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Comment: System Development Foundation (Score 1) 45

by Baldrson (#49141679) Attached to: The Believers: Behind the Rise of Neural Nets

Its "System Development Foundation" not "System Development Corporation" and Charlie's full name is Charles Sinclair Smith. He's semi-retired now and living the next county over from me in southeast Iowa where we've been collaborating on a couple of projects -- one of which is to photosynthesize all of the CO2 effluent from US fossil fuel power plants (as Charlie got his start co-founding the Energy Information Administration of the DoE under Carter).

Its ironic that in the 80s I was living in La Jolla, which was an epicenter of the neural net revival at UCSD, had taken neural net courses from Robert Hecht-Nielsen and by 1990 had prototyped the highest performance neural network image processing system (as Neural Engines Corporation) -- but I then later worked with Charlie for almost 15 years before discovering he had had played such a key role in the revival of neural nets. Even more ironic is that, circa 2005, I came up with the idea for the Hutter Prize for Lossless Compression of Human Knowledge -- based on Hutter's entirely different, top down mathematics approach to AI -- and Shane Legg, founder of Deep Mind, which is largely identified with deep learning neural nets, actuality studied under Hutter and achieved Deep Mind's famous ability to learn to play video games using Hutter's approach but everyone thinks that capability is uniquely attributable to deep neural net learning alone.

Comment: Article summary (Score 1) 203

by istartedi (#49128619) Attached to: What Happens When Betelgeuse Explodes?

Worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, as bright as a quarter moon for a while, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry, worry.

There would be considerably more worrying were it not for Slashdot filters.

Comment: War, Not Aggression, Is the Failing (Score 1) 532

by Baldrson (#49096395) Attached to: Stephen Hawking: Biggest Human Failing Is Aggression

Virtually all sexual species exhibit aggression. The problem is war, not mere aggression. And this problem goes beyond mere conflict between human groups. E. O. Wilson's "The Social Conquest of Earth" describes how group selection dominates the environment and, in the case of human eusocial organization, degrades biodiversity.

The price of civilization is eusocial organization and the price of eusocial organization is war.

One way of addressing this failing is to turn civilization outward, away from the biosphere, toward "war" on lifeless rock in space -- converting it to life -- leaving the biosphere free of human eusocial organization.

Is there a place for humans in the biosphere?

Yes, but only if individual sovereignty is ruthlessly enforced.

Comment: Re:Ummmm.... (Score 1) 319

by MacDork (#49084221) Attached to: Java Vs. Node.js: Epic Battle For Dev Mindshare
There are counter points to just about everything you've said.
  1. 1. Really? You don't know how to do html/css without javascript? Your SEO must be shit, m8.
  2. 2. All those 'rich' libraries are great until they don't work on IE8 or Chrome 37.0.20341. I especially love when stuff that worked fine years ago is broken today because browser updates changed the internal perfomance characteristics of the javascript vm. Simply put, doing too much on the client puts you at the mercy of client configuration changes which you have no control over.
  3. 3. Libraries, that was your argument in #2 wasn't it? Compare libraries available to Java vs Javascript on the server side. Best tool for the job, right? Sounds like you found yourself a golden hammer.
  4. 4. Can you really? How do you replicate the declaritive html5 form validation on the server? And is it really a good idea sharing your validation code, bugs and all, with the client? Sounds like a major security problem to me.
  5. 5. Let's see how your sorting goes on a table with a million rows client side.. if you're batshit crazy enough to even try that. Most of what you mentioned should and generally does get written in SQL, not JS.
  6. 6. lol, now that's just bait

Performance... you're funny. Tell me about your performance when your server falls over with memory problems and you don't have anything like visualvm to figure out why. Don't get me wrong, Java sucks in its own special ways, but I'd never choose Javascript as my primary language.

Comment: Re:Relation Arithmetic and Dimensional Analysis (Score 1) 210

by Baldrson (#49078163) Attached to: Interviews: Ask Stephen Wolfram a Question

Right. There is a long history of dimensions as after-thought/addon to languages going back to the PLATO system's TUTOR programming language circa 1972. Russell's Relation Arithmetic starts with relational structure and defines equivalence classes of structure as numbers in the arithmetic of relations. Its an entirely different, and correct, approach.

Comment: Relation Arithmetic and Dimensional Analysis (Score 1) 210

by Baldrson (#49074967) Attached to: Interviews: Ask Stephen Wolfram a Question

The penultimate paper of "Bit-string Physics: A Finite and Discrete Approach to Natural Philosophy" discusses an attempted revival of "Relation Arithmetic" with which Russell and Whitehead had planned to cap off their Principia Mathematica in its final volume.

Of Relation Arithmetic, Russel said:

"I think relation-arithmetic important, not only as an interesting generalization, but because it supplies a symbolic technique required for dealing with structure. It has seemed to me that those who are not familiar with mathematical logic find great difficulty in understanding what is meant by 'structure', and, owing to this difficulty, are apt to go astray in attempting to understand the empirical world. For this reason, if for no other, I am sorry that the theory of relation-arithmetic has been largely unnoticed."

-- " My Philosophical Development" by Bertrand Russell

An example of going astray in attempting to understand the empirical world is when people attempt to combine incommensurable quantities in their calculations, not understanding the structure of the relations between the quantities.

Ordinarily, programming languages treat units, as I/O formats for dimensions, as an afterthought -- independent of type checking. However, what if we saw numbers themselves as embodying relational structure, as intended by Russell, thereby unifying the notion of "type checking" with the notion of "number"? Might then the power of dimensional analysis be brought to bear, in a mathematically rigorous way, on the relatively ad hoc notions of "type", hence problematic areas such as the object relational impedance mismatch?

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