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Comment: Upgrading Lots of Machines from a Cache? (Score 1) 172

by billstewart (#46792443) Attached to: Ubuntu Linux 14.04 LTS Trusty Tahr Released

So is there any way to cache Ubuntu upgrades, which would let my large collection of virtual and physical lab machines all fetch them from the LAN instead of the each one having to drag them across its WAN? Might as well fetch the official copy just once, and have everything else update at gigabit speeds.

Comment: What's the closest JEOS equivalent? (Score 1) 172

by billstewart (#46785827) Attached to: Ubuntu Linux 14.04 LTS Trusty Tahr Released

JEOS (Just Enough Operating System) used to be a sub-version of Ubuntu, with a minimal server edition; anything else you wanted was an apt-get install away. But there hasn't been a real JEOS version since about 8.04 or so, and with virtual machines these days I have a need for a lot of small-disk-footprint VMs. Is there something that's relatively similar, with basic networking and maybe a LAMP stack?

It would be nice to have a basic X windows environment, but I don't need big piles of Gnome or KDE, and I definitely don't need OpenOffice or lots of the other fun tools. Thanks!

Comment: Another way to look at "rich" (Score 1) 803

by fyngyrz (#46770359) Attached to: Study Finds US Is an Oligarchy, Not a Democracy

This study defines "rich people" as those making around $146000/year.

If you think about it, there's no control for expenses there, so it's not a very effective definition (I'm always kind of a amazed at the mindset in the US that tries to simplify things by drawing a numeric line in the sand, as if there were no other issues. And people put up with it. We need better schools.

I define "rich" as: wealthy enough to be living in a manner comfortable in every material way to the individual or family, and able to survive indefinitely in that state, or in an increasingly wealthy state without relying on income from, or charity of, others. Regardless of if one actually chooses to exist in that state, or not.

Not trying to force that definition on anyone else, but that's how I see it personally.

Comment: TFS (and perhaps TFA) has it wrong (Score 1) 803

by fyngyrz (#46770173) Attached to: Study Finds US Is an Oligarchy, Not a Democracy

The transition was from a flawed, but still readily identifiable constitutional republic (not a democracy), to a corporate oligarchy.

This has never been a democracy, and furthermore, the constitution insists that the federal government guarantee each state a republican form of government, as in, a republic -- not a democracy. That's in article 4, section 4.

This is why representatives decide the actual matters, and voters don't, in the basic design.

Of course, now even the representatives don't decide -- nor judges -- if the legislation deals in any significant way with business interests. The only way the old system still operates even remotely the way it was designed to is when the issue(s) at hand a purely social ones. Even then, the bill of rights seems to be at the very bottom of any legislator's or judge's list of concerns.

Can't see any of this changing, though. The public is too uninformed, and short of completely revamping the school curriculums, they're going to remain that way.

You are in a maze of little twisting passages, all alike.

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