the end, the fundamentals weren't good for either party. GT is bankrupt, and Apple had to switch their plans from sapphire at the last minute.

Comment: Re:Then don't sign the contract (Score 4, Informative) 98

by BarbaraHudson (#48476037) Attached to: Behind Apple's Sapphire Screen Debacle

It's not that cut and dried. Apple was the one who insisted on renegotiating the contract, as well as not installing a backup power supply for each furnace and starting production in a non-commissioned plant.

Apple originally offered to buy sapphire-growing furnaces from GT. But according to sources familiar with negotiations, after five months Apple demanded a major change in terms, requiring GT to supply the sapphire itself. In fact, Apple wanted GT to build the world’s largest factory to produce the stuff—more than doubling the world’s entire sapphire production capacity.

Producing sapphire requires a very clean environment, but ongoing construction at the factory meant that sapphire was grown "in a highly contaminated environment that adversely affected the quality of sapphire material," according to GT. It also requires uninterrupted supplies of water and electricity to regulate the temperature of the molten aluminum oxide used to form the boule. GT said that to save costs, Apple decided not to install backup power supplies, and multiple outages ruined whole batches of sapphire.

Make no mistake about it - Apple was in the driver's seat in this mess. It was their deadline for the iPhone6 that set the stage for attempts to grow sapphire in an unfinished factory. But Apple will find a way to make money out of this.

+ - Researchers Discover an 'Off Switch' For Pain in the Brain-> 1

Submitted by concertina226
concertina226 (2447056) writes "Scientists working together from several international universities have discovered that it is possible to block a pathway in the brain of animals suffering from neuropathic pain, which could have a huge impact on improving pain relief in humans.

So far, the most successful ways to treat chronic pain from a pharmacological point of view are to create drugs that that interact or interfere with various channels in the brain to decrease pain, including adrenergic, opioid and calcium receptors.

However, there is another way – a chemical stimulator called adenosine that binds to brain receptors to trigger a biological response.

Adenosine has shown potential for killing pain in humans, but so far, no one has managed to harness this pain pathway successfully without causing a myriad of side effects.

Led by Dr Daniela Salvemini of SLU, the researchers discovered that by activating the A3 adenosine receptor in the rodents' brains and spinal cords, the receptor was able to prevent or reverse pain from nerve damage (the cause of chronic pain)."

Link to Original Source

+ - Mathematicians Study Effects of Gerrymandering on 2012 Election 1

Submitted by HughPickens.com
HughPickens.com (3830033) writes "Gerrymandering is the practice of establishing a political advantage for a political party by manipulating district boundaries to concentrate all your opponents votes in a few districts while keeping your party's supporters as a majority in the remaining districts. For example, in North Carolina in 2012 Republicans ended up winning nine out of 13 congressional seats even though more North Carolinians voted for Democrats than Republicans statewide. Now Jessica Jones reports that researchers at Duke are studying the mathematical explanation for the discrepancy. Mathematicians Jonathan Mattingly and Christy Vaughn created a series of district maps using the same vote totals from 2012, but with different borders. Their work was governed by two principles of redistricting: a federal rule requires each district have roughly the same population and a state rule requires congressional districts to be compact. Using those principles as a guide, they created a mathematical algorithm to randomly redraw the boundaries of the state’s 13 congressional districts. "We just used the actual vote counts from 2012 and just retabulated them under the different districtings," says Vaughn. "”If someone voted for a particular candidate in the 2012 election and one of our redrawn maps assigned where they live to a new congressional district, we assumed that they would still vote for the same political party."

The results were startling. After re-running the election 100 times with a randomly drawn nonpartisan map each time, the average simulated election result was 7 or 8 U.S. House seats for the Democrats and 5 or 6 for Republicans. The maximum number of Republican seats that emerged from any of the simulations was eight. The actual outcome of the election — four Democratic representatives and nine Republicans – did not occur in any of the simulations. "If we really want our elections to reflect the will of the people, then I think we have to put in safeguards to protect our democracy so redistrictings don't end up so biased that they essentially fix the elections before they get started," says Mattingly. But North Carolina State Senator Bob Rucho is unimpressed. "I'm saying these maps aren't gerrymandered," says Rucho. "It was a matter of what the candidates actually was able to tell the voters and if the voters agreed with them. Why would you call that uncompetitive?""

How many Unix hacks does it take to change a light bulb? Let's see, can you use a shell script for that or does it need a C program?

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